dcsimg

Biology

provided by Arkive
Water shrews belonging to the genus Chimarrogale are reportedly competent underwater swimmers, and feed on insects, aquatic larvae, small crustaceans and fish found in their forest stream habitat (3). Like many other water shrews, the Malayan water shrew regularly grooms its fur, spreading skin oils throughout the coat in order to maintain its water-repellent properties (2).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Conservation

provided by Arkive
The Malayan water shrew's presence in the Ulu Langat Forest Reserve may offer a little protection. In 2005, Ulu Langat Forest Reserve was declared part of a State Heritage Park, which, although illegal logging still occurs, is hoped to prevent further human encroachment (5). A conservation action plan for all Eurasian insectivores and tree shrews, including the Malayan water shrew, was complied by IUCN in 1995. The plan recommended that this Critically Endangered species should be the subject of an immediate investigation, starting within the Ulu Langat Forest Reserve, before carrying out surveys elsewhere in the region. The results of such surveys would help inform a management plan for this species and its habitat (6).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Description

provided by Arkive
This exceptionally rare water-dwelling animal has a body modified for an aquatic life (3). While it is relatively large for a shrew (3), the body and head, with the long, pointed nose characteristic of all shrews (4), are streamlined (2). The short, dense fur, which is dark grey on the back, sometimes with a brownish tinge, and pale grey or white on the underside (5), is somewhat water repellent (3). Occasional silver-tipped hairs are found throughout the coat, and the long tail is dark brown (5). The eyes of the Malayan water shrew are tiny, and the small ears can be sealed with a flap of skin when underwater. The feet are fringed with stiff hairs, an adaptation which aids propulsion when the shrew is kicking through the water (3).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Habitat

provided by Arkive
Inhabits streams in tropical mountain forest (7), probably up to altitudes of 3,300 metres (6).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Range

provided by Arkive
The Malayan water shrew has only been recorded from the Ulu Langat Forest Reserve, in the state of Selangor in Peninsular Malaysia (6).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Status

provided by Arkive
Classified as Near Threatened (NT) on the IUCN Red List (1).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Threats

provided by Arkive
The little-known Malayan water shrew depends on clear mountain streams for its survival, and so water pollution poses a threat to this species existence. Deforestation increases the amount of sediment that is washed into streams, degrading the quality of the Malayan water shrew's habitat (3). In addition, Malayan water shrews are sometimes caught in fish traps as they forage underwater (6).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Malayan water shrew

provided by wikipedia EN

The Malayan water shrew (Chimarrogale hantu), also known as the hantu water shrew, is a red-toothed shrew recorded only from the Malaysian state of Selangor. It was listed as a critically endangered, but is now considered near threatened.[2]

It gets its scientific name hantu from the Malay word for ghost.

Anatomy

The Malayan water shrew has a white underside, a black coat along its top and sides and a fringe of bristles running along the surface of the tail and on the paws which act as swimming aids. The teeth have red tips. The Malayan water shrew can grow up to about 10 cm in height and 20 cm in length.

Habitat

The Malayan water shrew lives in the Tropical Rainforests of Peninsula Malaysia. It lives mainly by fresh water lakes and rivers surrounded by vegetation and spends much of its time underwater. Underwater this shrew likes to stay in leafy areas to avoid predators and surprise its prey, which include fish, frogs and plants.

References

  1. ^ Hutterer, R. (2005). Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 275. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  2. ^ a b Gerrie, R.; Kennerley, R. (2018). "Chimarrogale hantu". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2018: e.T4647A22281948. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-1.RLTS.T4647A22281948.en. Retrieved 19 November 2021.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Malayan water shrew: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Malayan water shrew (Chimarrogale hantu), also known as the hantu water shrew, is a red-toothed shrew recorded only from the Malaysian state of Selangor. It was listed as a critically endangered, but is now considered near threatened.

It gets its scientific name hantu from the Malay word for ghost.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN