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Description

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Plants 20-30 cm. Leaves 3-4 (-6), erect, crescent-shaped. Stem and leaves hairy. Flowers 1-3 (5), cup-shaped, 4-6 cm long, brick-red, without a blotch. Filaments and anthers red (rare violet or yellow). V - early spring to midsummer. F - March, April (in St. Petersburg April, May). Fr - June. P - by daughter bulbs. Requires a sunny position, well-drained soil. Good for group planting, the rock garden and for cut flowers. Z 4.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Ornamental Plants From Russia And Adjacent States Of The Former Soviet Union Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Ornamental Plants from Russia and Adjacent States @ eFloras.org
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Tatyana Shulkina
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Distribution

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Central Asia (southeastern Pamiro Alay). In low and middle mountain zones, on gravelly soil, rocky slopes.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Ornamental Plants From Russia And Adjacent States Of The Former Soviet Union Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Ornamental Plants from Russia and Adjacent States @ eFloras.org
editor
Tatyana Shulkina
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Tulipa praestans

provided by wikipedia EN

Tulipa praestans is a species of tulip native to the mountains of Tadzhikistan.[2] Many well known cultivars have been formed from the original plant.[4]

Description

It is a low-growing species tulip,[5] and has 25–45 cm (10–18 in) tall stems.[4] It has 3 to 7 grey-green leaves that are downy and fringed with hairs (ciliate).[4][5] It can have one flower (normally in the wild,[4]) or it can produce multiple flowers per bulb,[6] meaning it can have a pair of flowers or up to a maximum of five flowers per bulb.[4] It blooms in April,[5] with cup shaped flowers.[5][6] The flowers are 5–6.5 cm (2–3 in) wide, in orange-red,[4] orange-scarlet,[5] or scarlet.[6] The anthers are yellow or purple.[4]

Taxonomy

The specific epithet praestans, refers to the Latin for 'remarkable',[7]' pre - eminent , superior , excellent or distinguished'.[8]

T. praestans was originally described and published by Carl Anton von Meyer in The Gardeners' Chronicle Series 3, Vol.33 on page 239 in 1903.[3][9]

Distribution and habitat

It is native to temperate areas of Central Asia.[9][4][10]

Range

It is found in Tajikistan,[9] in the Pamir-Alay mountain system.[6][4]

Habitat

It grows on rocky slopes, screes, and in light woodland,[6] at an altitude of 3,000 m (9,800 ft) above sea level.[6][5]

Cultivars

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Tulipa praestans 'Fusilier'

The following cultivars represent praestans in cultivation: 'Fuselier' always has

  • T. praestans Fuselier;[11] grows up to 30cm tall, with grey-green, lance-shaped leaves and stems in mid spring,[12] bearing between three to five,[4] cup shaped, brilliant red,[12] or bright red flowers,[13] that can measure to 12cm across.[12] It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[14] It is valued by gardeners for its low growth height and habit of producing many flowers per bulb. 'Fusilier' even has a sport, 'Unicum'.[15]
  • T. praestans 'Unicum',[16] with the leaves edged in cream.[15]
  • T. praestans 'Moondance',[17] - has deep orange flowers which are relatively large and have pointy petals.[10]
  • T. praestans 'Zwanenburg' - Anna Pavord in her book The Tulip describes ‘Zwanenburg’ as having “.......particularly striking flowers of a rich, clear red, which open more widely than other varieties”. A taller variety at 35cm.[5]
  • T. praestans 'Shogun' - blooming in mid- to late spring, has single, cup-shaped, yellow-orange flowers, flushed red at the base.[18]
  • T. praestans 'Tubergen's Variety' - has two to five flowers generally with a basal yellow suffusion and is a good doer, persisting in light soils without annual lifting.[4]

Toxicity

All parts may cause severe discomfort if ingested. Contact may cause a skin reaction.[18]

References

  1. ^ Gard. Chron., ser. 3, 33: 239 (1903)
  2. ^ a b "Tulipa praestans H.B.May". Plants of the World Online. Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. 2017. Retrieved 30 August 2020.
  3. ^ a b "Tulipa praestans H.B.May is an accepted name". theplantlist.org (The Plant List). 23 March 2012. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Tulipa praestans". Alpine Garden Society. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Tulipa praestans 'Zwanenburg'". Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Tulipa Species Three | Pacific Bulb Society". www.pacificbulbsociety.org. Retrieved 9 April 2021.
  7. ^ Stephen Henning The Charaxinae Butterflies of Africa (1989), p. 128, at Google Books
  8. ^ Robert Samuel Rudolph The Old English Synonyms for "brave" (1967), p. 17, at Google Books
  9. ^ a b c "Taxon: Tulipa praestans Mast". npgsweb.ars-grin.gov. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  10. ^ a b "Moondance Praestans Perennial Tulip 10 Bulbs - Multi Flowering - 10/11 cm Bulbs". Walmart.com. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  11. ^ "Tulipa praestans 'Fusilier' (Botanical Tulip)". Gardenia.net. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  12. ^ a b c "Tulips that come back year after year". www.flower-gardening-made-easy.com. Retrieved 19 April 2020.
  13. ^ "Tulipa praestans 'Fusilier' - Plant Finder". www.missouribotanicalgarden.org. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  14. ^ "Tulipa praestans 'Fusilier' (15)". The Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  15. ^ a b Wilford, Richard (8 April 2015). The Plant Lover's Guide to Tulips. p. 89. ISBN 9781604696899.
  16. ^ "PlantFiles: Species Tulip". Dave's Garden. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  17. ^ "Tulipa praestans 'Moondance' (15)". rhs.org.uk. Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  18. ^ a b "Tulipa praestans 'Shogun' (Tulip 'Shogun')". Retrieved 19 April 2020.
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Tulipa praestans: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Tulipa praestans is a species of tulip native to the mountains of Tadzhikistan. Many well known cultivars have been formed from the original plant.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
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wikipedia EN