dcsimg

Life Cycle

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Oviparous, paired eggs are laid. Embryos feed solely on yolk (Ref. 50449). Distinct pairing with embrace. Young may tend to follow large objects, such as their mother (Ref. 205).
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Recorder
Cristina V. Garilao
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Trophic Strategy

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Inhabits deep slope waters. Feeds on all kinds of bottom animals.
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Drina Sta. Iglesia
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Biology

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Inhabit deep slope waters (Ref. 3167), probably most common on the mid-slope (Ref. 114953). Feed on all kinds of bottom animals (Ref. 3167), mainly invertebrates and small fishes (Ref. 114953). Size possibly up to 250 cm TL (Ref. 114953). Oviparous. Distinct pairing with embrace. Young may tend to follow large objects, such as their mother (Ref. 205). Eggs are oblong capsules with stiff pointed horns at the corners deposited in sandy or muddy flats (Ref. 205). Egg capsules are 18.2-26.0 cm long and 9.2-11.3 cm wide (Ref. 41251, 41309). Sizes of maturity and hatching unknown (Ref. 114953).
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Crispina B. Binohlan
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Importance

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fisheries: of no interest
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Crispina B. Binohlan
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Dipturus nidarosiensis

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The Norwegian skate (Dipturus nidarosiensis), or black skate, is a species of skate found at depths of 200 m (660 ft) to over 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in the East Atlantic region.[1][2][3] Initially its range was believed to be restricted to the Norwegian Sea and North Sea to the Bay of Biscay. It is occasionally encountered off the western coast of Ireland, and historically has been found near Rockall and in the Norwegian Deep, though recent surveys have not identified the species there.[1] The species has frequently been confused with other skates, and since the late 1980s it has been confirmed to occur more widely, ranging from Iceland to Morocco, as well as off South Africa and in the Mediterranean Sea.[4][5]

This very large skate can reach a total length of up to 2.3 m (7.5 ft).[1] Females grow larger than males.[6] It is all dark brown-grey above, lacking distinct patterns. Its underparts are dark brown and often covered in blackish mucus, which separates it from some other skates in its range where adults generally have pale underparts (an exception is D. oxyrinchus, which however can be distinguished by its narrower snout).[5] At least in the Mediterranean the primary prey are decapod crustaceans, followed by bony fish, while cephalopods, small elasmobranchs and polychaetes occasionally are consumed.[6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Stehmann, M.F.W.; Ellis, J.; Walls, R.; Lynghammar, A. (2015). "Dipturus nidarosiensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2015: e.T161729A48927468. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-1.RLTS.T161729A48927468.en. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b Bailly, N. (2013). "Dipturus nidarosiensis (Storm, 1881)". FishBase, World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 8 April 2014.
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2017). "Dipturus nidarosiensis" in FishBase. December 2017 version.
  4. ^ Cannas, R.; Follesa, M. C.; Cabiddu, S.; Porcu, C.; Salvadori, S.; Iglésias, S. P.; Deiana, A. M.; Cau, A. (2010). "Molecular and morphological evidence of the occurrence of the Norwegian skate Dipturus nidarosiensis (Storm, 1881) in the Mediterranean Sea". Marine Biology Research. 6 (4): 341. doi:10.1080/17451000903428496.
  5. ^ a b Last, P.R.; White, W.T.; de Carvalho, M.R.; Séret, B.; Stehmann, M.F.W.; Naylor, G.J.P., eds. (2016). Rays of the World. CSIRO Special Publication. p. 266. ISBN 9781501705328.
  6. ^ a b Follesa, M.C.; R. Cannas; S. Cabiddu; A. Cau; A. Mulas; C. Porcu; A. Cau (2010). "Preliminary observations of the reproductive biology and diet for the Norwegian skate Dipturus nidarosiensis (Rajidae) from the Central Western Mediterranean Sea". Cybium. 36 (3): 473–477.
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Dipturus nidarosiensis: Brief Summary

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The Norwegian skate (Dipturus nidarosiensis), or black skate, is a species of skate found at depths of 200 m (660 ft) to over 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in the East Atlantic region. Initially its range was believed to be restricted to the Norwegian Sea and North Sea to the Bay of Biscay. It is occasionally encountered off the western coast of Ireland, and historically has been found near Rockall and in the Norwegian Deep, though recent surveys have not identified the species there. The species has frequently been confused with other skates, and since the late 1980s it has been confirmed to occur more widely, ranging from Iceland to Morocco, as well as off South Africa and in the Mediterranean Sea.

This very large skate can reach a total length of up to 2.3 m (7.5 ft). Females grow larger than males. It is all dark brown-grey above, lacking distinct patterns. Its underparts are dark brown and often covered in blackish mucus, which separates it from some other skates in its range where adults generally have pale underparts (an exception is D. oxyrinchus, which however can be distinguished by its narrower snout). At least in the Mediterranean the primary prey are decapod crustaceans, followed by bony fish, while cephalopods, small elasmobranchs and polychaetes occasionally are consumed.

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