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Brief Summary

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There are around 15 species of mackerel shark. This order includes the Great White Shark and other famous sharks. These sharks have two dorsal fins, five gill slits on each side, and a mouth that ends behind they eyes.
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Sebastian Velvez
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Lamniformes

provided by wikipedia EN

The Lamniformes (/ˈlæmnɪfɔːrmz/, from Greek lamna "fish of prey") are an order of sharks commonly known as mackerel sharks (which may also refer specifically to the family Lamnidae). It includes some of the most familiar species of sharks, such as the great white,[1] as well as more unusual representatives, such as the goblin shark and megamouth shark.

Members of the order are distinguished by possessing two dorsal fins, an anal fin, five gill slits, eyes without nictitating membranes, and a mouth extending behind the eyes. Species in two families of Lamniformes – Lamnidae and Alopiidae – are distinguished for maintaining a higher body temperature than the surrounding water.[2]

The oldest member of the group is Palaeocarcharias, known from the Middle and Late Jurassic, which shares the distinctive tooth histology of lamniform sharks, which lack orthodentine.[3]

Species

The order Lamniformes includes 10 families with 22 species, with a total of seven living families and 17 living species:

Order Lamniformes

Sustainable consumption

In 2010, Greenpeace International added the shortfin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) to its seafood red list. [18]

References

  1. ^ Pimiento, Catalina; Cantalapiedra, Juan L.; Shimada, Kenshu; Field, Daniel J.; Smaers, Jeroen B. (24 January 2019). "Evolutionary pathways toward gigantism in sharks and rays". Evolution. 73 (2): 588–599. doi:10.1111/evo.13680. PMID 30675721. S2CID 59224442.
  2. ^ Donley, Jeanine M.; Sepulveda, Chugey A.; Aalbers, Scott A.; McGillivray, David G.; Syme, Douglas A.; Bernal, Diego (2012-04-13). "Effects of temperature on power output and contraction kinetics in the locomotor muscle of the regionally endothermic common thresher shark (Alopias vulpinus)". Fish Physiology and Biochemistry. 38 (5): 1507–1519. doi:10.1007/s10695-012-9641-1. ISSN 0920-1742. PMID 22527612. S2CID 1100494.
  3. ^ Jambura, Patrick L.; Kindlimann, René; López-Romero, Faviel; Marramà, Giuseppe; Pfaff, Cathrin; Stumpf, Sebastian; Türtscher, Julia; Underwood, Charlie J.; Ward, David J.; Kriwet, Jürgen (2019-07-04). "Micro-computed tomography imaging reveals the development of a unique tooth mineralization pattern in mackerel sharks (Chondrichthyes; Lamniformes) in deep time". Scientific Reports. 9 (1): 9652. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-46081-3. ISSN 2045-2322. PMC 6609643. PMID 31273249.
  4. ^ a b c Kriwet, Jürgen; Klug, Stefanie; Canudo, José I.; Cuenca-Bescos, Gloria (October 2008). "A new Early Cretaceous lamniform shark (Chondrichthyes, Neoselachii)". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 154 (2): 278–290. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2008.00410.x.
  5. ^ Frederickson, Joseph A.; Schaefer, Scott N.; Doucette-Frederickson, Janessa A. (3 June 2015). "A Gigantic Shark from the Lower Cretaceous Duck Creek Formation of Texas" (PDF). PLOS ONE. 10 (6): e0127162. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0127162. PMC 4454486. PMID 26039066.
  6. ^ "20-Foot Monster Shark Once Trolled Mesozoic Seas". livescience.com. 3 June 2015. Retrieved 7 April 2018.
  7. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). "Alopiidae" in FishBase. October 2013 version.
  8. ^ Basking shark BBC Nature, 13 March 2013. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  9. ^ Stevens, J.; Last, P.R. (1998). Paxton, J.R.; Eschmeyer, W.N. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
  10. ^ Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2005). "Mitsukurina owstoni" in FishBase. 10 2005 version.
  11. ^ "Mitsukurinidae". www.helsinki.fi. Retrieved 7 April 2018.
  12. ^ National Geographic (10 September 2010). "Sand Tiger Sharks". National Geographic. Retrieved 8 December 2012.
  13. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2009). "Odontaspididae" in FishBase. January 2009 version.
  14. ^ Bigelow, Henry B.; Schroeder, William C. (1953). Fishes of the Gulf of Maine. United States Government Printing Office. Retrieved 30 October 2011.
  15. ^ Mikael Siverson; Marcin Machalski (2017). "Late late Albian (Early Cretaceous) shark teeth from Annopol, Poland". Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology. 41 (4): 433–463. doi:10.1080/03115518.2017.1282981. S2CID 133123002.
  16. ^ Mikael Siverson (1999). "A new large lamniform shark from the uppermost Gearle Siltstone (Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous) of Western Australia". Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences. 90 (1): 49–66. doi:10.1017/S0263593300002509.
  17. ^ Joseph S. Nelson (2006). "Order Lamniformes". Fishes of the World (4th ed.). John Wiley and Sons. pp. 57–60. ISBN 978-0-471-25031-9.
  18. ^ Greenpeace International Seafood Red list Archived 2010-04-10 at the Wayback Machine
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Lamniformes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Lamniformes (/ˈlæmnɪfɔːrmiːz/, from Greek lamna "fish of prey") are an order of sharks commonly known as mackerel sharks (which may also refer specifically to the family Lamnidae). It includes some of the most familiar species of sharks, such as the great white, as well as more unusual representatives, such as the goblin shark and megamouth shark.

Members of the order are distinguished by possessing two dorsal fins, an anal fin, five gill slits, eyes without nictitating membranes, and a mouth extending behind the eyes. Species in two families of Lamniformes – Lamnidae and Alopiidae – are distinguished for maintaining a higher body temperature than the surrounding water.

The oldest member of the group is Palaeocarcharias, known from the Middle and Late Jurassic, which shares the distinctive tooth histology of lamniform sharks, which lack orthodentine.

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