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Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

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Maximum longevity: 8 years (wild)
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Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
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de Magalhaes, J. P.
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Diagnostic Description

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A small, spindle-shaped shark with a long, rounded snout, large circular eyes, and oblique-cusped serrated teeth; 2nd dorsal fin very low; interdorsal ridge present (Ref. 5578). 2nd dorsal, pectorals and lower caudal lobe with dark tips; 1st dorsal with thin but conspicuous dark tip; pelvic fins and upper caudal lobe plain (Ref. 5485). Grey or grey-brown above, white below with a golden-brown sheen on the area between eyes and gill slits (in fresh specimens); pectorals, second dorsal, and lower caudal fin lobe with conspicuous black tips, first dorsal and upper caudal fin lobe with black edging (Ref. 9997). A dark band on flank extending rearwards to pelvic fins (Ref. 9997).
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Recorder
Cristina V. Garilao
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Life Cycle

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Viviparous, with a yolk-sac placenta (Ref. 244). Pups, average 3, range 1-8, are produced in January after a 10-month gestation period. Average length at birth is 50 cm TL. Length increases by about 25 cm during the first year. These sharks breed once each year (Ref. 13440). Distinct pairing with embrace (Ref. 205).
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Susan M. Luna
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Morphology

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Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 0; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 0
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Cristina V. Garilao
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Trophic Strategy

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Feeding depth changes with shark size (Ref. 13440). Occurs throughout the water column, but mainly in midwater or near the surface (Ref. 6871).
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Biology

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Found on the continental and insular shelves, primarily near reefs (Ref. 244). Sometimes in offshore waters (Ref. 30573). Live near the seabed during the day and near the surface at night (Ref. 6390). Feeds on bony fishes (Ref. 68964). Shark movements often short (50 km) but may be more than 1,000 km (Ref. 6390). Prefers teleost fishes but also feeds on cephalopods and crustaceans (Ref. 6871). Viviparous (Ref. 50449). Regularly caught by local artisanal and small-scale commercial fisheries where it occurs (Ref. 244). Utilized as a food fish; fins used in the oriental shark fin trade, liver for vitamin oil, and offal for fishmeal (Ref. 9997).
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Kent E. Carpenter
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Importance

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fisheries: minor commercial; price category: high; price reliability: reliable: based on ex-vessel price for this species
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Kent E. Carpenter
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分布

provided by The Fish Database of Taiwan
分布於印度-西太平洋區,西起紅海、非洲東岸,東至菲律賓,北至臺灣及中國,南至澳洲。臺灣南部、西部、東北部及東部海域均有分布。
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臺灣魚類資料庫
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臺灣魚類資料庫

利用

provided by The Fish Database of Taiwan
主要以流刺網及延繩釣捕獲,經濟價值高。肉質佳,可加工成各種肉製品;鰭可做魚翅;皮厚可加工成皮革;肝可加工製成維他命及油;剩餘物製成魚粉。
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描述

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體呈紡錘型,軀幹頗粗壯。頭寬扁。尾基上下方各具一凹窪。吻端寬圓。眼圓,瞬膜發達。前鼻瓣窄而延長,呈乳頭狀;無口鼻溝或觸鬚。口裂寬,深弧形,口閉時上下頜緊合,不露齒;上頜齒寬扁三角形,邊緣具明顯鋸齒,齒尖外斜,外緣有一凹刻,凹刻下方具3-4小齒尖;下頜齒較窄而傾斜,邊緣略具鋸齒。噴水孔缺如。背鰭2個,背鰭間存在明顯的隆脊,第一背鰭寬大,起點與胸鰭內角相對,後緣凹入,上角鈍尖,下角尖突;第二背鰭小,起點在臀鰭起點之後,後緣入凹,後角尖突;胸鰭中大型,鐮刀形,後緣凹入,外角鈍尖,內角鈍圓,鰭端伸達第一背鰭基底後端;尾鰭寬長,尾椎軸上揚,下葉前部顯著三角形突出,中部低平延長,與後部間有一深缺刻,後部小三角形突出,尾端尖突。體背側灰褐色;腹側白色。第一背鰭和尾鰭上葉具黑色緣;第二背鰭上部、尾部下葉前端、胸鰭後端各具明顯的黑色斑塊;臀鰭和腹鰭前部暗褐色。
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棲地

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棲息於沿岸、近海的中小型鯊魚。幼鯊活動於沿岸,成魚則活動於外海。有遷移的習性以及垂直洄游習性,亦即白天活動於海床,而晚上活動為水表會。主要以魚類、頭足類、甲殼類為食。胎生,一胎可產下2-6尾幼鯊,剛出生之幼鯊體長可達50-60公分。
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Spot-tail shark

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The spot-tail shark, or sorrah shark (Carcharhinus sorrah), is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, found in the tropical Indo-West Pacific Ocean between latitudes 31°N and 31°S, from the surface to a depth around 72 m (236 ft). This shark grows to about 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in). It is fished commercially over much of its range and the IUCN considers it to be near threatened.

Description

The spot-tail shark is a spindle-shaped fish growing to about 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in). It has a fairly long, pointed snout and moderately large eyes. The first dorsal fin is large and curved, while the second dorsal fin is small and low. The back and sides are grey and the belly white, and a long white streak is on the flank. This species can be distinguished from other requiem sharks found in tropical waters by the distinctive black tips to the second dorsal fin, the pectoral fins, and the lower lobe of the caudal fin. A ridge over the spine extends from the first to the second dorsal fin and a pit just in front of the upper lobe of the caudal fin. The upper teeth are serrated, oblique, and triangular. The Australian blacktip shark (C. tilstoni), which occupies a similar range, has similar black tips to the fins, but additionally has a black tip to its first dorsal fin. It lacks the ridge between the two dorsal fins and its upper teeth are also different, being slender, upright, and pointed.[3][4]

Distribution

The spot-tail shark is found in the tropical Indo-Pacific on continental and insular shelves commonly to a depth around 73 m (240 ft), but possibly as deep as 140 metres (460 ft).[5] Its range extends from the East African coast, Madagascar, and the Red Sea to India, Malaysia, China, the Philippines, and northern Australia.[4]

Biology

The spot-tail shark spends the day near the seabed and the night at the surface, most frequently around reefs. It is a predator and feeds on bony fish such as bonito and sea bass, cephalopods, and crustaceans.[4][5]

The spot-tail shark is viviparous with a yolk-sac placenta, giving birth once a year to a litter of one to eight live young.[1] The gestation period is 10 months and the pups measure about 50 cm (20 in) at birth.[1] The young develop in shallow inshore waters.[1] They grow rapidly at first, increasing in length by about 20 cm (8 in) during their first year, but growth slows down thereafter. Females reach sexual maturity at two to three years and live for a maximum of seven years, while males live up to five years.[6]

Status

The spot-tail shark is caught by line and gillnet in many parts of its range by small-scale commercial fisheries. The flesh is used for food, the liver for vitamins, the fins for shark fin soup, and the offal for fish meal.[5] The IUCN has listed this shark as being near threatened, as it suffers from overfishing throughout much of its range and many populations seem to be in decline. The fisheries in northern Australia are relatively well managed.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Simpfendorfer, C.; Derrick, D.; Tanay, D.; Seyha, L.; Fahmi, Haque, A.B.; Bin Ali, A.; Maung, A.; , D.; Bineesh, K.K.; Vo, V.Q.; Utzurrum, J.A.T.; Yuneni, R.R.; Fernando, D. (2021). "Carcharhinus sorrah". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2021: e.T161376A173434793. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2021-2.RLTS.T161376A173434793.en. Retrieved 19 November 2021.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ a b Bailly, Nicolas (2014). "Carcharhinus sorrah (Müller & Henle, 1839)". WoRMS. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2014-08-02.
  3. ^ Daley, Ross K. (2002). Field Guide to Australian Sharks and Rays. Csiro Publishing. p. 34. ISBN 978-1-876996-10-9.
  4. ^ a b c Compagno, L.J.V. "Spot-tail shark (Carcharhinus sorrah)". Sharks of the World. Marine Species Identification Portal. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  5. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.). "Carcharhinus sorrah (Müller & Henle, 1839)". FishBase. Retrieved 2014-08-03.
  6. ^ Davenport, S.; Stevens, J.D. (1988). "Age and growth of two commercially imported sharks (Carcharhinus tilstoni and C. sorrah) from Northern Australia". Australian Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research. 39 (4): 417–433. doi:10.1071/MF9880417.

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Spot-tail shark: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The spot-tail shark, or sorrah shark (Carcharhinus sorrah), is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, found in the tropical Indo-West Pacific Ocean between latitudes 31°N and 31°S, from the surface to a depth around 72 m (236 ft). This shark grows to about 1.6 m (5 ft 3 in). It is fished commercially over much of its range and the IUCN considers it to be near threatened.

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Description

provided by World Register of Marine Species
Found on the continental and insular shelves, near islands and reefs. Feeds on small fishes and octopus (Ref. 5213). Possibly to 230 cm. Viviparous; litter size 2-6; 45-60 cm at birth (Ref. 2334). Utilized for human consumption, and probably for finsoup and liver oil.
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bibliographic citation
Froese, R. & D. Pauly (Editors). (2021). FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (08/2021). Froese, R. & D. Pauly (Editors). (2021). FishBase. World Wide Web electronic publication. version (08/2021).
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Edward Vanden Berghe [email]
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Edward Vanden Berghe [email]