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Palaeoheterodonta Newell 1965

Palaeoheterodonta

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Palaeoheterodonta is a subclass of bivalve molluscs.[1] It contains the extant orders Unionida (freshwater mussels) and Trigoniida. They are distinguished by having the two halves of the shell be of equal size and shape, but by having the hinge teeth be in a single row, rather than separated into two groups, as they are in the clams and cockles.[2]

2010 Taxonomy of the Palaeoheterodonta

In 2010 a new proposed classification system for the Bivalvia was published in by Bieler, Carter & Coan revising the classification of the Bivalvia, including the subclass Paleoheterodonta.[3] Superfamilies and families as listed by Bieler et al. Use of indicate families and superfamilies that are extinct.

Subclass: Palaeoheterodonta

Order: Trigoniida[4]

Order: Unionida[5]

References

  1. ^ Palaeoheterodonta Newell, 1965. Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 9 July 2010.
  2. ^ Barnes, Robert D. (1982). Invertebrate Zoology. Philadelphia, PA: Holt-Saunders International. p. 340. ISBN 0-03-056747-5.
  3. ^ Bieler, R., Carter, J.G. & Coan, E.V. (2010) Classification of Bivalve families. Pp. 113-133, in: Bouchet, P. & Rocroi, J.P. (2010), Nomenclator of Bivalve Families. Malacologia 52(2): 1-184
  4. ^ Trigonioida Newell, 1965. Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 3 February 2009.
  5. ^ Unionoida Stoliczka, 1871. Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 3 February 2009.
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Palaeoheterodonta: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

Palaeoheterodonta is a subclass of bivalve molluscs. It contains the extant orders Unionida (freshwater mussels) and Trigoniida. They are distinguished by having the two halves of the shell be of equal size and shape, but by having the hinge teeth be in a single row, rather than separated into two groups, as they are in the clams and cockles.

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