dcsimg

Life Cycle

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Development - Life Cycle: metamorphosis

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Heying, H. 2003. "Ambystomatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Ambystomatidae.html
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Heather Heying
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Morphology

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Other Physical Features: ectothermic ; bilateral symmetry

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Heying, H. 2003. "Ambystomatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Ambystomatidae.html
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Heather Heying
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Reproduction

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Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate)

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The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Heying, H. 2003. "Ambystomatidae" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Ambystomatidae.html
author
Heather Heying
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Ambystomatidae

provided by wikipedia EN

Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders belonging to the order Caudata in the class Amphibia. It contains two genera, Ambystoma (the mole salamanders) and Dicamptodon (the Pacific giant salamanders). These salamanders are mostly terrestrial and eat invertebrates, although some species are known to eat smaller salamanders. They can be found throughout the US and some areas of Canada in damp forests or plains. This family contains some of the largest terrestrial salamanders in the world, the tiger salamander and the coastal giant salamander. Some species are toxic and can secrete poison from their bodies as protection against predators or infraspecific competition. Neoteny has been observed in several species in Ambystomatidae, and some of them like the axolotl live all of their lives under water in their larval stage.

Taxonomy

The genus Rhyacotriton was formerly included in this family, but is now usually placed into its own family Rhyacotritonidae. In 2006, a large study of amphibian systematics (Frost et al., Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 297 (2006) placed Dicamptodon back within Ambystomatidae, based on cladistic analysis. This has been accepted by the Center for Indian Herpetology.

References

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Ambystomatidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Ambystomatidae is a family of salamanders belonging to the order Caudata in the class Amphibia. It contains two genera, Ambystoma (the mole salamanders) and Dicamptodon (the Pacific giant salamanders). These salamanders are mostly terrestrial and eat invertebrates, although some species are known to eat smaller salamanders. They can be found throughout the US and some areas of Canada in damp forests or plains. This family contains some of the largest terrestrial salamanders in the world, the tiger salamander and the coastal giant salamander. Some species are toxic and can secrete poison from their bodies as protection against predators or infraspecific competition. Neoteny has been observed in several species in Ambystomatidae, and some of them like the axolotl live all of their lives under water in their larval stage.

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