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Comments

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This species is often used as stock to graft pear cultivars.
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 177 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Trees to 5–8 m tall. Branchlets purplish red when young, purplish brown when old, terete, white tomentose when young, glabrous when old, sparsely pale lenticellate; buds narrowly ovoid, apex obtuse; scales tomentose at margin. Stipules caducous, linear-lanceolate, 1–2 mm, membranous, adaxially sparsely tomentose, margin sparsely glandular denticulate, apex acuminate; petiole 2–6 cm, sparsely pubescent or subglabrous; leaf blade elliptic-ovate or narrowly ovate, 6–10 × 3.5–5 cm, sparsely tomentose when young, soon glabrescent, base broadly cuneate, margin serrate, apex long acuminate. Raceme umbel-like, 5–8-flowered; peduncle tomentose when young, soon glabrescent; bracts caducous, linear-lanceolate, 8–11 mm, membranous, adaxially villous, margin entire, apex acuminate. Pedicel 2–2.5 cm, subglabrous. Flowers ca. 3 cm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially white tomentose. Sepals triangular-lanceolate, 2–3 mm, adaxially tomentose, margin entire, apex acuminate. Petals white, ovate, 1–1.5 cm, base shortly clawed, apex rounded. Stamens 20, ca. 1/2 as long as petals. Ovary (2- or)3- or 4-loculed, with 2 ovules per locule; styles (2 or)3 or 4, nearly as long as stamens, glabrous basally. Pome brown with pale dots, globose or ovoid, 2–2.5 cm in diam., 3- or 4-loculed; sepals caducous; fruiting pedicel 2–4 cm, glabrous. Fl. Apr, fr. Aug–Sep. 2n = 34*.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 177 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Distribution

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Gansu, Hebei, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Xinjiang.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 177 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Habitat

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Slopes, mixed hillside forests of the Loess Plateau; 100--1200 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 9: 177 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Pyrus phaeocarpa

provided by wikipedia EN

Pyrus phaeocarpa, the dusky pear or orange pear, is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae, native to the Loess Plateau of northern China.[1][2][3] A wide tree reaching at most 7–8 m (23–26 ft) in height, it is hardy to USDA zone 5, or perhaps even zone 4.[4][5] Its small yellow to brown fruit are edible, and its Autumn foliage is bright orange to orange-red, giving it good potential as an ornamental.[4][5][6] Its chloroplast genome shows that it is closely related to Pyrus pashia, the wild Himalayan pear, and it is suspected to be a hybrid of P. betulifolia, the birchleaf pear, P. pyrifolia, the apple pear, and P. ussuriensis, the Manchurian pear.[7]

References

  1. ^ "Pyrus phaeocarpa Rehder". Plants of the World Online. Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  2. ^ Franklin, Jeff (2021). "Franklin, Jeff Pyrus phaeocarpa Rehd. (dusky pear), growth habit, tree form". mortonarb.org. The Morton Arboretum. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  3. ^ "Pyrus phaeocarpa - Orange Pear". jurassicplants.co.uk. Jurassicplants Nurseries. 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2021. ...stunning display of colour...
  4. ^ a b "Pyrus phaeocarpa Rehder". Trees and Shrubs Online. International Dendrology Society. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Pyrus phaeocarpa - Rehder". pfaf.org. Plants For A Future. 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  6. ^ "Orange Pear, Pyrus phaeocarpa, deciduous, Spectacular Autumnal Display, Rarely Offered, Great for UK Climate, 8-10cm Plant in an 8cm Pot". bizbuddyv.com. BizBud. 2021. Retrieved 25 October 2021.
  7. ^ Xiang, Qiu-Hong; Zhang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Qing; Wang, Xin-Rui; Guan, Wen-Bin (2019). "The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Pyrus phaeocarpa Rehd". Mitochondrial DNA Part B. 4: 1370–1371. doi:10.1080/23802359.2019.1598804. S2CID 131934505.
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Wikipedia authors and editors
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Pyrus phaeocarpa: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Pyrus phaeocarpa, the dusky pear or orange pear, is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae, native to the Loess Plateau of northern China. A wide tree reaching at most 7–8 m (23–26 ft) in height, it is hardy to USDA zone 5, or perhaps even zone 4. Its small yellow to brown fruit are edible, and its Autumn foliage is bright orange to orange-red, giving it good potential as an ornamental. Its chloroplast genome shows that it is closely related to Pyrus pashia, the wild Himalayan pear, and it is suspected to be a hybrid of P. betulifolia, the birchleaf pear, P. pyrifolia, the apple pear, and P. ussuriensis, the Manchurian pear.

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Wikipedia authors and editors
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wikipedia EN