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Sweet Autumn Virginsbower

Clematis terniflora DC.

Comments

provided by eFloras
Clematis terniflora is commonly cultivated as an ornamental. It is widely naturalized in the eastern United States. The name C . paniculata J. F. Gmelin was incorrectly used for this species by Thunberg in 1794.

Some authors have recognized two or more varieties in this species, correlated with their distribution in Asia, but in the study by H.Hara (1975), all of the varietal names were reduced to synonymy.

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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
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Flora of North America Editorial Committee
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eFloras.org
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Description

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Stems climbing with tendril-like petioles and leaf rachises, 3-6 m. Leaf blade pinnately 3- or 5-foliolate; leaflets ovate or broadly lanceolate to narrowly deltate, to 6.5 × 3.5 cm, margins entire; surfaces abaxially glabrous or very sparingly appressed-strigose on major veins. Inflorescences axillary, 3-12-flowered cymes or compound cymes or paniculate with cymose subunits. Flowers bisexual, often some unisexual (staminate) in same inflorescence; pedicel 1-3.5 cm, slender; sepals wide-spreading, not recurved, white, linear or elliptic to lanceolate or narrowly obovate, 0.9-2.2 cm, length ca. 2-3 times width, abaxially tomentose along margins, adaxially glabrous; stamens ca. 50; filaments glabrous; staminodes absent; pistils 5-10. Achenes broad, flat, conspicuously rimmed, minutely appressed-silky, sometimes sparsely so; beak 2-6 cm.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Description

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Vines woody. Branches shallowly 4--10-grooved, puberulous or only nodes puberulous. Leaves pinnate, 5(--7)-foliolate; petiole 2.5--4.5 cm; leaflet blades ovate to narrowly ovate, sometimes ovate-lanceolate, 2.5--8 × 1--4.2 cm, papery to subleathery, both surfaces sparsely puberulous, glabrescent, base rounded, subcordate, or broadly cuneate, margin entire, apex acute to obtuse; basal veins abaxially ± prominent to nearly flat. Cymes axillary or terminal, usually many flowered; peduncle 1--7 cm; bracts linear, elliptic, or oblong, 0.8--3.5(--5) cm. Flowers 1.4--3 cm in diam. Pedicel 0.5--3 cm, puberulous or glabrous. Sepals 4, white, spreading, obovate-oblong to oblong, 5--15 × 2--6 mm, abaxially puberulous or glabrous, adaxially glabrous, margin abaxially velutinous, apex ± acute to obtuse. Stamens 3--7(--8) mm, glabrous; anthers narrowly oblong to oblong, 2--3 mm, apex obtuse or minutely apiculate. Ovaries pubescent. Style 4--7 mm, densely villous. Achenes orange-yellow, broadly elliptic to obovate, 4--9 × 2.5--6 mm, appressed pubescent; persistent style 1.2--4 cm, plumose. Fl. Jun--Aug, fr. Aug--Nov.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 357 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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C. China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan; planted around Kathmandu.
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
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Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
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K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
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eFloras.org
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Distribution

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introduced; Ont.; Ala., Ark., Conn., Fla., Ga., Ill., Ind., Kans., Ky., La., Md., Mass., Miss., Mo., Nebr., N.H., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Pa., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Va., W.Va.; native to Asia (China, Korea, Japan).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Distribution

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S Anhui, Heilongjiang, S Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Jilin, Liaoning, Nei Mongol, SE Shaanxi, S Taiwan, Zhejiang [Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russia (Siberia)].
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 357 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
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eFloras

Elevation Range

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1400-1600 m
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal Vol. 0 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Annotated Checklist of the Flowering Plants of Nepal @ eFloras.org
author
K.K. Shrestha, J.R. Press and D.A. Sutton
project
eFloras.org
original
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eFloras

Flowering/Fruiting

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Flowering summer (Jul-Sep).
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Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
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eFloras

Habitat

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Roadsides, thickets, and other secondary sites, edges of woods near creeks; 0-1000m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Habitat

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Forest margins, scrub on slopes, grassy areas on hills, among rocks in coastal areas; near sea level to 800 m.
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of China Vol. 6: 357 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of China @ eFloras.org
editor
Wu Zhengyi, Peter H. Raven & Hong Deyuan
project
eFloras.org
original
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partner site
eFloras

Synonym

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Clematis dioscoreifolia H. Léveillé & Vaniot; C. dioscoreifolia var. robusta (Carr) Rehder; C. maximowicziana Franchet & Savatier
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cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA
bibliographic citation
Flora of North America Vol. 3 in eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden. Accessed Nov 12, 2008.
source
Flora of North America @ eFloras.org
editor
Flora of North America Editorial Committee
project
eFloras.org
original
visit source
partner site
eFloras

Clematis terniflora

provided by wikipedia EN

Clematis terniflora (sweet autumn clematis, sweet autumn virginsbower) is a plant in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. It is native to northeastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russia (Siberia), Taiwan).[1] It was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s as an ornamental garden plant, and has naturalized in many of the eastern states. It is considered a Category II invasive plant in Florida (north and central[2]) and some other eastern states, meaning invading native plant communities but not yet seen as displacing native species.[3][4]

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clematis

Description

Clematis terniflora is a vine with opposite, pinnately compound leaves, on climbing stems. The flowers are white, borne in fall.[3] The blooms are nicely fragrant and visited by bees. In late fall the fertilized flowers become fruit (seed) clusters of 5-6 fruits connected at the heads and each having a long white tail. As these dry, the color of the fruits fade and the tail becomes feather-like. In the spring the fruits detach and are dispersed by wind.

Culture

Prefers full sun, but will prosper and bloom in partial shade. These woody-stemmed plants can be pruned in fall or early spring to within a couple of feet from the ground, and will vine up fence, trellis, arbors (or other plants) to heights of 10 to 30 feet. Can also be allowed to sprawl along the ground as a dense ground cover. Blooms on new growth. No serious insect or disease problems. Does not require fertilizer or frequent watering, although will benefit from a low nitrogen fertilizer such as 5-10-10 in spring. Considered deer resistant.[3][5]

References

  1. ^ "Clematis terniflora". Flora of China. Retrieved 12 May 2013.
  2. ^ "List of invasive plant species" (PDF). FLEPPC website. Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council. 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Clematis terniflora Missouri Botanical Garden
  4. ^ Sweet Autumn Virginsbower (Clematis terniflora) Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States
  5. ^ Sweet autumn clematis The Morton Arboritum, Lisle, IL.

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Clematis terniflora: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Clematis terniflora (sweet autumn clematis, sweet autumn virginsbower) is a plant in the buttercup family, Ranunculaceae. It is native to northeastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Russia (Siberia), Taiwan). It was introduced into the United States in the late 1800s as an ornamental garden plant, and has naturalized in many of the eastern states. It is considered a Category II invasive plant in Florida (north and central) and some other eastern states, meaning invading native plant communities but not yet seen as displacing native species.

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