dcsimg

Life Cycle

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Exhibit ovoviparity (aplacental viviparity), with embryos feeding initially on yolk, then receiving additional nourishment from the mother by indirect absorption of uterine fluid enriched with mucus, fat or protein through specialised structures (Ref. 50449). Born at 38-40 cm TL (Ref.58048).
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Recorder
Susan M. Luna
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Trophic Strategy

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Adults found on the continental shelf down to 100 m. Juveniles found inshore around atolls, in mangrove swamps and occasionally enter estuaries . Feeds on shellfish. Reported to live and breed permanently in freshwater.
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Drina Sta. Iglesia
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Biology

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Occurs inshore and offshore, from the intertidal to offshore continental and insular shelves (Ref. 9909). Adults are found offshore waters while young individuals are found inshore on sand flats, around atolls, and in mangrove swamps (Ref. 6871). Feeds on shellfish, mainly on prawns and crabs (Ref. 9909, Ref. 114953). Ovoviviparous (Ref. 50449). Maturity size at 150-180 cm TL; born at 38-40 cm TL (Ref. 114953). Reported to live and breed permanently in fresh water (Ref. 6871). Probably the major commercial guitarfish in the Western Central Pacific (Ref. 9909). Caught regularly by demersal tangle net fisheries operating throughout the area. Utilized for its meat, fins (both very high value), skin and cartilage (Ref.58048). Reported to attain a maximum length of 4 m (Ref. 58784).
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Importance

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fisheries: minor commercial; aquarium: commercial; price category: low; price reliability: questionable: based on ex-vessel price for species in this genus
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Common shovelnose ray

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The common shovelnose ray, giant shovelnose ray or giant guitarfish (Glaucostegus typus) is a species of fish in the Rhinobatidae family found in the central Indo-Pacific, ranging from India to the East China Sea, Solomon Islands and northern Australia.[1][3][4] It is found in shallow coastal areas to a depth of at least 100 m (330 ft), including mangrove, estuaries and reportedly also in freshwaters.[1][3][4] It reaches up to 2.7 m (8.9 ft) in length, and is greyish-brown to yellowish-brown above with a paler snout.[4]

This species has been tested for colour vision using choice experiments that control for brightness. It was the first rigorous behvioural evidence for colour vision in any elasmobranch.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b c Kyne, P.M.; Rigby, C.L.; Dharmadi, Gutteridge, A.N.; Jabado, R.W. (2019). "Glaucostegus typus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2019: e.T104061138A68623995. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2019-2.RLTS.T104061138A68623995.en. Retrieved 16 November 2021.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ "Appendices | CITES". cites.org. Retrieved 2022-01-14.
  3. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer; Pauly, Daniel (eds.) (2017). "Glaucostegus typus" in FishBase. July 2017 version.
  4. ^ a b c Last; White; de Carvalho; Séret; Stehmann; Naylor, eds. (2016). Rays of the World. CSIRO. p. 116. ISBN 9780643109148.
  5. ^ Van-Eyk, S. M.; Siebeck, U. E.; Champ, C. M.; Marshall, J.; Hart, N. S. (2011). "Behavioural evidence for colour vision in an elasmobranch" (PDF). The Journal of Experimental Biology. 214 (24): 4186–4192. doi:10.1242/jeb.061853. PMID 22116761.
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Common shovelnose ray: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The common shovelnose ray, giant shovelnose ray or giant guitarfish (Glaucostegus typus) is a species of fish in the Rhinobatidae family found in the central Indo-Pacific, ranging from India to the East China Sea, Solomon Islands and northern Australia. It is found in shallow coastal areas to a depth of at least 100 m (330 ft), including mangrove, estuaries and reportedly also in freshwaters. It reaches up to 2.7 m (8.9 ft) in length, and is greyish-brown to yellowish-brown above with a paler snout.

This species has been tested for colour vision using choice experiments that control for brightness. It was the first rigorous behvioural evidence for colour vision in any elasmobranch.

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