dcsimg
Image of Common sawshark
Life » » Animals » » Vertebrates » » Cartilaginous Fishes » » Modern Sharks » » Saw Sharks »

Common Sawshark

Pristiophorus cirratus (Latham 1794)

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks communicate using sight, touch, and electric signals. They perceive their environment with mediocre eyesight, use their barbels to touch the ocean floor, and use their ampullae to sense electrical fields. They communicate with other animals visually and use their barbels and ampullae when searching for prey.

Communication Channels: visual ; tactile ; chemical ; electric

Perception Channels: visual ; tactile ; chemical ; electric

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Effective efforts have been made to protect longnose sawsharks. Commercial fishing of longnose sawsharks has been reduced due to the implementation of a Total Allowable Catch rule. Also, a three mile stretch of Victorian waters have been closed to all shark fishing, which provides some safe habitat for longnose sawsharks.

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

State of Michigan List: no special status

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Cycle

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks are born in litters of 3 to 22 individuals. They are born with their teeth folded back, which mostly likely is an adaptation to prevent possible injury to the mother during the birthing process. The teeth straighten shortly after birth. Sawsharks are born fully developed, looking like smaller versions of adults. Newborn sawsharks are generally 31 to 34 cm in length. Sawsharks do not undergo a metamorphosis and exhibit determinate growth.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks have no adverse economic impact on humans.

Negative Impacts: injures humans (bites or stings)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks are commercially fished for their high-quality meat.

Positive Impacts: food

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Associations

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks are not a keystone species, although their absence would have an impact on creatures living on the ocean floor because they serve as prey for longnose sawsharks. Longnose sawsharks often serve as hosts for tetraphyllidean tapeworms.

Commensal/Parasitic Species:

  • Tetraphyllidean tapeworms (Tetraphyllidea)
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks feed on bony fish,including cornet fishes (Fistularia), shrimp, small squids, and various crustaceans. Longnose sawsharks uses their barbels and snout to detect prey on the ocean floor, and then immobilize their prey by hitting it with a side-swipe of their snout, which is lined with sharp teeth.

Animal Foods: fish; mollusks; aquatic crustaceans

Primary Diet: carnivore (Piscivore , Eats non-insect arthropods, Molluscivore )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Pliotrema warreni is found in the waters around southern Australia’s outer continental shelf, and is endemic to that region. This includes the eastern portion of the Indian Ocean and the southwest portion of the Pacific Ocean. They are found in the area described by the latitudes 20° to 41° south and longitude 112° to 150° east.

Biogeographic Regions: indian ocean (Native ); pacific ocean (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks prefer a variety of marine habitats including the open sea and coastal regions. They are typically found at depths below 40 meters.

Range depth: 40 to 310 m.

Habitat Regions: tropical ; saltwater or marine

Aquatic Biomes: pelagic ; benthic ; coastal

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Expectancy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks have been known to survive for up to 15 years in the wild. Lifespan in the wild is often limited by trawl fishing.

Range lifespan
Status: wild:
15 (high) years.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Pliotrema warreni is characterized by a long, thin, and flattened snout. The snout is lined with alternating long and short teeth. Unusual nasal barbels protrude about halfway down the snout. Near the barbels are the ampullae of Lorenzini, which are specialized organs for detecting electrical fields. Two dorsal fins are present, with the second being slightly smaller than the first. They lack an anal fin. Five gill slits are present on each side of the head, while most sawsharks have gills on the bottom of the head. The upper body is a blotchy combination of dull yellow, grey, and brown.

Range mass: 18.7 lbs or 8.5 (high) kg.

Range length: 4.9 ft or 1.49 (high) m.

Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; heterothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Sexual Dimorphism: female larger

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Associations

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The main anti-predator adaptation of longnose sawsharks is their coloration. Their blotchy grey and brown markings help them blend in with the ocean floor. Human beings are the main predator of longnose sawsharks, although larger sharks are occasional predators. Humans have severely damaged shark populations due to commercial fishing.

Known Predators:

  • humans (Homo sapiens)
  • larger sharks (Chondrichthyes)

Anti-predator Adaptations: cryptic

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Longnose sawsharks breed seasonally. It is unknown if they are monogamous or promiscuous. It is unknown what affect mating behavior has on social structure.

Longnose sawsharks breed once every two years, and most breeding occurs in coastal areas. Each breeding season yields an average of 10 young (range of 3 to 22). The gestation period for longnose sawsharks is approximately 12 months. Longnose sawsharks are ovoviviparous, meaning that the eggs develop within the mother's body and then hatch within the mother before they are released.

Breeding interval: Individual longnose sawsharks breed biennially (in alternating years).

Breeding season: Longnose sawsharks have a yearly breeding/spawning season.

Range number of offspring: 3 to 22.

Average number of offspring: 10.

Average gestation period: 12 months.

Range time to independence: 1 to 2 years.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female): 2 years.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male): 2 years.

Key Reproductive Features: iteroparous ; seasonal breeding ; gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual ; fertilization (Internal ); ovoviviparous

In the pre-birth stage, while the young are still within the womb, nourishment and provisioning are provided by the mother. In the post-birth stage, the parents provide food and protection. The exact duration of parental investment is unknown, but it is complete before the individual's next breeding season.

Parental Investment: pre-hatching/birth (Provisioning: Female, Protecting); pre-weaning/fledging (Provisioning, Protecting)

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Krcmaric, D. 2006. "Pristiophorus cirratus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Pristiophorus_cirratus.html
author
Daniel Krcmaric, University of Notre Dame
editor
Karen Francl, Radford University
editor
Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Diagnostic Description

provided by FAO species catalogs
fieldmarks: Five pairs. of lateral gill slits, long, narrow sawshark snout 27 to 28% of total length, largely lanceolate denticles, two spineless dorsal fins, and no anal fin. Rostrum long, narrow, and narrowly tapering, length of preoral snout 27 to 29% of total length. Bases of rostral barbels about 1.2 to 1.3 times closer to rostral tip than mouth; distance from rostral barbels to nostrils slightly less or equal to distance from nostrils to first to fourth gill slits.

About 9 or 10 large rostral teeth on each side of rostrum in front of rostral barbels, 9 behind them.

Distance from mouth to nostrils 1.3 to 1.4 times internarial space.

Tooth rows 39 to 49 in upper jaw.

Dorsal and pectoral fins covered with denticles in large specimens.

Lateral trunk denticles largely unicuspidate.

First dorsal origin behind free rear tips of pectorals by eye length or slightly less.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
FAO species catalogue Vol.4. Sharks of the world. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Shark Species Known to Date Part 1 - Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. Compagno, L.J.V.1984FAO Fisheries Synopsis. , (125) Vol.4, Part 1.
author
Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
original
visit source
partner site
FAO species catalogs

Distribution

provided by FAO species catalogs
Western Pacific: Australia (South and Western Australia, New South Wales, Tasmania, Victoria), possibly the Philippines.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
FAO species catalogue Vol.4. Sharks of the world. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Shark Species Known to Date Part 1 - Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. Compagno, L.J.V.1984FAO Fisheries Synopsis. , (125) Vol.4, Part 1.
author
Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
original
visit source
partner site
FAO species catalogs

Size

provided by FAO species catalogs
Maximum total length about 137 cm, size at birth about 31 to 34 cm.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
FAO species catalogue Vol.4. Sharks of the world. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Shark Species Known to Date Part 1 - Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. Compagno, L.J.V.1984FAO Fisheries Synopsis. , (125) Vol.4, Part 1.
author
Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
original
visit source
partner site
FAO species catalogs

Brief Summary

provided by FAO species catalogs
A common temperate-subtropical sawshark of the continental shelf and upper slope of Australia, found near or on the bottom,from close inshore to at least 311 m depth. Occurs in bays and estuaries, but more abundant offshore at about 37 to 146 m on sandy or gravel-sand bottoms. Apparently occurs in schools or aggregates, possibly for feeding. Ovoviviparous, said to "breed in the winter month" (Whitley, 1940).

Eats small fishes, including coronet fishes (Fistularia), and crustaceans.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
FAO species catalogue Vol.4. Sharks of the world. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Shark Species Known to Date Part 1 - Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. Compagno, L.J.V.1984FAO Fisheries Synopsis. , (125) Vol.4, Part 1.
author
Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
original
visit source
partner site
FAO species catalogs

Benefits

provided by FAO species catalogs
This abundant small shark has formed the basis for a considerable bottom trawl fishery off southern Australia. Utilized fresh for human consumption. Apparently the meat of this shark is excellent eating.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
bibliographic citation
FAO species catalogue Vol.4. Sharks of the world. An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Shark Species Known to Date Part 1 - Hexanchiformes to Lamniformes. Compagno, L.J.V.1984FAO Fisheries Synopsis. , (125) Vol.4, Part 1.
author
Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN
original
visit source
partner site
FAO species catalogs

Diagnostic Description

provided by Fishbase
Pristiophorus cirratus has a long, narrow, and narrowly tapering rostrum (rostrum length is 27-29% of TL), distance from rostral tip to barbels about equal or slightly greater than distance from barbels to mouth (1:1.2-1.3); distance from rostral barbels to nostrils slightly less or equal to distance from nostrils to 1st to 4th gill slits. About 9-10 large rostral teeth on each side of the rostrum in front of the barbels, 9 behind them; distance from mouth to nostrils 1.3-1.4 times internarial space. Tooth rows 39-49 in upper jaw. Dorsal and pectoral fins covered with denticles in large specimens. Lateral trunk denticles largely unicuspidate. First dorsal fin origin behind free rear tips of pectorals by eye length or more (Ref. 247). P. cirratus has a body pattern of dark blotches (mostly darker bands between pectoral fin bases, over gill slits, between spiracles and below dorsal fins) and spots (occasionally faint). Nostrils, almost circular, are situated about 2/3 way from barbels to corner or mouth, width at nostrils more than 4.5 in preoral snout in adults; preoral snout length more than 2.3 times distance from barbels to snout tip (Ref. 6871). Rostral teeth with dark margins; underside abruptly uniformly white (Ref. 41394). First dorsal fin origin behind free rear tips of pectorals by eye length or more (Ref. 247). Caudal fin almost straight, with slender upper and lower lobes; pectoral well developed but are not ray-like (Ref. 6871).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Life Cycle

provided by Fishbase
Ovoviviparous, embryos feed solely on yolk (Ref. 50449). Males mature at about 97 cm, born at about 38 cm (Ref. 6871). Common sawshark lives for more than 15 years. Mature females appear to breed every 1-2 years, carrying from 3-22 young, with about 10 being the average. After 12 months' gestation, the pups are born in shallow coastal areas. They are about 11-14.5 in (27-37 cm) long at birth (Ref. 48640).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Trophic Strategy

provided by Fishbase
Found on the continental shelf and upper slope. Feeds on small fishes, including cornet fishes (Fistularia), and crustaceans.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Drina Sta. Iglesia
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Biology

provided by Fishbase
Found on the continental shelf and upper slope. Forms schools. Feeds on small fishes, including cornet fishes (Fistularia), and crustaceans. Ovoviviparous, with 3-22 young in a litter (48360). Size at birth about 31-34 cm. May live for more than 15 years. Meat marketed fresh and frozen.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Kent E. Carpenter
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Importance

provided by Fishbase
fisheries: commercial
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
FishBase
Recorder
Kent E. Carpenter
original
visit source
partner site
Fishbase

Eastern Australian sawshark

provided by wikipedia EN

The Eastern Australian sawshark, Pristiophorus peroniensis, is a sawshark of the family Pristiophoridae, found off southeastern mainland Australia at depths of between 100 and 630 m. Its length is up to 1.36 m.

Prior to its description in 2008, this species was known as Pristiophorus sp. A. This species is now considered to be a relative of Pristiophorus cirratus[1]

References

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Pristiophorus peroniensis" in FishBase. October 2013 version.
 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Eastern Australian sawshark: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Eastern Australian sawshark, Pristiophorus peroniensis, is a sawshark of the family Pristiophoridae, found off southeastern mainland Australia at depths of between 100 and 630 m. Its length is up to 1.36 m.

Prior to its description in 2008, this species was known as Pristiophorus sp. A. This species is now considered to be a relative of Pristiophorus cirratus

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Longnose sawshark

provided by wikipedia EN

The longnose sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) or common sawshark, is a sawshark of the family Pristiophoridae.

Description

The longnose sawshark has a slender, slightly flattened body[2] with a very long rostrum that can make up to 30% of its total body length. It has pale yellow or grayish-brown dorsal coloring, white ventral coloring, and variegated, sometimes faint dark blotches, spots, and bars on its back. The barbels of the longnose sawshark are halfway down the rostrum, but slightly closer to the rostral tip than the nostrils. Its maximum length is 1.37 m (4 ft 6 in).[3] The longnose sawshark can be confused with one of many species of sawfish, a family of rays, but is distinguished by the five gills located on the sides of its head, as opposed to sawfish which have gills located on the underside of the head.[2]

Distribution and habitat

The longnose sawshark is found in the eastern Indian Ocean around southern Australia and Tasmania on the continental shelf at depths of 20 - 600m.[4] While it may venture into bays and estuaries on occasion, longnose sawsharks prefer sandy and gravelly areas offshore between 37–146 m (121–479 ft).[5]

Biology and ecology

Longnose sawsharks feed primarily on small crustaceans.[6] Individuals find prey by running their barbels over the ocean floor. They use the teeth on their snouts to stir up sediment and strike prey.[2]

Like all sawsharks, reproduction is ovoviviparous. Longnose sawsharks give birth every other winter to between 6 and 19 pups in a litter.[7] After a 12-month gestation period, pups are born 27–37 cm (11–15 in) in length.[2] Their teeth are folded against the snout at birth, which protects the mother from harm. Longnose sawsharks are highly productive in comparison to other shark species, maturing quickly and only living for around 15 years.[7]

Human interaction

The longnose sawshark is listed as Least Concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). It used to be listed as Near Threatened, but data gathered after 2000 ultimately led to the new classification. Longnose sawsharks are highly productive and are protected by laws that keep their catch rate stable. Large tracts of their range are protected from all shark fishing, helping to buffer their population loss. Their meat is fairly popular in Australia and is said to have an excellent taste. Because of its deep habitat and overall behavior, the longnose sawshark is not a threat to humans.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b Walker, T.I. & Simpfendorfer, C. (SSG Australia & Oceania Regional Workshop, March 2003) (2003). "Pristiophorus cirratus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2003. Retrieved 2013-01-20.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)old-form url
  2. ^ a b c d Tricas, Timothy C.; Kevin Deacon; Peter Last; John E. McCosker; Terence I. Walker (1997). Taylor, Leighton (ed.). The Nature Company Guides: Sharks & Rays. Sydney: Time-Life Books. pp. 140. ISBN 0-7835-4940-7.
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2006). "Pristiophorus cirratus" in FishBase. May 2006 version.
  4. ^ https://www.publish.csiro.au/mf/MF19277
  5. ^ Compagno, Leonardo, Dando, Marc and Fowler, Sarah. Sharks of the World. Princeton University Press. 2005. pg 132.
  6. ^ Raoult, Vincent; Gaston, Troy F.; Williamson, Jane E. (2015). "Not all sawsharks are equal: Species of co-existing sawsharks show plasticity in trophic consumption both within and between species". Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. 72 (11): 1769–1775. doi:10.1139/cjfas-2015-0307. hdl:1807/69872.
  7. ^ a b http://species-identification.org/species.php?species_group=sharks&id=225

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Longnose sawshark: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The longnose sawshark (Pristiophorus cirratus) or common sawshark, is a sawshark of the family Pristiophoridae.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN