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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 11 years Observations: These animals can live up to 11 years in the wild (Blumstein and Moller 2008).
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Catharus ustulatus

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Grayer overall than most of its North American relatives, Swainson’s Thrush (7 inches) is most easily separated from a similar species, the Gray-cheeked Thrush, by its buff-brown cheeks and conspicuous eye-rings. Other field marks include a spotted breast, pink legs, and a medium-length bill. Male and female Swainson’s Thrushes are similar to one another in all seasons. The Swainson’s Thrush breeds in Alaska and across a wide swath of central and southern Canada. Smaller numbers are found south of the Canadian border, particularly along the Pacific coast and at higher elevations in the Appalachians and the Rocky Mountains. Swainson’s Thrush winters in southern Mexico and Central America south to Argentina. In summer, Swainson’s Thrush breeds primarily in evergreen forests dominated by spruce and fir trees. During the winter, this species inhabits wet tropical forests. On migration, Swainson’s Thrush may be found in a variety of habitats with dense undergrowth available for foraging and cover. Many North American birders never travel far south enough to see Swainson’s Thrush in winter. This species is much easier to observe in summer and on migration, although it is more often heard than seen due to its preference for habitats with thick vegetation. Swainson’s Thrush may be observed foraging food while hopping along the forest floor or through the branches of trees. Swainson’s Thrush is most active during the day, but, like many migratory songbirds, this species migrates at night.

Threat Status: Least Concern

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Smithsonian Institution
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Reid Rumelt

Catharus ustulatus

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Grayer overall than most of its North American relatives, Swainson’s Thrush (7 inches) is most easily separated from a similar species, the Gray-cheeked Thrush, by its buff-brown cheeks and conspicuous eye-rings. Other field marks include a spotted breast, pink legs, and a medium-length bill. Male and female Swainson’s Thrushes are similar to one another in all seasons. The Swainson’s Thrush breeds in Alaska and across a wide swath of central and southern Canada. Smaller numbers are found south of the Canadian border, particularly along the Pacific coast and at higher elevations in the Appalachians and the Rocky Mountains. Swainson’s Thrush winters in southern Mexico and Central America south to Argentina. In summer, Swainson’s Thrush breeds primarily in evergreen forests dominated by spruce and fir trees. During the winter, this species inhabits wet tropical forests. On migration, Swainson’s Thrush may be found in a variety of habitats with dense undergrowth available for foraging and cover. Many North American birders never travel far south enough to see Swainson’s Thrush in winter. This species is much easier to observe in summer and on migration, although it is more often heard than seen due to its preference for habitats with thick vegetation. Swainson’s Thrush may be observed foraging food while hopping along the forest floor or through the branches of trees. Swainson’s Thrush is most active during the day, but, like many migratory songbirds, this species migrates at night.

References

  • Mack, Diane Evans and Wang Yong. 2000. Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/540
  • eBird Range Map - Swainson's Thrush. eBird. Cornell Lab of Ornithology, N.d. Web. 20 July 2012.
  • Catharus ustulatus. Xeno-canto. Xeno-canto Foundation, n.d. Web. 20 July 2012.
  • Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus). The Internet Bird Collection. Lynx Edicions, n.d. Web. 20 July 2012.

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Rumelt, Reid B. Catharus ustulatus. June-July 2012. Brief natural history summary of Catharus ustulatus. Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, Washington, D.C.
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Robert Costello (kearins)
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Comprehensive Description

provided by Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
Catharus ustulatus (Nuttall)

The nominate race of this thrush had previously (Friedmann, 1963:75) been recorded only twice as a victim of the dwarf race of the brown-headed cowbird (M. ater obscurus). Five more records, from Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, and San Luis Obispo counties, California, may now be added; the sets are in the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and the Western Foundation. In Alberta, Kondla and Pinel (1971) reported a sixth instance of parasitism on the race C. ustulatus swainsoni by the cowbird, M. ater artemisiae. In southern Vancouver Island, in July 1971, 2 records of parasitism on this thrush were noted, and were reported to us by Dr. J. B. Tatum.

VEERY
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Friedmann, Herbert, Kiff, Lloyd F., and Rothstein, Stephen I. 1977. "A further contribution of knowledge of the host relations of the parasitic cowbirds." Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology. 1-75. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.00810282.235

Swainson's thrush

provided by wikipedia EN

Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus), also called olive-backed thrush and russet-backed thrush, is a medium-sized thrush. It is a member of genus Catharus and is typical of it in terms of its subdued coloration and beautiful, ascending flute-like voice. Swainson's thrush was named after William Swainson, an English ornithologist.

Etymology

The genus name Catharus comes from the Ancient Greek katharos, "pure or clean" and refers to the plumage of the orange-billed nightingale-thrush C. aurantiirostris. The specific ustuatus is Latin for "burnt", from urere, "to burn".[2]

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South Padre Island - Texas

Habitat

The breeding habitat of Swainson's thrush is coniferous woods with dense undergrowth across Canada, Alaska, and the northern United States; also, deciduous wooded areas on the Pacific coast of North America.

Range & distribution

These birds migrate to southern Mexico and as far south as Argentina. The coastal subspecies migrate down the Pacific coast of North America and winter from Mexico to Costa Rica, whereas the continental birds migrate eastwards within North America (a substantial detour) and then travel southwards via Florida to winter from Panama to Bolivia. Swainson's thrush is a very rare vagrant to western Europe. It has also occurred as a vagrant in northeast Asia.[3]

Threats

This species may be displaced by the hermit thrush where their ranges overlap. Possibly, the latter species adapts more readily to human encroachment upon its habitat. At least in the winter quarters, Swainson's thrush tends to keep away from areas of human construction and other activity.

Description

This species is 16–20 cm (6.3–7.9 in) in length. The wingspan averages at 30 cm (12 in) and the wing chord is 8.7–10.5 cm (3.4–4.1 in). The bill measures 1.5–1.9 cm (0.59–0.75 in) in length and the tarsus is 2.5 to 3.1 cm (0.98 to 1.22 in) long. This species' body mass can range from 23 to 45 g (0.81 to 1.59 oz).[4][5][6] This thrush has the white-dark-white underwing pattern characteristic of Catharus thrushes. Adults are brown on the upperparts. The underparts are white with brown on the flanks; the breast is lighter brown with darker spots. They have pink legs and a light brown eye ring. Birds in the east are more olive-brown on the upperparts; western birds are more reddish brown. This bird's song is a hurried series of flute-like tones spiralling upwards.

Diet

They forage on the forest floor, also in trees.[7] Swainson's thrushes mainly eat insects, fruits and berries.[8] They make a cup nest on a horizontal tree branch.

Subspecies

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South Padre Island, Texas

Four subspecies are recognised, Cathartus ustulatus alame, C. u. swainsoni, C. u. ustulatus and C. u. oedicus. Subspecies Cathartus ustulatus alame and C. u. swainsoni summer east of the British Columbian Coast Mountains, the Cascades and the Sierra Nevada, and C. u. ustulatus and C. u. oedicus summer west of these ranges. There is a small area of overlap in the Coast Mountains. Recent molecular systematics work[9] confirms that these two pairs of subspecies form two genetically distinct clades, referred to as the continental and coastal clades, which diverged during the Late Pleistocene era, probably about 10,000 years ago as the last ice age came to its end and habitats shifted across North America.

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A Swainson's thrush in British Columbia

The genetic differences between the subspecies, and the circuitous migratory route of the continental birds, strongly suggest that these species underwent a rapid range expansion following the end of the last ice age, with populations originally summering in the south-east of North America expanding their ranges northwards and westwards as the ice retreated. Details of the molecular genetic analysis support the hypothesis of rapid expansion of both coastal and continental populations. The current migratory routes of the continental birds, especially the western populations, are not optimal in ecological terms, and presumably represent an inherited, historical route pattern that has not yet adapted to the birds' modern population locations.

These results notwithstanding, analysis of mtDNA cytochrome b and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 as well as nuclear β-fibrinogen intron 7 sequence data[10] shows that Swainson's thrush is the most ancient North American species of its genus; it is not closely related to other Catharus and the outward similarities with the other North American species are due to convergent evolution.

Footnotes

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2018). "Catharus ustulatus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2018: e.T103881682A132046297. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2018-2.RLTS.T103881682A132046297.en. Retrieved 18 November 2021.
  2. ^ Jobling, James A (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. pp. 94, 397. ISBN 978-1-4081-2501-4.
  3. ^ Brazil, Mark (2009) Birds of East Asia ISBN 978-0-7136-7040-0 page 402
  4. ^ "Swainson's Thrush".
  5. ^ "eNature: FieldGuides: Species Detail". Archived from the original on 2012-03-05.
  6. ^ Thrushes by Peter Clement. Princeton University Press (2001), ISBN 978-0-691-08852-5
  7. ^ Wiley, S., R. Kannan, D.A. James and A. Deshwal. (2015). "Foraging behavior of Swainson's Thrushes (Catharus ustulatus) during spring migration through Arkansas". J. Arkansas Academy Science. 69: 124–129.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ Out of the wide range of fruit eaten by this bird, those of Cymbopetalum mayanum (Annonaceae) and especially Trophis racemosa (Moraceae) are well-liked whenever available in the winter quarters. However, they are generally not taken from feeders or disturbed habitat: Foster (2007)
  9. ^ Ruegg & Smith (2002)
  10. ^ Winker & Pruett (2006)

References

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Swainson's thrush: Brief Summary

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Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus), also called olive-backed thrush and russet-backed thrush, is a medium-sized thrush. It is a member of genus Catharus and is typical of it in terms of its subdued coloration and beautiful, ascending flute-like voice. Swainson's thrush was named after William Swainson, an English ornithologist.

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