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Brief Summary

provided by Ecomare
The tub gurnard is the largest gurnard species found in the North Sea: it can grow up to 75 centimeters long. It is a benthic fish which eats primarily crabs, shrimp and small lobsters; it will also eat worms and molluscs. Adults eat flatfish. Tub gurnard overwinter in warm seawater: from the coast of Morocco to the English Channel. In the spring, this fish migrates to more northerly waters as far as the pole circle, and including the North Sea. Tub gurnard are often caught by the fisheries while fishing for flatfish. They receive a good price at the market.
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Diagnostic Description

provided by FAO species catalogs
Head large, triangular, bony, with many ridges and spines, but without a deep groove.

Total gillrakers on first gill arch 7 to 11 (not including rudiments).

Two separate dorsal fins, the first with 8 to 10 spines, the second with 16 or 17 segmented soft rays; anterior edge of first dorsal spine smooth. Anal fin with 14 to 16 segmented soft rays.

Cleithral spine (above pectoral fin) short.

Body scales small, 18 to 20 rows above, and 37 to 60 rows below lateral line; lateral line scales small, composed of unmodified tubes; scales absent from breast and anterior part of belly.

Colour pink or reddish brown, sometimes mottled on back, golden to white ventrally; outer face of pectoral fins pinkish violet or blue, spotted with white or green, and light blue or red on margins; inner face often with a bluish-black blotch and small white spots.

Size

provided by FAO species catalogs
Maximum 75 cm; common to 35 cm.

Brief Summary

provided by FAO species catalogs
Benthic on the continental shelf.From about 20 to 300 m. depth. Usually inhabits sand, muddy sand or gravel bottoms.Occurs at temperatures ranging from 8.0 to 24.0° C.

Feeds on fish, crustaceans and molluscs.Has three isolated rays on the pectoral fin which function as legs on which the fish rests and also help in locating food on the bottom.Maximum weight: 6 kg. Maximum reported age: 14 years.

Benefits

provided by FAO species catalogs
Caught with bottom trawls. Separate statistics are not reported for this species. An excellent food fish. Marketed fresh or frozen. Eaten pan-fried, broiled, microwaved or baked. Also smoked, but also reduced to fishmeal and oil by offshore fleets.

Diagnostic Description

provided by Fishbase
Longest ray in the pectoral fin reaching the front part of the anal fin. Lateral line scales smooth. Reddish color (Ref. 35388).
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Recorder
Arlene G. Sampang-Reyes
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Life Cycle

provided by Fishbase
Distinct pairing during breeding (Ref. 205).
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Susan M. Luna
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Trophic Strategy

provided by Fishbase
Feeds on fish and benthic organisms (Ref. 4944).
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Pascualita Sa-a
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Biology

provided by Fishbase
Occurs at temperatures ranging from 8.0-24.0 °C (Ref. 4944). Inhabits sand, muddy sand or gravel bottoms. Up to depth of 318 m in the eastern Ionian Sea (Ref. 56504). Feeds on fish, crustaceans and mollusks. Has three isolated rays on the pectoral fin which function as legs on which the fish rests and also help in locating food on the soft bottom (Ref. 9988). Marketed fresh or frozen; eaten pan-fried, broiled, microwaved or baked (Ref. 9988).
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Importance

provided by Fishbase
fisheries: commercial; gamefish: yes; aquarium: public aquariums
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Tub gurnard

provided by wikipedia EN

The tub gurnard, Chelidonichthys lucerna (also C. lucernus, Trigla lucerna, T. corax) is a species of bottom-dwelling coastal fish with a spiny armored head and fingerlike pectoral fins used for crawling along the sea bottom. The tub gurnard is a reddish fish with blue pectoral fins.

It is a coastal species, prevalent in the Mediterranean Sea (especially the western Mediterranean and the northern Aegean) and the Atlantic Ocean from Norway to Cape Blanc. It is also present, though less common, in the Black Sea, the southern Baltic and the eastern Mediterranean.[1]

It has a long mating season, from May to August in Europe, ranging to year-round in Africa.[2]

References

  1. ^ AquaMaps distribution map
  2. ^ "Rode Poon" (in Dutch).

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Tub gurnard: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The tub gurnard, Chelidonichthys lucerna (also C. lucernus, Trigla lucerna, T. corax) is a species of bottom-dwelling coastal fish with a spiny armored head and fingerlike pectoral fins used for crawling along the sea bottom. The tub gurnard is a reddish fish with blue pectoral fins.

It is a coastal species, prevalent in the Mediterranean Sea (especially the western Mediterranean and the northern Aegean) and the Atlantic Ocean from Norway to Cape Blanc. It is also present, though less common, in the Black Sea, the southern Baltic and the eastern Mediterranean.

It has a long mating season, from May to August in Europe, ranging to year-round in Africa.

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On a fish market

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Swimming

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Frying fillets with butter and sage

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