dcsimg

Conservation Status

provided by University of Alberta Museums
No conservation concerns.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Cyclicity

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Adults are on the wing late May to July.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Distribution

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Fom the Maritimes west across southern Canada to southeastern BC. In Alberta, found throughout the aspen parklands, southern boreal forest, foothills and lower elevations in the mountains. It apparently does not occur as far north in the Boreal region as F. scolopendrina and F. occidentalis.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

General Description

provided by University of Alberta Museums
A medium-sized (3.5-4.0 cm. wingspan) grey-black and white moth, with a cream or light tan cast to the white areas of the forewings. A broad black band crosses the median area of the forewings. It usually narrows in the middle, and in many specimens is divided into two wedge-shaped patches. Modesta can be separated from other Furcula sp. by the absence of yellow or gold scaling on the forewing where the lines cross the veins. Male modesta can also be separated from the other species of Furcula by the diamond shape of the laterally flattened uncus.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Habitat

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Deciduous woodland and shrub.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Life Cycle

provided by University of Alberta Museums
Adults are nocturnal and come to light. The larvae are solitary defoliators. There is a single brood which overwinters in the pupal stage.
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums

Trophic Strategy

provided by University of Alberta Museums
No Alberta data. Elsewhere reported larval hosts include aspen poplar (Populus tremuloides) and willows (Salix).
license
cc-by-nc
copyright
University of Alberta Museums