dcsimg

Behavior

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Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

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Dewey, T. . "Esociformes" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Esociformes.html
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Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Morphology

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Other Physical Features: bilateral symmetry

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Dewey, T. . "Esociformes" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Esociformes.html
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Tanya Dewey, Animal Diversity Web
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Esociformes

provided by wikipedia EN

The Esociformes /ˈsɒsɪfɔːrmz/ are a small order of ray-finned fish, with two families, Umbridae and Esocidae. The pikes of genus Esox give the order its name.

This order is closely related to the Salmoniformes, the two comprising the superorder Protacanthopterygii, and are often included in their order. The esociform fishes first appeared in the mid-Cretaceous — early products of the Euteleost radiation of that time. Today, they are found in weed-choked freshwater habitats in North America and northern Eurasia.

Esocidae

The three extant esocid genera (Esox, Novumbra, and Dallia) together comprise a holarctic distribution. Two additional genera have been described from fossils dating to the Cretaceous of North America.

Umbridae

Umbra remains the only extant species in this family, and can be found in eastern North America and Europe. Three additional genera have been described from fossils dating from the Paleocene of Europe; however, genetic studies on the extant species of Umbra have recovered a split between the North American and European species dating to the Late Cretaceous and earliest half of the Paleogene.[1]

Relationships

While the family Esocidae traditionally only contained the genus Esox, recent genetic and paleontological research have recovered Novumbra and Dallia as members of the family Esocidae, being closer related to Esox than Umbra. Umbra is the only remaining extant species in Umbridae.[1] Various fossils have been described as members of Esociformes and are placed on the following tree accordingly.

Esociformes Esocidae        

Esox Esox lucius1.jpg

     

Novumbra Novumbra oregonensis.png

     

Dallia Dallia pectoralis (line art).jpg

       

Oldmanesox

   

Estesesox

      Umbridae

Boltyshia

     

PalaeoesoxPalaeoesox fritzschei.jpg

     

Proumbra

     

Umbra Umbra krameri Lápi póc.jpg

           

References

  1. ^ a b Marić, Saša; Stanković, David; Wanzenböck, Josef; Šanda, Radek; Erős, Tibor; Takács, Péter; Specziár, András; Sekulić, Nenad; Bănăduc, Doru; Ćaleta, Marko; Trombitsky, Ilya (May 2017). "Phylogeography and population genetics of the European mudminnow (Umbra krameri) with a time-calibrated phylogeny for the family Umbridae". Hydrobiologia. 792 (1): 151–168. doi:10.1007/s10750-016-3051-9. ISSN 0018-8158.
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Esociformes: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The Esociformes /ˈiːsɒsɪfɔːrmiːz/ are a small order of ray-finned fish, with two families, Umbridae and Esocidae. The pikes of genus Esox give the order its name.

This order is closely related to the Salmoniformes, the two comprising the superorder Protacanthopterygii, and are often included in their order. The esociform fishes first appeared in the mid-Cretaceous — early products of the Euteleost radiation of that time. Today, they are found in weed-choked freshwater habitats in North America and northern Eurasia.

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