dcsimg

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

provided by AnAge articles
Maximum longevity: 22.1 years (captivity) Observations: In captivity, the koala may live up to 22.1 years (Richard Weigl 2005).
license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Joao Pedro de Magalhaes
editor
de Magalhaes, J. P.
partner site
AnAge articles

Untitled

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Two interesting adaptations of the koala are: "Cheek pouches that allow the animal to store unchewed food while moving to a safer or more protected location.

The koala cools itself by licking its arms and stretching out as it rests in the trees (koalas have no sweat glands) (LPZ, 1997)."

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Behavior

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Perception Channels: tactile ; chemical

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Conservation Status

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The koala holds no special status although the Environment Australia Biodiversity Group calls the koala lower risk--near threatened (1996). Koalas were nearly exterminated at the turn of the century because they were hunted for their fur, and because their environments were destroyed by fires caused by humans. After1927 as a result of public outcry the koala became legally protected. Currently their main threat is habitat destruction. Management of the koala can be difficult. Populations that are protected can reach such high numbers in an area that they destroy the trees on which they feed. Often portions of populations have to be relocated in order to reduce the number of individuals in a given area. However, this is complicated by the shortage of suitable forest areas where surplus animals can be released (MacDonald, 1984).

They are also threatened by the microorganism Chlamydia psittaci, which can make them sterile.

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: least concern

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

none noted

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Benefits

provided by Animal Diversity Web

In the early 20th century the koala was hunted extensively for its warm, thick coat. However, they are now protected and can no longer be hunted.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Trophic Strategy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Koalas are herbivorous feeding on both eucalypt and non-eucalypt species. However the bulk of their diet comes from only a few eucalypt species. Eucalyptus viminalis and E. ovata are preferred in the south, while E. punctata, E. camaldulensis and E. tereticornis are the taste of the north (MacDonald, 1984). The leaves are highly toxic; the animals get around this by having a flora of bacteria in their stomachs that metabolize the toxins of the leaves. Koalas have a highly specialized diet in which they eat only 20 of the 350 species of eucalyptus and prefer only 5 species. They feed at night. An adult koala can eat 500g daily. The koala has adapted to cope with its high fiber, low protein diet. "The cheek teeth are reduced to a single premolar and four broad, highly cusped molars on each jaw which finely grind the leaves for easier digestion (MacDonald, 1984)." In addition the koala's caecum is up to four times its body size.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Distribution

provided by Animal Diversity Web

The koalas live in eastern Australia and range from northern Queensland to southwestern Victoria. They have been introduced to western Australia and nearby islands (LPZ, 1997).

Biogeographic Regions: australian (Native )

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Habitat

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Koalas are arboreal, remaining mostly in the branches of the eucalyptus trees, where they are able to feed and stay out of reach of their predators. The koala is confined to eucalyptus forests below 600 m.

Terrestrial Biomes: forest

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Life Expectancy

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
15.0 years.

Average lifespan
Status: wild:
13.0 years.

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
18.0 years.

Average lifespan
Status: wild:
17.0 years.

Average lifespan
Status: captivity:
20.0 years.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Morphology

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Koalas from the southern end of the range are generally larger in size than their northern counterparts. In both areas they exhibit sexual dimorphism with the males being larger. In the south, males have an average head-body length of 78 cm and females 72 cm (MacDonald, 1984). The koala's have a vestigial tail. Average weights are: in the south, males--11.8 kg, females--7.9 kg; in the north, males--6.5 kg, females 5.1 kg (MacDonald, 1984) "Males are up to 50% heavier than females, have a broader face, somewhat smaller ears, and a large chest gland (MacDonald, 1984)." Females have two mammae; and rather than a chest gland, have a pouch that opens to the rear and extends upward and forward (Nowak, 1997). Koalas have dense, wooly fur that is gray to brown on top and varies with geographic location. There is white on the chin, chest and inner side of the forelimbs(MacDonald, 1984). The rump is often dappled with white patches and the ears are fringed with long white hairs (MacDonald, 1984). The coat is generally shorther and lighter in the north of range. The paws are large, and both fore and hind feet have five strongly clawed digits. On the forepaw the first and second digits oppose the other three which enables the koala to grip branches as it climbs. The first digit of the hind foot is short and greatly broadened while the second and third digits are relatively small and partly syndactylous but have separate claws (Nowak, 1997).

Range mass: 5.1 to 11.8 kg.

Other Physical Features: endothermic ; bilateral symmetry

Average basal metabolic rate: 5.744 W.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Reproduction

provided by Animal Diversity Web

Females are sexually mature at two years of age. Males are fertile at two years but usually don't mate until they reach four simply because competition for females requires larger size. Females are seasonally polyestrous, with an estrous cycle of about 27-30 days, and usually breed once every year (Nowak, 1997). The gestation period is 25-35 days with births occurring in mid-summer (December-January). Litters generally consist of only one young but twins have been reported (Nowak, 1997). The young weigh less than 0.5 grams when born, and attach to one of the nipples in the pouch. Young have a pouch life of 5-7 months, feeding on milk or predigested leaves that are nontoxic, and are weaned at 6-12 months (Nowak, 1997). Toward the end of their pouch life the young feed regularly on material passed through the mother's digestive tract (Nowak, 1997). Once the young begins to feed on leaves growth is rapid. The young leaves the pouch after seven months and is carried about on the mother's back. By eleven month's of age the young is independent, but may continue to live close to the mother for a few months. Koalas may live past 10 years in the wild, and there have been reports of life spans over 20 years in captivity.

Key Reproductive Features: gonochoric/gonochoristic/dioecious (sexes separate); sexual

Average birth mass: 0.36 g.

Average gestation period: 31 days.

Average number of offspring: 1.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (male)
Sex: male:
1095 days.

Average age at sexual or reproductive maturity (female)
Sex: female:
646 days.

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
The Regents of the University of Michigan and its licensors
bibliographic citation
Dubuc, J. and D. Eckroad 1999. "Phascolarctos cinereus" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed April 27, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Phascolarctos_cinereus.html
author
Jennifer Dubuc, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
author
Dana Eckroad, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
original
visit source
partner site
Animal Diversity Web

Biology

provided by Arkive
Koalas are primarily nocturnal, spending most of their time in the branches of trees where they can feed, rest and gain some protection from ground-dwelling predators (6). Much of a koala's time is spent sleeping, and when awake they are still a fairly sedentary species. An adult consumes about 500g of fresh leaves per day (3). Koalas feed on a variety of trees, but the bulk of their diet comes from only a few eucalypt species (6), with marked local and regional differences for the species of eucalypts preferred (5). Eucalyptus leaves are very fibrous and highly toxic, but koalas have evolved to cope with these problems with special cheek teeth that grind the leaves into a fine paste, which is then digested by microbes in the caecum part of the intestine which is unusually long, at around 200cm, and has a blind end, unlike the caecum in most other mammals. Some of the poisons are detoxified in the liver. The diet does not provide much energy, but the long periods spent sleeping, along with their relatively small brains, help compensate for this (3). There is also evidence that suggests koalas may perform myrecism - regurgitating and re-chewing partially digested food, which extracts more energy from the food (7). Both males and females reach sexual maturity at around two years old, but males are rarely large enough to compete for mating access until four years old. Females normally give birth to one young every year but in older females this may reduce to one every two years. The newborn 'joey' is underdeveloped and crawls rapidly through the mother's fur to her pouch, where it suckles for six months. During weaning, in addition to milk, the joey feeds on a substance called 'pap' which is a liquefied form of the mother's faeces and provides the joey's digestive system with the micro-organisms necessary for digesting the eucalyptus leaves (4). Having first left the pouch during this time, the joey rides on its mother's belly, and later rides on her back. It normally remains with its mother until the following year's joey has emerged from the pouch (3).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Conservation

provided by Arkive
Although koalas are a protected species, their numbers have markedly decreased due to habitat loss, and many populations are now living in isolated patches of habitat, putting them at greater risk of localised extinctions. Remaining koala habitat is mostly on privately-owned land so landowners have a responsibility to conserve them. As an important step in its aim to achieve national species-specific legislation that would effectively protect koala habitat over all of the koala's range, in July 2004 the Australian Koala Foundation submitted a nomination to the Australian Government, supported by a large amount of scientific data, to list the koala as Vulnerable nationally as a matter of urgency. To date this has not been achieved. Without legislation that encourages landowners, through incentives, to protect habitat on their land, there are fears koala numbers will decline to such an extent that populations will be incapable of ever recovering (5). Legislation, along with continued research and monitoring, will be necessary to prevent this Australian icon from further declining as a result of competing land use pressures (5).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Description

provided by Arkive
Koalas are bear-like in appearance, with a stout body and large paws, but are in fact marsupials, not bears. Their fur is predominantly grey to light brown, being lighter and shorter in the warmer north of their range, where the koalas are also smaller (3). The chin, chest and insides of the ears and forelimbs are white, with white speckling on the rump and long white hairs edging the large, round ears. Koalas are adapted to life spent mainly in the trees, with a vestigial tail, and unusually long forelimbs in relation to their hind limbs, and specially adapted paws to aid in gripping and climbing. They have large claws and rough pads on their paws. The first and second digits of the front paws, as well as the first digits of the hind paws, are opposed to the others, like thumbs, to help to grip branches. The first digit of each hind paw has no claw, and the second and third digits are partially fused together to form a grooming claw for removing ticks (5). Males are larger and heavier than females, with a broader face. Mature males are distinguishable from females as they have a brown gland on their chests that produces scent used to mark trees within the territory. Being marsupials, the females have a pouch with a backwards-facing opening and a strong, contracting ring-shaped muscle at the pouch opening which prevents the young from falling out (5).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Habitat

provided by Arkive
Koalas live in eucalypt forests and woodlands, from cool-temperate to tropical areas (3).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Range

provided by Arkive
Populations exist in a band down the eastern and southern coasts and inland areas of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and South Australia, as well as on islands off Queensland, Victoria and South Australia (5).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Status

provided by Arkive
Classified as Lower Risk - near threatened (LR/nt) on the IUCN Red List 2003 (1). Listed as Vulnerable in the southeast Queensland bioregion under the Nature Conservation Act 1992 and as Common in the rest of the state. Classified as Vulnerable under the New South Wales Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. Victoria has no official listing and in South Australia, koalas are listed as Rare (5).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Threats

provided by Arkive
Koala numbers reached a low point in the 1930s, due mainly to the fur trade, when many local populations, including that in South Australia, became extinct, although they have since been re-introduced to South Australia. Other factors in their decline included land clearing, disease, fire and drought. Whilst the koala population as a whole has recovered somewhat since then, its current conservation status varies across its range (3). Major threats now include land clearing and urbanisation resulting in lost, fragmented and low quality habitats. Koalas are confined by their diet to a specialised habitat of which around 80% has been destroyed since Europeans settled in Australia. They are also threatened by fires, droughts, disease (particularly due to the Chlamydia bacterium), death by road traffic and predation by dog. Recently there has been a lot of attention in the media suggesting that koalas in some isolated patches of habitat have been the cause of defoliation of eucalyptus trees, resulting in calls for a cull of the koalas in these areas. That the koalas are to blame is a contentious issue amongst scientists and authorities and there is evidence to suggest that several other factors may be the cause (5).
license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Wildscreen
original
visit source
partner site
Arkive

Threats

provided by EOL staff

Climate change is predicted to cause an increase in drought frequency and fires in many parts of Australia as a result of reduced rainfall levels, increased evaporation rates, and an overall temperature increase of about 1ºC by 2030, according to a CSIRO report (IUCN 2009). Increasing frequency and intensity of droughts or periods of extreme heat would force Koalas to descend from trees more frequently in search of water or new habitats. This would make them more vulnerable to wild and domestic predators, as well as to road traffic. Dispersing Koalas often have to cross main roads and come into contact with domestic animals. It is estimated that around 4,000 Koalas are killed each year by dogs and cars alone (IUCN 2009).

Koalas’ warm fur and thick skin enables them to endure cold conditions in southern Australia, but they do not cope well with extreme heat. Unlike most arboreal marsupials, Koalas do not use nest hollows, which contributes to their greater susceptibility to extreme temperatures and drought. Bushfires, which have already wiped out numerous populations of Koalas, are likely to increase in both frequency and severity with climate change. Koalas are particularly vulnerable to bushfires as their slow movement and tree-dwelling lifestyle makes it difficult for them to escape and their food supply can be destroyed (IUCN 2009).

Climate change is likely to have some less obvious negative impacts on Koalas as well. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations globally have increased from 280 ppm to 387 ppm since the Industrial Revolution. Projections for 2050 suggest that carbon dioxide concentrations are likely to increase markedly to between 500 and 600 ppm, depending on future emissions scenarios (IUCN 2009). Increased carbon dioxide levels tend to result in faster plant growth, but also to reduce protein levels and increase tannin levels in plants’ leaves, making them less nutritious and more difficult to digest (Lawler et al. 1997). As carbon dioxide levels continue to rise, Koalas and other browsers will need to cope with increasingly nutrient-poor and tannin-rich leaves.

Given the altered chemical composition of their food plants, Koalas could meet their nutritional needs by spending more time feeding and thus eating more. However, there is a limit to how much Koalas can increase the size of their guts. Furthermore, eating more leaves causes food to pass more quickly through the Koala’s digestive system, resulting in less thorough digestion and decreased nutrient uptake. Another possibility would be to exercise greater selectivity in tree and leaf choice (see Moore and Foley 2000, 2005; DeGabriel et al. 2009). Although Koalas could be more selective in their food selection, however, this would require more travel time to find the best trees and Koalas travelling in search of food are at an increased risk of predation and road accidents. Furthermore, the nutritional demands of breeding female koalas are higher than those of non-breeding individuals, raising the possibility that even if nonbreeding individuals were able to sustain themselves when faced with less nutritious food options than they have today, failure of breeding females to meet their nutrition needs could nevertheless lead to widespread reproductive failure and population declines (IUCN 2009).

Reports of large population declines in the first years of this century have prompted reassessments of the Koala’s threat status by the Australian government (IUCN 2009). In addition to factors related to climate change, other major factors contributing to Koala declines include disease and habitat destruction. The primary disease threat is from chlamydia, a widespread sexually-transmitted disease that causes blindness, pneumonia, and urinary and reproductive tract infections and death in Koalas. Habitat loss is also a major problem. Destruction and degradation of Koala habitat is particularly prevalent in the coastal regions of Australia, where urban development is rapidly encroaching on eucalyptus forests. In addition, habitat fragmentation limits Koalas’ ability to disperse to suitable areas and can intensify inbreeding problems (IUCN 2009).

license
cc-by-nc-sa-3.0
copyright
Shapiro, Leo
author
Shapiro, Leo
original
visit source
partner site
EOL staff

Koala

provided by wikipedia EN

The koala or, inaccurately, koala bear (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland's eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Fur colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possibly are separate subspecies, but this is disputed.

Koalas typically inhabit open Eucalyptus woodland, the leaves of these trees make up most of their diet. Because this eucalypt diet has limited nutritional and caloric content, koalas are largely sedentary and sleep up to 20 hours a day. They are asocial animals, and bonding exists only between mothers and dependent offspring. Adult males communicate with loud bellows that intimidate rivals and attract mates. Males mark their presence with secretions from scent glands located on their chests. Being marsupials, koalas give birth to underdeveloped young that crawl into their mothers' pouches, where they stay for the first six to seven months of their lives. These young koalas, known as joeys, are fully weaned around a year old. Koalas have few natural predators and parasites, but are threatened by various pathogens, such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria and the koala retrovirus.

Because of its distinctive appearance, the koala is recognised worldwide as a symbol of Australia. They were hunted by Indigenous Australians and depicted in myths and cave art for millennia. The first recorded encounter between a European and a koala was in 1798, and an image of the animal was published in 1810 by naturalist George Perry. Botanist Robert Brown wrote the first detailed scientific description of the koala in 1814, although his work remained unpublished for 180 years. Popular artist John Gould illustrated and described the koala, introducing the species to the general British public. Further details about the animal's biology were revealed in the 19th century by several English scientists. Koalas are listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Among the many threats to their existence are habitat destruction caused by agriculture, urbanisation, droughts and associated bushfires, some related to climate change. In February of 2022, the koala was officially listed as endangered in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Queensland.

Etymology

The word koala comes from the Dharug gula, meaning no water. Although the vowel 'u' was originally written in the English orthography as "oo" (in spellings such as coola or koolah — two syllables), later became "oa" and is now pronounced in three syllables, possibly in error.[4]

Adopted by white settlers, "koala" became one of several hundred Aboriginal loan words in Australian English, where it was also commonly referred to as "native bear",[5] later "koala bear", for its supposed resemblance to a bear.[6] It is also one of several Aboriginal words that made it into International English, alongside e.g. "didgeridoo" and "kangaroo."[6] The generic name, Phascolarctos, is derived from the Greek words phaskolos "pouch" and arktos "bear". The specific name, cinereus, is Latin for "ash coloured".[7]

Taxonomy and evolution

       

Peramelidae

   

Dasyuridae

   

Dromiciops

    Diprotodontia   "possums"  

Petauroidea

   

Phalangeroidea

       

Hypsiprymnodon moschatus

     

Potoroinae

   

Macropodinae

        Vombatiformes

Phascolarctos cinereus

     

Thylacoleo carnifex

     

Ngapakaldia

      Diprotodontidae

Diprotodon optatum

     

Zygomaturus trilobus

   

Nimbadon lavarackorum

       

Muramura williamsi

     

Ilaria illumidens

   

Vombatidae

                    Phylogeny of Diprotodontia, (with outgroup)[8]

The koala was given its generic name Phascolarctos in 1816 by French zoologist Henri Marie Ducrotay de Blainville,[9] who would not give it a specific name until further review. In 1819, German zoologist Georg August Goldfuss gave it the binomial Lipurus cinereus. Because Phascolarctos was published first, according to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, it has priority as the official name of the genus.[10]: 58–59  French naturalist Anselme Gaëtan Desmarest proposed the name Phascolarctos fuscus in 1820, suggesting that the brown-coloured versions were a different species than the grey ones. Other names suggested by European authors included Marodactylus cinereus by Goldfuss in 1820, P. flindersii by René Primevère Lesson in 1827, and P. koala by John Edward Gray in 1827.[2]: 45 

The koala is classified with wombats (family Vombatidae) and several extinct families (including marsupial tapirs, marsupial lions and giant wombats) in the suborder Vombatiformes within the order Diprotodontia.[11] The Vombatiformes are a sister group to a clade that includes macropods (kangaroos and wallabies) and possums.[12] The ancestors of vombatiforms were likely arboreal,[8] and the koala's lineage was possibly the first to branch off around 40 million years ago during the Eocene.[13]

 src=
Reconstructions of the ancient koalas Nimiokoala (larger), and Litokoala (smaller), from the Miocene Riversleigh Fauna

The modern koala is the only extant member of Phascolarctidae, a family that once included several genera and species. During the Oligocene and Miocene, koalas lived in rainforests and had less specialised diets.[14] Some species, such as the Riversleigh rainforest koala (Nimiokoala greystanesi) and some species of Perikoala, were around the same size as the modern koala, while others, such as species of Litokoala, were one-half to two-thirds its size.[15] Like the modern species, prehistoric koalas had well developed ear structures which suggests that long-distance vocalising and sedentism developed early.[14] During the Miocene, the Australian continent began drying out, leading to the decline of rainforests and the spread of open Eucalyptus woodlands. The genus Phascolarctos split from Litokoala in the late Miocene[14][16] and had several adaptations that allowed it to live on a specialised eucalyptus diet: a shifting of the palate towards the front of the skull; larger molars and premolars; smaller pterygoid fossa;[14] and a larger gap between the molar and the incisor teeth.[17]: 226 

P. cinereus may have emerged as a dwarf form of the giant koala (P. stirtoni). The reduction in the size of large mammals has been seen as a common phenomenon worldwide during the late Pleistocene, and several Australian mammals, such as the agile wallaby, are traditionally believed to have resulted from this dwarfing. A 2008 study questions this hypothesis, noting that P. cinereus and P. stirtoni were sympatric during the middle to late Pleistocene, and possibly as early as the Pliocene.[18] The fossil record of the modern koala extends back at least to the middle Pleistocene.[19]

Genetics and variations

Three subspecies are recognised: the Queensland koala (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus, Thomas 1923), the New South Wales koala (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus, Goldfuss 1817), and the Victorian koala (Phascolarctos cinereus victor, Troughton 1935). These forms are distinguished by pelage colour and thickness, body size, and skull shape. The Queensland koala is the smallest of the three, with shorter, silver fur and a shorter skull. The Victorian koala is the largest, with shaggier, brown fur and a wider skull.[20]: 7 [21] The boundaries of these variations are based on state borders, and their status as subspecies is disputed. A 1999 genetic study suggests that the variations represent differentiated populations with limited gene flow between them, and that the three subspecies comprise a single evolutionarily significant unit.[21] Other studies have found that koala populations have high levels of inbreeding and low genetic variation.[22][23] Such low genetic diversity may have been a characteristic of koala populations since the late Pleistocene.[24] Rivers and roads have been shown to limit gene flow and contribute to the genetic differentiation of southeast Queensland populations.[25] In April 2013, scientists from the Australian Museum and Queensland University of Technology announced they had fully sequenced the koala genome.[26]

Characteristics and adaptations

Scratching and grooming

The koala is a stocky animal with a large head and vestigial or non-existent tail.[10]: 1 [27] It has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and a weight of 4–15 kg (9–33 lb),[27] making it among the largest arboreal marsupials.[28] Koalas from Victoria are twice as heavy as those from Queensland.[20]: 7  The species is sexually dimorphic, with males 50% larger than females. Males are further distinguished from females by their more curved noses[28] and the presence of chest glands, which are visible as hairless patches.[20]: 55  As in most marsupials, the male koala has a bifurcated penis,[29] and the female has two lateral vaginas and two separate uteri.[10]: 3  The male's penile sheath contains naturally occurring bacteria that play an important role in fertilisation.[30] The female's pouch opening is tightened by a sphincter that keeps the young from falling out.[31]

The pelage of the koala is thicker and longer on the back, and shorter on the belly. The ears have thick fur on both the inside and outside.[28] The back fur colour varies from light grey to chocolate brown.[10]: 1–2  The belly fur is whitish; on the rump it is dappled whitish, and darker at the back.[27] The koala has the most effective insulating back fur of any marsupial and is highly resilient to wind and rain, while the belly fur can reflect solar radiation.[32] The koala's curved, sharp claws are well adapted for climbing trees. The large forepaws have two opposable digits (the first and second, which are opposable to the other three) that allow them to grasp small branches. On the hindpaws, the second and third digits are fused, a typical condition for members of the Diprotodontia, and the attached claws (which are still separate) are used for grooming.[20]: 5  As in humans and other primates, koalas have friction ridges on their paws.[33] The animal has a sturdy skeleton and a short, muscular upper body with proportionately long upper limbs that contribute to its climbing and grasping abilities. Additional climbing strength is achieved with thigh muscles that attach to the shinbone lower than other animals.[2]: 183  The koala has a cartilaginous pad at the end of the spine that may make it more comfortable when it perches in the fork of a tree.[31]

 src=
Mounted skeleton

The koala has one of the smallest brains in proportion to body weight of any mammal,[10]: 81  being 60% smaller than that of a typical diprotodont, weighing only 19.2 g (0.68 oz) on average.[34] The brain's surface is fairly smooth, typical for a "primitive" animal.[20]: 52  It occupies only 61% of the cranial cavity[10]: 81  and is pressed against the inside surface by cerebrospinal fluid. The function of this relatively large amount of fluid is not known, although one possibility is that it acts as a shock absorber, cushioning the brain if the animal falls from a tree.[20]: 52  The koala's small brain size may be an adaptation to the energy restrictions imposed by its diet, which is insufficient to sustain a larger brain.[10]: 81  Because of its small brain, the koala has a limited ability to perform complex, unfamiliar behaviours. For example, when presented with plucked leaves on a flat surface, the animal cannot adapt to the change in its normal feeding routine and will not eat the leaves.[17]: 234  The koala's olfactory senses are normal, and it is known to sniff the oils of individual branchlets to assess their edibility.[10]: 81  Its nose is fairly large and covered in leathery skin. Its round ears provide it with good hearing,[31] and it has a well-developed middle ear.[14] A koala's vision is not well developed,[31] and its relatively small eyes are unusual among marsupials in that the pupils have vertical slits.[28] Koalas make use of a novel vocal organ to produce low-pitched sounds (see social spacing, below). Unlike typical mammalian vocal cords, which are folds in the larynx, these organs are placed in the velum (soft palate) and are called velar vocal cords.[35][36]

 src=
Teeth of a koala, from left to right: molars, premolars (dark), diastema, canines, incisors

The koala has several adaptations for its eucalypt diet, which is of low nutritive value, of high toxicity, and high in dietary fibre.[10]: 76  The animal's dentition consists of the incisors and cheek teeth (a single premolar and four molars on each jaw), which are separated by a large gap (a characteristic feature of herbivorous mammals). The incisors are used for grasping leaves, which are then passed to the premolars to be snipped at the petiole before being passed to the highly cusped molars, where they are shredded into small pieces.[20]: 46  Koalas may also store food in their cheek pouches before it is ready to be chewed.[37] The partially worn molars of middle-aged koalas are optimal for breaking the leaves into small particles, resulting in more efficient stomach digestion and nutrient absorption in the small intestine,[17]: 231  which digests the eucalyptus leaves to provide most of the animal's energy.[20]: 47  A koala sometimes regurgitates the food into the mouth to be chewed a second time.[38]

Unlike kangaroos and eucalyptus-eating possums, koalas are hindgut fermenters, and their digestive retention can last for up to 100 hours in the wild, or up to 200 hours in captivity.[20]: 48  This is made possible by the extraordinary length of their caecum—200 cm (80 in) long and 10 cm (4 in) in diameter—the largest proportionally of any animal.[2]: 188  Koalas can select which food particles to retain for longer fermentation and which to pass through. Large particles typically pass through more quickly, as they would take more time to digest.[20]: 48  While the hindgut is proportionally larger in the koala than in other herbivores, only 10% of the animal's energy is obtained from fermentation. Since the koala gains a low amount of energy from its diet, its metabolic rate is half that of a typical mammal,[10]: 76  although this can vary between seasons and sexes.[20]: 49  They are able to digest the toxins present in eucalyptus leaves due to their production of cytochrome P450, which breaks down these poisons in the liver.[39] The koala conserves water by passing relatively dry faecal pellets high in undigested fibre, and by storing water in the caecum.[17]: 231 

Distribution and habitat

The koala's geographic range covers roughly 1,000,000 km2 (390,000 sq mi), and 30 ecoregions.[40] It extends throughout eastern and southeastern Australia, encompassing northeastern, central and southeastern Queensland, eastern New South Wales, Victoria, and southeastern South Australia. The koala was reintroduced near Adelaide and on several islands, including Kangaroo Island and French Island.[1] The population on Magnetic Island represents the northern limit of its range.[40] Fossil evidence shows that the koala's range stretched as far west as southwestern Western Australia during the late Pleistocene.[20] Koalas were introduced to Western Australia at Yanchep.[41] They were likely driven to extinction in these areas by environmental changes and hunting by Indigenous Australians.[20]: 12–13  In South Australia, koalas were only known to exist in recent times in the lower South East,[20]: 32  with a remnant population in the Bangham Forest between Bordertown and Naracoorte,[42] until introduced to the Mount Lofty Ranges in the 20th-century. Doubts have been cast on Eyre's identification as koala pelt a girdle being worn by an Aboriginal man, the only evidence of their existence elsewhere in the State.[43] Koalas can be found in habitats ranging from relatively open forests to woodlands, and in climates ranging from tropical to cool temperate.[28] In semi-arid climates, they prefer riparian habitats, where nearby streams and creeks provide refuge during times of drought and extreme heat.[44]

Ecology and behaviour

Foraging and activities

 src=
Foraging

Koalas are herbivorous, and while most of their diet consists of eucalypt leaves, they can be found in trees of other genera, such as Acacia, Allocasuarina, Callitris, Leptospermum, and Melaleuca.[10]: 73  Though the foliage of over 600 species of Eucalyptus is available, the koala shows a strong preference for around 30.[45] They tend to choose species that have a high protein content and low proportions of fibre and lignin.[17]: 231  The most favoured species are Eucalyptus microcorys, E. tereticornis, and E. camaldulensis, which, on average, make up more than 20% of their diet.[46] They will also consume other species in the genus such as E. ovata, E. punctata, and E. viminalis.[47] Despite its reputation as a fussy eater, the koala is more generalist than some other marsupial species, such as the greater glider. Since eucalypt leaves have a high water content, the koala does not need to drink often;[10]: 74  its daily water turnover rate ranges from 71 to 91 ml/kg of body weight. Although females can meet their water requirements from eating leaves, larger males require additional water found on the ground or in tree hollows.[17]: 231  When feeding, a koala holds onto a branch with hindpaws and one forepaw while the other forepaw grasps foliage. Small koalas can move close to the end of a branch, but larger ones stay near the thicker bases.[10]: 96  Koalas consume up to 400 grams (14 oz) of leaves a day, spread over four to six feeding sessions.[2]: 187  Despite their adaptations to a low-energy lifestyle, they have meagre fat reserves and need to feed often.[2]: 189 

Because they get so little energy from their diet, koalas must limit their energy use and sleep or rest 20 hours a day.[10]: 93 [48] They are predominantly active at night and spend most of their waking hours feeding. They typically eat and sleep in the same tree, possibly for as long as a day.[20]: 39  On very hot days, a koala may climb down to the coolest part of the tree which is cooler than the surrounding air. The koala hugs the tree to lose heat without panting.[49][50] On warm days, a koala may rest with its back against a branch or lie on its stomach or back with its limbs dangling.[10]: 93–94  During cold, wet periods, it curls itself into a tight ball to conserve energy.[20]: 39  On windy days, a koala finds a lower, thicker branch on which to rest. While it spends most of the time in the tree, the animal descends to the ground to move to another tree.[10]: 94  The koala usually grooms itself with its hindpaws, but sometimes uses its forepaws or mouth.[10]: 97–98 

Social spacing

Koala resting in tree between branch and stem
Resting
A bellowing male in the Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Koalas are asocial animals and spend just 15 minutes a day on social behaviours. In Victoria, home ranges are small and have extensive overlap, while in central Queensland they are larger and overlap less.[10]: 98  Koala society appears to consist of "residents" and "transients", the former being mostly adult females and the latter males. Resident males appear to be territorial and dominate others with their larger body size.[51] Alpha males tend to establish their territories close to breeding females, while younger males are subordinate until they mature and reach full size.[2]: 191  Adult males occasionally venture outside their home ranges; when they do so, dominant ones retain their status.[10]: 99  When a male enters a new tree, he marks it by rubbing his chest gland against the trunk or a branch; males have occasionally been observed to dribble urine on the trunk. This scent-marking behaviour probably serves as communication, and individuals are known to sniff the base of a tree before climbing.[20]: 54–56  Scent marking is common during aggressive encounters.[52] Chest gland secretions are complex chemical mixtures—about 40 compounds were identified in one analysis—that vary in composition and concentration with the season and the age of the individual.[53]

 src=
Scent gland on the chest of an adult male. Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary

Adult males communicate with loud bellows—low pitched sounds that consist of snore-like inhalations and resonant exhalations that sound like growls.[54] These sounds are thought to be generated by unique vocal organs found in koalas.[35] Because of their low frequency, these bellows can travel far through air and vegetation.[20]: 56  Koalas may bellow at any time of the year, particularly during the breeding season, when it serves to attract females and possibly intimidate other males.[55] They also bellow to advertise their presence to their neighbours when they enter a new tree.[20]: 57  These sounds signal the male's actual body size, as well as exaggerate it;[56] females pay more attention to bellows that originate from larger males.[57] Female koalas bellow, though more softly, in addition to making snarls, wails, and screams. These calls are produced when in distress and when making defensive threats.[54] Young koalas squeak when in distress. As they get older, the squeak develops into a "squawk" produced both when in distress and to show aggression. When another individual climbs over it, a koala makes a low grunt with its mouth closed. Koalas make numerous facial expressions. When snarling, wailing, or squawking, the animal curls the upper lip and points its ears forward. During screams, the lips retract and the ears are drawn back. Females bring their lips forward and raise their ears when agitated.[10]: 102–05 

Agonistic behaviour typically consists of squabbles between individuals climbing over or passing each other. This occasionally involves biting. Males that are strangers may wrestle, chase, and bite each other.[10]: 102 [58] In extreme situations, a male may try to displace a smaller rival from a tree. This involves the larger aggressor climbing up and attempting to corner the victim, which tries either to rush past him and climb down or to move to the end of a branch. The aggressor attacks by grasping the target by the shoulders and repeatedly biting him. Once the weaker individual is driven away, the victor bellows and marks the tree.[10]: 101–02  Pregnant and lactating females are particularly aggressive and attack individuals that come too close.[58] In general, however, koalas tend to avoid energy-wasting aggressive behaviour.[2]: 191 

Reproduction and development

 src=
A young joey, preserved at Port Macquarie Koala Hospital

Koalas are seasonal breeders, and births take place from the middle of spring through the summer to early autumn, from October to May. Females in oestrus tend to hold their heads further back than usual and commonly display tremors and spasms. However, males do not appear to recognise these signs, and have been observed to mount non-oestrous females. Because of his much larger size, a male can usually force himself on a female, mounting her from behind, and in extreme cases, the male may pull the female out of the tree. A female may scream and vigorously fight off her suitors, but will submit to one that is dominant or is more familiar. The bellows and screams that accompany matings can attract other males to the scene, obliging the incumbent to delay mating and fight off the intruders. These fights may allow the female to assess which is dominant.[20]: 58–60  Older males usually have accumulated scratches, scars, and cuts on the exposed parts of their noses and on their eyelids.[2]: 192 

The koala's gestation period lasts 33–35 days,[59] and a female gives birth to a single joey (although twins occur on occasion). As with all marsupials, the young are born while at the embryonic stage, weighing only 0.5 g (0.02 oz). However, they have relatively well-developed lips, forelimbs, and shoulders, as well as functioning respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems. The joey crawls into its mother's pouch to continue the rest of its development.[20]: 61  Unlike most other marsupials, the koala does not clean her pouch.[2]: 181 

A female koala has two teats; the joey attaches itself to one of them and suckles for the rest of its pouch life.[20]: 61  The koala has one of the lowest milk energy production rates in relation to body size of any mammal. The female makes up for this by lactating for as long as 12 months.[20]: 62  At seven weeks of age, the joey's head grows longer and becomes proportionally large, pigmentation begins to develop, and its sex can be determined (the scrotum appears in males and the pouch begins to develop in females). At 13 weeks, the joey weighs around 50 g (1.8 oz) and its head has doubled in size. The eyes begin to open and fine fur grows on the forehead, nape, shoulders, and arms. At 26 weeks, the fully furred animal resembles an adult, and begins to poke its head out of the pouch.[20]: 63 

 src=
Mother with joey on back

As the young koala approaches six months, the mother begins to prepare it for its eucalyptus diet by predigesting the leaves, producing a faecal pap that the joey eats from her cloaca. The pap is quite different in composition from regular faeces, resembling instead the contents of the caecum, which has a high concentration of bacteria. Eaten for about a month, the pap provides a supplementary source of protein at a transition time from a milk to a leaf diet.[17]: 235  The joey fully emerges from the pouch for the first time at six or seven months of age, when it weighs 300–500 g (11–18 oz). It explores its new surroundings cautiously, clinging to its mother for support. By nine months, it weighs over 1 kg (2.2 lb) and develops its adult fur colour. Having permanently left the pouch, it rides on its mother's back for transportation, learning to climb by grasping branches.[20]: 65–66  Gradually, it spends more time away from its mother, who becomes pregnant again after 12 month when the young is now around.2.5 kg (5.5 lb). Her bond with her previous offspring is permanently severed and she no longer allows it to suckle. Young will continue to live near their mother for the next 6–12 months.[20]: 66–67 

Females become sexually mature at about three years of age and can then become pregnant; in comparison, males reach sexual maturity when they are about four years old,[60] although they can produce sperm as early as two years.[20]: 68  While the chest glands can be functional as early as 18 months of age, males do not begin scent-marking behaviours until they reach sexual maturity.[53] Because the offspring have a long dependent period, female koalas usually breed in alternate years. Favourable environmental factors, such as a plentiful supply of high-quality food trees, allow them to reproduce every year.[17]: 236 

Health and mortality

Koalas may live from 13 to 18 years in the wild. While female koalas usually live this long, males may die sooner because of their more hazardous lives.[20]: 69  Koalas usually survive falls from trees and immediately climb back up, but injuries and deaths from falls do occur, particularly in inexperienced young and fighting males.[20]: 72–73  Around six years of age, the koala's chewing teeth begin to wear down and their chewing efficiency decreases. Eventually, the cusps disappear completely and the animal will die of starvation.[61] Koalas have few predators; dingos and large pythons may prey on them; birds of prey (such as powerful owls and wedge-tailed eagles) are threats to young. Koalas are generally not subject to external parasites, other than ticks in coastal areas. Koalas may also suffer mange from the mite Sarcoptes scabiei, and skin ulcers from the bacterium Mycobacterium ulcerans, but neither is common. Internal parasites are few and largely harmless.[20]: 71–73  These include the tapeworm Bertiella obesa, commonly found in the intestine, and the nematodes Marsupostrongylus longilarvatus and Durikainema phascolarcti, which are infrequently found in the lungs.[62] In a three-year study of almost 600 koalas admitted to the Australian Zoo Wildlife Hospital in Queensland, 73.8% of the animals were infected with at least one species of the parasitic protozoal genus Trypanosoma, the most common of which was T. irwini.[63]

Koalas can be subject to pathogens such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria,[20]: 74–75  which can cause keratoconjunctivitis, urinary tract infection, and reproductive tract infection.[10]: 229–30  Such infections are widespread on the mainland, but absent in some island populations.[20]: 114  The koala retrovirus (KoRV) may cause koala immune deficiency syndrome (KIDS) which is similar to AIDS in humans. Prevalence of KoRV in koala populations suggests a trend spreading from the north to the south of Australia. Northern populations are completely infected, while some southern populations (including Kangaroo Island) are free.[64]

The animals are vulnerable to bushfires due to their slow movements and the flammability of eucalypt trees.[20]: 26  The koala instinctively seeks refuge in the higher branches, where it is vulnerable to intense heat and flames. Bushfires also fragment the animal's habitat, which restricts their movement and leads to population decline and loss of genetic diversity.[2]: 209–11  Dehydration and overheating can also prove fatal.[10]: 80  Consequently, the koala is vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Models of climate change in Australia predict warmer and drier climates, suggesting that the koala's range will shrink in the east and south to more mesic habitats.[65]

Human relations

History

 src=
George Perry's illustration in his 1810 Arcana was the first published image of the koala.

The first written reference of the koala was recorded by John Price, servant of John Hunter, the Governor of New South Wales. Price encountered the "cullawine" on 26 January 1798, during an expedition to the Blue Mountains,[66] although his account was not published until nearly a century later in Historical Records of Australia.[2]: 8  In 1802, French-born explorer Francis Louis Barrallier encountered the animal when his two Aboriginal guides, returning from a hunt, brought back two koala feet they were intending to eat. Barrallier preserved the appendages and sent them and his notes to Hunter's successor, Philip Gidley King, who forwarded them to Joseph Banks. Similar to Price, Barrallier's notes were not published until 1897.[2]: 9–10  Reports of the first capture of a live "koolah" appeared in The Sydney Gazette in August 1803.[67] Within a few weeks Flinders' astronomer, James Inman, purchased a specimen pair for live shipment to Joseph Banks in England. They were described as 'somewhat larger than the Waumbut (Wombat)'. These encounters helped provide the impetus for King to commission the artist John Lewin to paint watercolours of the animal. Lewin painted three pictures, one of which was subsequently made into a print that was reproduced in Georges Cuvier's Le Règne Animal (The Animal Kingdom) (first published in 1817) and several European works on natural history.[2]: 12–13, 45 

Botanist Robert Brown was the first to write a detailed scientific description of the koala in 1803, based on a female specimen captured near what is now Mount Kembla in the Illawarra region of New South Wales. Austrian botanical illustrator Ferdinand Bauer drew the animal's skull, throat, feet, and paws. Brown's work remained unpublished and largely unnoticed, however, as his field books and notes remained in his possession until his death, when they were bequeathed to the British Museum (Natural History) in London. They were not identified until 1994, while Bauer's koala watercolours were not published until 1989.[2]: 16–28  British surgeon Everard Home included details of the koala based on eyewitness accounts of William Paterson, who had befriended Brown and Bauer during their stay in New South Wales.[2]: 33–36  Home, who in 1808 published his report in the journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society,[68] gave the animal the scientific name Didelphis coola.[2]: 36 

The first published image of the koala appeared in George Perry's (1810) natural history work Arcana.[2]: 37  Perry called it the "New Holland Sloth" on account of its perceived similarities to the Central and South American tree-living mammals of genus Bradypus. His disdain for the koala, evident in his description of the animal, was typical of the prevailing early 19th-century British attitude about the primitiveness and oddity of Australian fauna:[2]: 40 

... the eye is placed like that of the Sloth, very close to the mouth and nose, which gives it a clumsy awkward appearance, and void of elegance in the combination ... they have little either in their character or appearance to interest the Naturalist or Philosopher. As Nature however provides nothing in vain, we may suppose that even these torpid, senseless creatures are wisely intended to fill up one of the great links of the chain of animated nature ...[69]

 src=
Natural history illustrator John Gould popularised the koala with his 1863 work The Mammals of Australia.

Naturalist and popular artist John Gould illustrated and described the koala in his three-volume work The Mammals of Australia (1845–1863) and introduced the species, as well as other members of Australia's little-known faunal community, to the general British public.[2]: 87–93  Comparative anatomist Richard Owen, in a series of publications on the physiology and anatomy of Australian mammals, presented a paper on the anatomy of the koala to the Zoological Society of London.[70] In this widely cited publication, he provided the first careful description of its internal anatomy, and noted its general structural similarity to the wombat.[2]: 94–96  English naturalist George Robert Waterhouse, curator of the Zoological Society of London, was the first to correctly classify the koala as a marsupial in the 1840s. He identified similarities between it and its fossil relatives Diprotodon and Nototherium, which had been discovered just a few years before.[2]: 46–48  Similarly, Gerard Krefft, curator of the Australian Museum in Sydney, noted evolutionary mechanisms at work when comparing the koala to its ancestral relatives in his 1871 The Mammals of Australia.[2]: 103–105 

The first living koala in Britain arrived in 1881, purchased by the Zoological Society of London. As related by prosecutor to the society, William Alexander Forbes, the animal suffered an accidental demise when the heavy lid of a washstand fell on it and it was unable to free itself. Forbes used the opportunity to dissect the fresh female specimen, thus was able to provide explicit anatomical details on the female reproductive system, the brain, and the liver—parts not previously described by Owen, who had access only to preserved specimens.[2]: 105–06  Scottish embryologist William Caldwell—well known in scientific circles for determining the reproductive mechanism of the platypus—described the uterine development of the koala in 1884,[71] and used the new information to convincingly place the koala and the monotremes into an evolutionary time frame.[2]: 111 

Cultural significance

Koala souvenir soft toys
Koala souvenir soft toys are popular with tourists
Amy and Oliver the bronze koalas (by artist Glenys Lindsay)
Amy and Oliver the bronze koalas (by Glenys Lindsay)

The koala is well known worldwide and is a major draw for Australian zoos and wildlife parks. It has been featured in advertisements, games, cartoons, and as soft toys.[10]: ix  It benefited the national tourism industry by over an estimated billion Australian dollars in 1998, a figure that has since grown.[2]: 201  In 1997, half of visitors to Australia, especially those from Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, sought out zoos and wildlife parks; about 75% of European and Japanese tourists placed the koala at the top of their list of animals to see.[2]: 216  According to biologist Stephen Jackson: "If you were to take a straw poll of the animal most closely associated with Australia, it's a fair bet that the koala would come out marginally in front of the kangaroo".[10]: ix  Factors that contribute to the koala's enduring popularity include its childlike body proportions and teddy bear-like face.[20]: 3 

The koala is featured in the Dreamtime stories and mythology of Indigenous Australians. The Tharawal people believed that the animal helped row the boat that brought them to the continent.[10]: 21  Another myth tells of how a tribe killed a koala and used its long intestines to create a bridge for people from other parts of the world. This narrative highlights the koala's status as a game animal and the length of its intestines.[20]: 17  Several stories tell of how the koala lost its tail. In one, a kangaroo cuts it off to punish the koala for being lazy and greedy.[10]: 28  Tribes in both Queensland and Victoria regarded the koala as a wise animal and sought its advice. Bidjara-speaking people credited the koala for turning barren lands into lush forests.[10]: 41–43  The animal is also depicted in rock carvings, though not as much as some other species.[10]: 45–46 

Early European settlers in Australia considered the koala to be a prowling sloth-like animal with a "fierce and menacing look".[10]: 143  At the beginning of the 20th century, the koala's reputation took a more positive turn, largely due to its growing popularity and depiction in several widely circulated children's stories.[2]: 162  It is featured in Ethel Pedley's 1899 book Dot and the Kangaroo, in which it is portrayed as the "funny native bear".[10]: 144  Artist Norman Lindsay depicted a more anthropomorphic koala in The Bulletin cartoons, starting in 1904. This character also appeared as Bunyip Bluegum in Lindsay's 1918 book The Magic Pudding.[10]: 147  Perhaps the most famous fictional koala is Blinky Bill. Created by Dorothy Wall in 1933, the character appeared in several books and has been the subject of films, TV series, merchandise, and a 1986 environmental song by John Williamson.[10]: 149–52  The first Australian stamp featuring a koala was issued by the Commonwealth in 1930.[2]: 164  A television ad campaign for Australia's national airline Qantas, starting in 1967 and running for several decades, featured a live koala (voiced by Howard Morris), who complained that too many tourists were coming to Australia and concluded "I hate Qantas".[72] The series has been ranked among the greatest commercials of all time.[73]

The song "Ode to a Koala Bear" appears on the B-side of the 1983 Paul McCartney/Michael Jackson duet single Say Say Say.[10]: 151  A koala is the main character in Hanna-Barbera's The Kwicky Koala Show and Nippon Animation's Noozles, both of which were animated cartoons of the early 1980s. Food products shaped like the koala include the Caramello Koala chocolate bar and the bite-sized cookie snack Koala's March. Dadswells Bridge in Victoria features a tourist complex shaped like a giant koala[10]: 155–58  and the Queensland Reds rugby team has a koala as its mascot.[10]: 160  The Platinum Koala and Australian Silver Koala coins feature the animal on the reverse and Elizabeth II on the obverse.[74]

 src=
US President Barack Obama with a koala in Brisbane, Australia

The drop bear is an imaginary creature in contemporary Australian folklore featuring a predatory, carnivorous version of the koala. This hoax animal is commonly spoken about in tall tales designed to scare tourists. While koalas are typically docile herbivores, drop bears are described as unusually large and vicious marsupials that inhabit treetops and attack unsuspecting people (or other prey) that walk beneath them by dropping onto their heads from above.[75][76]

Koala diplomacy

Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, visited the Koala Park Sanctuary in Sydney in 1934[77] and was "intensely interested in the bears". His photograph, with Noel Burnet, the founder of the park, and a koala, appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald. After World War II, when tourism to Australia increased and the animals were exported to zoos overseas, the koala's international popularity rose. Several political leaders and members of royal families had their pictures taken with koalas, including Queen Elizabeth II, Prince Harry, Crown Prince Naruhito, Crown Princess Masako, Pope John Paul II, US President Bill Clinton, Soviet premier Mikhail Gorbachev and South African President Nelson Mandela[10]: 156 

At the 2014 G20 Brisbane summit, hosted by Prime Minister Tony Abbott, many world leaders including Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Barack Obama were photographed holding koalas.[78][79] The event gave rise to the term "koala diplomacy",[80][81] which then became the Oxford Word of the Month for December 2016.[82] The term also includes the loan of koalas by the Australian government to overseas zoos in countries such as Singapore and Japan, as a form of "soft power diplomacy", in a manner similar to the "panda diplomacy" practised by China.[83][84]

Conservation issues

 src=
Road sign depicting a koala and a kangaroo

The koala was originally classified as Least Concern on the Red List, and reassessed as Vulnerable in 2014.[1] In the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Queensland, the species was listed under the EPBC Act in February 2022 as endangered by extinction.[85][86] The described population was determined in 2012 to be "a species for the purposes of the EPBC Act 1999" in Federal legislation.[87]

Australian policymakers had declined a 2009 proposal to include the koala in the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.[19] In 2012, the Australian government listed koala populations in Queensland and New South Wales as Vulnerable, because of a 40% population decline in the former and a 33% decline in the latter. A 2017 WWF report found a 53% decline per generation in Queensland, and a 26% decline in New South Wales.[88] The koala population in South Australia and Victoria and appear to be abundant; however, the Australian Koala Foundation (AKF) argued that the exclusion of Victorian populations from protective measures was based on a misconception that the total koala population was 200,000, whereas they believed in 2012 that it was probably less than 100,000.[89] AKF estimated in 2022 that there could be as few as 43,000 individuals.[90] This is compared with 8 to 10 million at the start of the 20th century.[91][92]

The koala was heavily hunted by European settlers in the early 20th century,[2]: 121–128  largely for its thick, soft fur. More than two million pelts are estimated to have left Australia by 1924. Pelts were in demand for use in rugs, coat linings, muffs, and as trimming on women's garments.[2]: 125  The first successful efforts at conserving the species were initiated by the establishment of Brisbane's Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary and Sydney's Koala Park Sanctuary in the 1920s and 1930s. The owner of the latter park, Noel Burnet, became the first to successfully breed koalas and earned a reputation as the foremost contemporary authority on the marsupial.[2]: 157–159 

One of the biggest anthropogenic threats to the koala is habitat destruction and fragmentation. In coastal areas, the main cause of this is urbanisation, while in rural areas, habitat is cleared for agriculture. Native forest trees are also taken down to be made into wood products.[20]: 104–107  In 2000, Australia ranked fifth in the world by deforestation rates, having cleared 564,800 hectares (1,396,000 acres).[10]: 222  The distribution of the koala has shrunk by more than 50% since European arrival, largely due to fragmentation of habitat in Queensland.[40] Nevertheless, koalas live in many protected areas.[1]

While urbanisation can pose a threat to koala populations, the animals can survive in urban areas provided enough trees are present.[93] Urban populations have distinct vulnerabilities: collisions with vehicles and attacks by domestic dogs.[94] To reduce road deaths, government agencies have been exploring various wildlife crossing options,[95][96] such as the use of fencing to channel animals toward an underpass, in some cases adding a ledge as walkway to an existing culvert.[97][98] Dogs kill about 4,000 animals every year.[99] Injured koalas are often taken to wildlife hospitals and rehabilitation centres.[93] In a 30-year retrospective study performed at a New South Wales koala rehabilitation centre, trauma (usually resulting from a motor vehicle accident or dog attack) was found to be the most frequent cause of admission, followed by symptoms of Chlamydia infection.[100]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Woinarski, J.; Burbidge, A.A. (2020). "Phascolarctos cinereus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2020: e.T16892A166496779. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2020-1.RLTS.T16892A166496779.en. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af Moyal, Ann (2008). Koala: a historical biography. Melbourne: CSIRO Pub. ISBN 978-0-643-09401-7. OCLC 476194354. Archived from the original on 2 May 2016. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  3. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). "Order Diprotodontia". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 43. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
  4. ^ Dixon, R. M. W.; Moore, B.; Ramson, W. S.; Thomas, M. (2006). Australian Aboriginal Words in English: Their Origin and Meaning (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-19-554073-4.
  5. ^ Edward E. Morris (1898). Dictionary of Australian Words (orig) Austral English. This author strongly deprecated use of another synonym, "sloth".
  6. ^ a b Leitner, Gerhard; Sieloff, Inke (1998). "Aboriginal words and concepts in Australian English". World Englishes. 17 (2): 153–69. doi:10.1111/1467-971X.00089. Dixon et al. (1990) believe there to be some 400 loans in Mainstream Australian English [...] Some Aboriginal expressions have entered the stock of world English vocabulary; witness kangaroo, didgeridoo, koala, [...] Sometimes popular usage deviated markedly from scientific taxonomies, as in the case of the koala which became known as koala bear. [...] Both mallee and mallee scrub, koala and koala bear are common today.
  7. ^ Kidd, D. A. (1973). Collins Latin Gem Dictionary. Collins. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-00-458641-0.
  8. ^ a b Weisbecker, V.; Archer, M. (2008). "Parallel evolution of hand anatomy in kangaroos and vombatiform marsupials: Functional and evolutionary implications". Palaeontology. 51 (2): 321–38. doi:10.1111/j.1475-4983.2007.00750.x.
  9. ^ de Blainville, H. (1816). "Prodrome d'une nouvelle distribution systématique du règne animal". Bulletin de la Société Philomáthique, Paris (in French). 8: 105–24. Archived from the original on 14 October 2018. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Jackson, S. (2010). Koala: Origins of an Icon (2nd ed.). Allen & Unwin. ISBN 978-1-74237-323-2. Archived from the original on 3 February 2021. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  11. ^ Long, J. A. (2002). Prehistoric Mammals of Australia and New Guinea: One Hundred Million Years of Evolution. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 77–82. ISBN 978-0-8018-7223-5.
  12. ^ Asher, R.; Horovitz, I.; Sánchez-Villagra, M. (2004). "First combined cladistic analysis of marsupial mammal interrelationships". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 33 (1): 240–50. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2004.05.004. PMID 15324852.
  13. ^ Beck, R. M. D. (2008). "A dated phylogeny of marsupials using a molecular supermatrix and multiple fossil constraints". Journal of Mammalogy. 89 (1): 175–89. doi:10.1644/06-MAMM-A-437.1.
  14. ^ a b c d e Louys, J.; Aplin, K.; Beck, R. M. D.; Archer, M. (2009). "Cranial anatomy of Oligo-Miocene koalas (Diprotodontia: Phascolarctidae): Stages in the evolution of an extreme leaf-eating specialization". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 29 (4): 981–92. doi:10.1671/039.029.0412. S2CID 86356713.
  15. ^ Archer, M.; Arena, R.; Bassarova, M.; Black, K.; Brammall, J.; Cooke, B. M.; Creaser, P; Crosby, K.; Gillespie, A.; Godthelp, H.; Gott, M.; Hand, S. J.; Kear, B. P.; Krikmann, A.; Mackness, B.; Muirhead, J.; Musser, A.; Myers, T.; Pledge, N. S.; Wang, Y.; Wroe, S. (1999). "The evolutionary history and diversity of Australian mammals". Australian Mammalogy. 21: 1–45. doi:10.1071/AM99001. Archived from the original on 12 August 2021. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  16. ^ Black, K.; Archer, M.; Hand, S. J. (2012). "New Tertiary koala (Marsupialia, Phascolarctidae) from Riversleigh, Australia, with a revision of phascolarctid phylogenetics, paleoecology, and paleobiodiversity". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 32 (1): 125–38. doi:10.1080/02724634.2012.626825. S2CID 86152273.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h Tyndale-Biscoe, H. (2005). Life of Marsupials. CSIRO Publishing. ISBN 978-0-643-06257-3. Archived from the original on 23 January 2016. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  18. ^ Price, G. J. (2008). "Is the modern koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) a derived dwarf of a Pleistocene giant? Implications for testing megafauna extinction hypotheses". Quaternary Science Reviews. 27 (27–28): 2516–21. Bibcode:2008QSRv...27.2516P. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2008.08.026. Archived from the original on 13 August 2021. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  19. ^ a b Price, G. J. (2013). "Long-term trends in lineage 'health' of the Australian koala (Mammalia: Phascolarctidae): Using paleo-diversity to prioritize species for conservation". In Louys, J. (ed.). Paleontology in Ecology and Conservation. Springer Earth System Sciences. Springer. pp. 171–92. ISBN 978-3-642-25037-8.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj Martin, R. W.; Handasyde, K. A. (1999). The Koala: Natural History, Conservation and Management (2nd ed.). New South Wales University Press. ISBN 978-1-57524-136-4. Archived from the original on 6 April 2015. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  21. ^ a b Houlden, B. A.; Costello, B. H.; Sharkey, D.; Fowler, E. V.; Melzer, A.; Ellis, W.; Carrick, F.; Baverstock, P. R.; Elphinstone, M. S. (1999). "Phylogeographic differentiation in the mitochondrial control region in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss 1817)". Molecular Ecology. 8 (6): 999–1011. doi:10.1046/j.1365-294x.1999.00656.x. PMID 10434420. S2CID 36771770.
  22. ^ Houlden, B. A.; England, P. R.; Taylor A. C.; Greville, W. D.; Sherwin, W. B. (1996). "Low genetic variability of the koala Phascolarctos cinereus in south-eastern Australia following a severe population bottleneck". Molecular Ecology. 5 (2): 269–81. doi:10.1046/j.1365-294x.1996.00089.x. PMID 8673272. S2CID 22441918.
  23. ^ Wilmer, J. M. W.; Melzer, A.; Carrick, F.; Moritz, C. (1993). "Low genetic diversity and inbreeding depression in Queensland Koalas". Wildlife Research. 20 (2): 177–87. doi:10.1071/WR9930177.
  24. ^ Tsangaras, K.; Ávila-Arcos, M. C.; Ishida, Y.; Helgen, K. M.; Roca, A. L.; Greenwood, A. D. (2012). "Historically low mitochondrial DNA diversity in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)". BMC Genetics. 13 (1): 92. doi:10.1186/1471-2156-13-92. PMC 3518249. PMID 23095716.
  25. ^ Lee, K. E.; Seddon, J. M.; Corley, S.; Williams, E.; Johnston, S.; Villers, D.; Preece, H.; Carrick, F. (2010). "Genetic variation and structuring in the threatened koala populations of Southeast Queensland". Conservation Genetics. 11 (6): 2091–103. doi:10.1007/s10592-009-9987-9. S2CID 36855057.
  26. ^ Davey, M. (10 April 2013). "Australians crack the code of koala's genetic blueprint". The Age. Archived from the original on 14 May 2013. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  27. ^ a b c Nowak, R. (2005). Walker's Marsupials of the World. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 135–36. ISBN 978-0-8018-8211-1.
  28. ^ a b c d e Jackson, S. (2003). Australian Mammals: Biology and Captive Management. CSIRO Publishing. pp. 147–51. ISBN 978-0-643-06635-9.
  29. ^ Young, A. H. (1879). "The Male Generative Organs of the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)". Journal of Anatomy and Physiology. 13 (Pt 3): 305–317. PMC 1309851. PMID 17231260.
  30. ^ "UQ researchers unlock another koala secret". UQ News. University of Queensland. 9 May 2001. Archived from the original on 12 May 2013. Retrieved 26 June 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d "Physical Characteristics". Australian Koala Foundation. Archived from the original on 28 April 2013. Retrieved 2 April 2013.
  32. ^ Degabriele, R.; Dawson, T. J. (1979). "Metabolism and heat balance in an arboreal marsupial, the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)". Journal of Comparative Physiology B. 134 (4): 293–301. doi:10.1007/BF00709996. ISSN 1432-1351. S2CID 31042136.
  33. ^ Coppock, C. A. (2007). Contrast: An Investigator's Basic Reference Guide to Fingerprint Identification Concepts. Charles C Thomas Publisher. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-398-08514-8.
  34. ^ Carmen de Miguel; Maciej Henneberg (1998). "Encephalization of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus". Australian Mammalogy. 20 (3): 315–320. doi:10.1071/AM98315. Archived from the original on 17 March 2022. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  35. ^ a b Charlton, B. D.; Frey, R.; McKinnon, A. J.; Fritsch, G.; Fitch, W. T.; Reby, D. (2013). "Koalas use a novel vocal organ to produce unusually low-pitched mating calls". Current Biology. 23 (23): R1035–6. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2013.10.069. PMID 24309276.
  36. ^ "Koalas' low-pitched voice explained by unique organ". ScienceDaily. 2 December 2013. Archived from the original on 24 August 2018. Retrieved 9 March 2018.
  37. ^ Lee, A. L.; Martin, R. W. (1988). The Koala: A Natural History. New South Wales University Press. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-86840-354-0.
  38. ^ Logan, M. (2001). "Evidence for the occurrence of rumination-like behaviour, or merycism, in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus, Goldfuss)". Journal of Zoology. 255 (1): 83–87. doi:10.1017/S0952836901001121.
  39. ^ Johnson, R. N.; et al. (2018). "Adaptation and conservation insights from the koala genome". Nature Genetics. 50 (8): 1102–1111. doi:10.1038/s41588-018-0153-5. hdl:2440/115861. PMC 6197426. PMID 29967444.
  40. ^ a b c McGregor, D. C.; Kerr, S. E.; Krockenberger, A. K. (2013). Festa-Bianchet, Marco (ed.). "The distribution and abundance of an island population of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in the far north of their geographic range". PLOS ONE. 8 (3): e59713. Bibcode:2013PLoSO...859713M. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059713. PMC 3601071. PMID 23527258.
  41. ^ "Species Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss, 1817)". Australian Faunal Directory. Australian Government. Archived from the original on 12 February 2022. Retrieved 12 February 2022.
  42. ^ "Preserving Bangham Forest". The Border Chronicle. Vol. 29, no. 1477. South Australia. 22 January 1937. p. 6. Archived from the original on 17 March 2022. Retrieved 18 February 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  43. ^ "Early Days of Eyre Peninsula". Port Lincoln Times. Vol. VIII, no. 425. South Australia. 1 November 1935. p. 3. Archived from the original on 17 March 2022. Retrieved 12 February 2022 – via National Library of Australia.
  44. ^ Smith, A. G.; McAlpine, C. A.; Rhodes, J. R.; Lunney, D.; Seabrook, L.; Baxter, G. (2013). "Out on a limb: Habitat use of a specialist folivore, the koala, at the edge of its range in a modified semi-arid landscape". Landscape Ecology. 28 (3): 418–26. doi:10.1007/s10980-013-9846-4. S2CID 8031502.
  45. ^ Martin, R. (2001). "Koala". In Macdonald, D. (ed.). Encyclopedia of Mammals (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. pp. 852–854. ISBN 978-0-7607-1969-5.
  46. ^ Osawa, R. (1993). "Dietary preferences of Koalas, Phascolarctos cinereus (Marsupiala: Phascolarctidae) for Eucalyptus spp. with a specific reference to their simple sugar contents". Australian Mammalogy. 16 (1): 85–88. doi:10.1071/AM93020. S2CID 239130362. Archived from the original on 24 April 2016. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  47. ^ "Phascolarctos cinereus". Animal Diversity Web. Retrieved 21 April 2022.
  48. ^ Grand, T. I.; Barboza, P. S. (2001). "Anatomy and development of the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus: An evolutionary perspective on the superfamily Vombatoidea". Anatomy and Embryology. 203 (3): 211–223. doi:10.1007/s004290000153. PMID 11303907. S2CID 11662113.
  49. ^ "Koalas hug trees to keep cool". Australian Geographic. 4 June 2014. Archived from the original on 22 November 2014. Retrieved 18 November 2014.
  50. ^ Gill, Victoria (4 June 2014). "Koalas hug trees to lose heat". BBC News. Archived from the original on 18 June 2018. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  51. ^ Ellis, W. A.; Hale, P. T.; Carrick, F. (2002). "Breeding dynamics of koalas in open woodlands". Wildlife Research. 29 (1): 19–25. doi:10.1071/WR01042.
  52. ^ Smith, M. (1980). "Behaviour of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss), in captivity IV. Scent-marking". Australian Wildlife Research. 7 (1): 35–40. doi:10.1071/WR9800035.
  53. ^ a b Tobey, J. R.; Nute, T. R.; Bercovitch, F. B. (2009). "Age and seasonal changes in the semiochemicals of the sternal gland secretions of male koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)". Australian Journal of Zoology. 57 (2): 111–18. doi:10.1071/ZO08090.
  54. ^ a b Smith, M. (1980). "Behaviour of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss), in captivity III*. Vocalisations". Australian Wildlife Research. 7 (1): 13–34. doi:10.1071/WR9800013.
  55. ^ Ellis, W.; Bercovitch, F.; FitzGibbon, S.; Roe, P.; Wimmer, J.; Melzer, A.; Wilson, R. (2011). "Koala bellows and their association with the spatial dynamics of free-ranging koalas". Behavioral Ecology. 22 (2): 372–77. doi:10.1093/beheco/arq216.
  56. ^ Charlton, B. D.; Ellis, W. A. H.; McKinnon, A. J.; Cowin, G. J.; Brumm, J.; Nilsson, K.; Fitch, W. T. (2011). "Cues to body size in the formant spacing of male koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) bellows: Honesty in an exaggerated trait". Journal of Experimental Biology. 214 (20): 3414–22. doi:10.1242/jeb.061358. PMID 21957105.
  57. ^ Charlton, B. D.; Ellis, W. A. H.; Brumm, J.; Nilsson, K.; Fitch, W. T. (2012). "Female koalas prefer bellows in which lower formants indicate larger males". Animal Behaviour. 84 (6): 1565–71. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.09.034. S2CID 53175246.
  58. ^ a b Smith, M. (1980). "Behaviour of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss), in captivity VI*. Aggression". Australian Wildlife Research. 7 (2): 177–90. doi:10.1071/WR9800177.
  59. ^ Gifford, A.; Fry, G.; Houlden, B. A.; Fletcher, T. P.; Deane, E. M. (2002). "Gestational length in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus". Animal Reproduction Science. 70 (3): 261–66. doi:10.1016/S0378-4320(02)00010-6. PMID 11943495.
  60. ^ Ellis, W. A. H.; Bercovitch, F. B. (2011). "Body size and sexual selection in the koala". Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 65 (6): 1229–35. doi:10.1007/s00265-010-1136-4. S2CID 26046352.
  61. ^ Lanyon, Janet M.; Sanson, G. D. (1986). "Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) dentition and nutrition. II. Implications of tooth wear in nutrition". Journal of Zoology. Wiley. 209 (2): 169–181. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.1986.tb03573.x. ISSN 0952-8369.
  62. ^ Spratt, D. M.; Gill, P. A. (1998). "Durikainema phascolarcti n. sp. (Nematoda: Muspiceoidea: Robertdollfusidae) from the pulmonary arteries of the koala Phascolarctos cinereus with associated pathological changes" (PDF). Systematic Parasitology. 39 (2): 101–06. doi:10.1023/A:1005957809179. S2CID 26037401.
  63. ^ McInnes, L. M.; Gillett, A.; Hanger, J.; Reid, S. A.; Ryan, U. M. (27 April 2011). "The potential impact of native Australian trypanosome infections on the health of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus)". Parasitology. Cambridge University Press (CUP). 138 (7): 873–883. doi:10.1017/s0031182011000369. ISSN 0031-1820.
  64. ^ Stoye, J. P. (2006). "Koala retrovirus: A genome invasion in real time". Genome Biology. 7 (11): 241. doi:10.1186/gb-2006-7-11-241. PMC 1794577. PMID 17118218.
  65. ^ Adams-Hosking, C.; Grantham, H. S.; Rhodes, J. R.; McAlpine, C.; Moss, P. T. (2011). "Modelling climate-change-induced shifts in the distribution of the koala". Wildlife Research. 38 (2): 122–30. doi:10.1071/WR10156.
  66. ^ Phillips, Bill (1990). Koalas : the little Australians we'd all hate to lose. Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service. p. 13. ISBN 978-0-644-09697-3. OCLC 21532917.
  67. ^ The Sydney Gazette, 21 August 1803, p.3
  68. ^ Home, E. (1808). "An account of some peculiarities in the anatomical structure of the wombat, with observations on the female organs of generation". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. 98: 304–12. doi:10.1098/rstl.1808.0020. S2CID 108450983. Archived from the original on 15 October 2015. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  69. ^ Perry, G. (1811). "Koalo, or New Holland Sloth". Arcana; or the Museum of Natural History: 109. Archived from the original on 15 October 2015. Retrieved 9 November 2015.
  70. ^ Owen, R. (1836). "Richard Owen, esq., in the chair". Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. 4 (1): 109–13. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.1836.tb01376.x. Archived from the original on 14 August 2017. Retrieved 20 February 2018.
  71. ^ Caldwell, H. (1884). "On the arrangement of the embryonic membranes in marsupial mammals". Quarterly Journal of Microscopical Science. s2–24 (96): 655–658. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 14 June 2013.
  72. ^ "Teddy will be missed". Boca Raton News. 15 March 1976. Archived from the original on 4 September 2015. Retrieved 16 August 2013.
  73. ^ "100 greatest TV spots of all time". Drew Babb & Associates. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013.
  74. ^ "Platinum Australian Koala". Goldline.com. 13 October 2018. Archived from the original on 20 September 2013. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  75. ^ David Wood, "Yarns spun around campfire", in Country News, byline, 2 May 2005. Retrieved 4 April 2008 Archived 10 May 2005 at the Wayback Machine
  76. ^ Seal, Graham (2010). Great Australian Stories: Legends, Yarns and Tall Tales. ReadHowYouWant.com. p. 136. ISBN 9781458716811. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 15 July 2016.
  77. ^ "At Koala Park". The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954). NSW: National Library of Australia. 28 November 1934. p. 14. Archived from the original on 17 March 2022. Retrieved 14 May 2013.
  78. ^ Donnison, Jon (16 November 2014). "G20 summit: Koalas and 'shirtfronting'". BBC News. Archived from the original on 12 November 2020. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  79. ^ Dimitrova, Kami (16 November 2014). "President Obama, Putin Cozy Up With Koalas at G20 Summit" Archived 3 March 2021 at the Wayback Machine. ABC News. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  80. ^ Harris Rimmer, Susan (18 November 2014). "Koala diplomacy: Australian soft power saves the day at G20" Archived 27 February 2021 at the Wayback Machine. The Conversation. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  81. ^ Arup, Tom (26 December 2014). "The rise and influence of koala diplomacy" Archived 17 January 2021 at the Wayback Machine. The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  82. ^ "Oxford Word of the Month - December: koala diplomacy" Archived 17 March 2022 at the Wayback Machine. Oxford University Press, 28 November 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  83. ^ "Koala diplomacy as furry envoys return to Australia" Archived 13 June 2021 at the Wayback Machine. Media release, Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, 10 February 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  84. ^ Markwell, Kevin & Cushing, Nancy (20 May 2015). "Koalas, platypuses and pandas and the power of soft diplomacy" Archived 5 March 2021 at the Wayback Machine. The Conversation. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  85. ^ "Phascolarctos cinereus (combined populations of Qld, NSW and the ACT) — Koala (combined populations of Queensland, New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory)". SPRAT. Australian Government. 2022. Archived from the original on 11 February 2022. Retrieved 12 February 2022.
  86. ^ Cox, Lisa (11 February 2022). "Koala listed as endangered after Australian governments fail to halt its decline". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 10 February 2022. Retrieved 11 February 2022.
  87. ^ TONY BURKE, Minister for Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (27 April 2012). "Determination that a distinct population of biological entities is a species for the purposes of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (132)". Australian Government - Federal Register of Legislation. Archived from the original on 12 February 2022. Retrieved 12 February 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  88. ^ Christine Adams-Hosking (May 2017). Current status of the koala in Queensland and New South Wales (Report). WWF Australia. Archived from the original on 9 April 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  89. ^ "Koalas added to threatened species list". ABC. 30 April 2012. Archived from the original on 10 May 2012. Retrieved 2 May 2012.
  90. ^ "Koala declared endangered as disease, lost habitat take toll". AP. 11 February 2022. Archived from the original on 13 February 2022. Retrieved 13 February 2022.
  91. ^ Buchholz, Katharina (27 November 2019). "Infographic: The Worrying Decline of Koala Populations". Statista Infographics. Archived from the original on 14 February 2022. Retrieved 14 February 2022.
  92. ^ "Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) Fact Sheet: Population & Conservation Status". San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance. June 2021. Archived from the original on 14 February 2022. Retrieved 14 February 2022.
  93. ^ a b Holtcamp, W. (5 January 2007). "Will Urban Sprawl KO the Koala?". National Wildlife. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 22 March 2013.
  94. ^ "Cars and dogs threaten koala future". University of Queensland News. 14 February 2006. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  95. ^ "How to keep koalas off the road - Koala Vehicle Strike Fact sheet 2" (PDF). NSW Government. June 2020. ISBN 978-1-922431-20-2. Archived (PDF) from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  96. ^ "Koalas and resilient habitat in the Sutherland Shire". Sutherland Shire Environment Centre. September 2021. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  97. ^ Moore, Tony (26 July 2016). "Koalas tunnels and bridges prove effective on busy roads". Brisbane Times. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  98. ^ "Clever koalas learn to cross the road safely". BBC News. 27 July 2016. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  99. ^ Foden, W.; Stuart, S. N. (2009). Species and Climate Change: More than Just the Polar Bear (PDF) (Report). IUCN Species Survival Commission. pp. 36–37. Archived (PDF) from the original on 15 March 2016. Retrieved 10 November 2016.
  100. ^ Griffith, J. E.; Dhand, N. K.; Krockenberger, M. B.; Higgins, D. P. (2013). "A retrospective study of admission trends of koalas to a rehabilitation facility over 30 years" (PDF). Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 49 (1): 18–28. doi:10.7589/2012-05-135. hdl:2123/14628. PMID 23307368. S2CID 32878079. Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 July 2018. Retrieved 24 September 2019.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Koala: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN

The koala or, inaccurately, koala bear (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial native to Australia. It is the only extant representative of the family Phascolarctidae and its closest living relatives are the wombats. The koala is found in coastal areas of the mainland's eastern and southern regions, inhabiting Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, and South Australia. It is easily recognisable by its stout, tailless body and large head with round, fluffy ears and large, spoon-shaped nose. The koala has a body length of 60–85 cm (24–33 in) and weighs 4–15 kg (9–33 lb). Fur colour ranges from silver grey to chocolate brown. Koalas from the northern populations are typically smaller and lighter in colour than their counterparts further south. These populations possibly are separate subspecies, but this is disputed.

Koalas typically inhabit open Eucalyptus woodland, the leaves of these trees make up most of their diet. Because this eucalypt diet has limited nutritional and caloric content, koalas are largely sedentary and sleep up to 20 hours a day. They are asocial animals, and bonding exists only between mothers and dependent offspring. Adult males communicate with loud bellows that intimidate rivals and attract mates. Males mark their presence with secretions from scent glands located on their chests. Being marsupials, koalas give birth to underdeveloped young that crawl into their mothers' pouches, where they stay for the first six to seven months of their lives. These young koalas, known as joeys, are fully weaned around a year old. Koalas have few natural predators and parasites, but are threatened by various pathogens, such as Chlamydiaceae bacteria and the koala retrovirus.

Because of its distinctive appearance, the koala is recognised worldwide as a symbol of Australia. They were hunted by Indigenous Australians and depicted in myths and cave art for millennia. The first recorded encounter between a European and a koala was in 1798, and an image of the animal was published in 1810 by naturalist George Perry. Botanist Robert Brown wrote the first detailed scientific description of the koala in 1814, although his work remained unpublished for 180 years. Popular artist John Gould illustrated and described the koala, introducing the species to the general British public. Further details about the animal's biology were revealed in the 19th century by several English scientists. Koalas are listed as a vulnerable species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Among the many threats to their existence are habitat destruction caused by agriculture, urbanisation, droughts and associated bushfires, some related to climate change. In February of 2022, the koala was officially listed as endangered in the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Queensland.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Koala

provided by wikipedia FR

Phascolarctos cinereus

Le koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), appelé aussi Paresseux australien, est une espèce de marsupial arboricole herbivore endémique d'Australie et le seul représentant encore vivant de la famille des Phascolarctidés. On le trouve dans les régions côtières de l'Australie-Méridionale et orientale, d'Adélaïde à la partie sud de la péninsule du cap York. Les populations s'étendent aussi sur des distances considérables dans l'arrière-pays australien (outback), là où l'humidité est suffisante pour le maintien de forêts. Les koalas d'Australie-Méridionale furent exterminés au début du XXe siècle, mais cet État fédéré a depuis été repeuplé grâce à des transferts du Victoria. Cet animal n'était plus présent ni en Tasmanie, ni en Australie-Occidentale, mais il y a été réintroduit[1],[2].

Le koala est étroitement lié à l'eucalyptus ou gommier, dont il ne mange que les feuilles de certaines espèces. Les mâles peuvent vivre en moyenne 15 ans, et les femelles 20 ans.

C'est, avec le kangourou, l'un des principaux symboles de l'Australie. Après avoir été chassé massivement pour sa fourrure, il est aujourd'hui principalement menacé par la fragilité et le recul de son biotope. Il reste moins de 80 000 koalas vivant en liberté et ce nombre continue de décliner. Les koalas disparaissent à cause des menaces qui pèsent sur leur habitat et des vagues de chaleur dues au réchauffement climatique[3]. Ils ont ainsi perdu 80 % de leur habitat naturel[4].

Sommaire

Étymologie

Le mot « koala » vient du darug gula, qui signifie « pas d'eau »[5]. On pensait qu'étant donné que ces animaux ne descendaient pas souvent des arbres, ils pouvaient survivre sans boire. Les feuilles d'eucalyptus ont une teneur élevée en eau, donc le koala n'a pas besoin de boire souvent[6], l'idée qu'ils n'aient pas du tout besoin de boire de l'eau s'étant avérée être un mythe[7]. Bien que la voyelle « u » ait été retranscrite dans l'orthographe anglaise par « oo » (avec des orthographes telles que coola ou koolah), elle a été changée en « oa », peut-être par erreur[8]. En raison de la supposée ressemblance du koala avec l'ours, il a souvent été appelé à tort koala ours (« koala bear » en anglais), en particulier par les premiers colons[9]. Le nom générique, Phascolarctos, est dérivé des mots grecs phaskolos « poche » et arktos « ours ». Le nom spécifique, cinereus, signifie « cendré » en latin, en raison de sa couleur.

Description

Avec son petit corps trapu, ses membres courts et ses grandes oreilles rondes, le koala ressemble au wombat, son plus proche cousin non éteint, qui vit également en Australie mais qu'on rencontre non pas dans les forêts australiennes mais en montagne. La fourrure du koala est cependant plus épaisse, ses oreilles bien plus grandes et ses membres plus longs.

Morphologie

Poids et taille

Le koala mesure entre 61 et 85 cm et pèse entre 4 et 14 kg pour l'espèce type. Les mensurations et les proportions d'un animal adulte dépendent de l'âge, du sexe, de l'alimentation et de la région. Dans les climats plus frais, les koalas sont en général plus gros. Les mâles adultes peuvent atteindre jusqu'à 14 kg, les femelles jusqu'à 11 kg. La moyenne pondérale des animaux des régions septentrionales est plus faible, les mâles atteignant 12 kg et les femelles 8 kg. Les koalas du Queensland, région aux faibles précipitations, sont généralement plus petits : le poids moyen des mâles atteint 8 kg, celui des femelles 6 kg. (Voir sous-espèces).

Fourrure

Le koala a une fourrure laineuse marron-gris argenté, qu'il entretient régulièrement, ce qui permet à l'eau de pluie de perler comme sur le plumage d'un canard. Cette couleur lui permet de passer inaperçu parmi les branches d'eucalyptus[10]. Les poils des oreilles forment des franges blanches. La fourrure plus dense du postérieur sert aussi de coussin à l'animal.

La fourrure compte 55 poils/mm2 ; celle du dos couvre 77 % de son corps, contre 13 % pour celle du ventre. La longueur des poils et leur densité dépend de la saison, avec une diminution en été. Moins épaisse et moins foncée chez les individus des régions plus chaudes, la fourrure joue un rôle d'isolation thermique important. Même par fort vent froid, sa capacité ne baisse que de 14 %, niveau comparable à celui de la faune arctique.

Il existe des mutations génétiques affectant la coloration de la fourrure. Quelques rares koalas sont albinos : en l'absence de mélanine, ils n'ont qu'un léger marquage doré sur un pelage presque blanc, des yeux rouges et le nez rose[11]. Très rarement également, les koalas peuvent avoir une fourrure blanche en raison d'un leucistisme : leur poil est blanc mais le nez et les yeux pigmentés normalement[12].

Tête

Les oreilles sont rondes et poilues, le chanfrein noir et glabre, le nez glabre et sombre et très bombé. Ce nez proéminent et ces grandes oreilles montrent que l'olfaction et l'audition jouent un rôle important dans sa vie. Le koala possède une grosse tête comparativement à son corps, dont la masse cérébrale est relativement faible. Le cerveau des ancêtres du koala moderne remplissait auparavant toute la boite crânienne mais s'est réduit considérablement avec l'espèce actuelle. C'est une dégénérescence que les scientifiques interprètent comme une adaptation à un régime énergétiquement pauvre[13]. C'est un des plus petits cerveaux chez les marsupiaux et chez les mammifères en général, car il représente seulement 0,2 % de sa masse pondérale[14]. Environ 40 % de la cavité crânienne sont remplis de liquide cérébro-spinal, tandis que les deux hémisphères cérébraux sont comme « une paire de cerneaux de noix ratatinés en haut du tronc cérébral, sans contact, ni entre eux, ni avec aucun des os du crâne »[15].

Contrairement aux autres marsupiaux, la fente des pupilles est verticale chez le koala.

Membres

Les koalas ont cinq doigts et orteils à l'extrémité de chaque membre. Les deux premiers doigts des pattes antérieures sont opposables aux trois autres, et les trois premiers des pattes postérieures aux deux autres[16], ce qui leur permet de grimper plus facilement aux arbres[17]. Le koala possède une main préhensile. Avec ses griffes pointues et aiguisées et ses coussinets rugueux, elle leur permet de saisir des branches et de grimper aux arbres. Ses pieds sont munis d'un pouce sans griffe et les deuxième et troisième orteils ont fusionné, comme pour tous les membres des diprotodontes. Cette syndactylie permet aux griffes voisines de fonctionner comme un peigne et d'éliminer les tiques dont il souffre souvent. C'est l'un des rares animaux, avec les primates, à disposer d'empreintes digitales et ces dermatoglyphes sont comparables aux empreintes digitales humaines, de sorte qu'il est difficile d'en distinguer l'origine[18],[19],[20]. Le pelvis et le bassin sont statiques, ce qui peut le gêner dans certains de ses mouvements[21].

Colonne vertébrale et queue

Squelette de koala accroché à une branche morte
Squelette de koala.

Le koala possède 6 à 7 vertèbres caudales, en comparaison du wombat qui en a 12 à 13[22].

Le koala est le seul marsupial dépourvu de queue. Comme chez l'humain, elle n'existe qu'à l'état de vestige. Sa morphologie en bouteille lui permet cependant d'assurer une bonne stabilité lorsqu’il est à la fourche des branches.

Physiologie

Le caryotype du koala est 2n=16 chromosomes. En raison du déroulement particulier de la gestation et de la naissance chez les marsupiaux, les koalas ne possèdent pas d'ombilic.

La température corporelle est, avec 36,6 °C, légèrement inférieure à la moyenne des autres mammifères. Leur cœur bat entre 70 et 140 fois par minute (en fonction de divers facteurs, dont l'âge du koala). Le pouls est cependant difficile à mesurer car les koalas ont une arythmie sinusale, ce qui signifie que leur pouls et leur respiration ne sont pas synchronisés. Les modifications du pouls ne reflètent pas véritablement le travail du cœur[23].

Adaptations liées au régime à base d'eucalyptus

schéma en coupe de profil des machoires et de la denture d'un koala
Denture d'un koala, de gauche à droite : molaires, prémolaires (en sombre), diastème, canines, incisives.
Formule dentaire mâchoire supérieure 4 1 1 3 3 1 1 4 4 1 0 1 1 0 1 4 mâchoire inférieure Total : 30 Denture des koalas

Leurs mâchoires massives et leurs dents sont adaptées à leur régime herbivore spécialisé dans l'eucalyptus tout en restant comparables à celles de tous les diprotodontés comme les kangourous et les wombats. Les muscles masticateurs sont puissants. Ils ont des incisives tranchantes, pour couper les feuilles, séparées par un vaste diastème des molaires qui servent à les broyer. Le koala possède aussi des abajoues.

Le cæcum d'une longueur exceptionnelle de 2,5 m en forme d'appendice, leur permet de digérer cette nourriture indigeste. (cf.Régime alimentaire).

C'est d'ailleurs en raison du manque d'apport énergétique suffisant que le métabolisme des koalas s'est adapté pour devenir l'un des plus lents du monde animal.

Capacités sensorielles

Essentiellement nocturne, le koala possède une bonne ouïe et une vision plutôt médiocre. Son gros nez est particulièrement sensible aux odeurs et l'informe sur ce qui concerne sa survie, son territoire et les possibilités d'accouplement, il lui permet de reconnaître les feuilles d'eucalyptus qui ne doivent pas contenir trop de toxines, mais aussi la présence d'ennemis dans les parages, les marquages odorants étrangers selon le sexe ainsi que la présence de couples mère-enfant.

Dimorphisme sexuel

Koala mâle au scrotum proéminent dans la fourche d'un eucalyptus
Koala mâle.
Koala femelle dans la fourche d'un eucalyptus
Koala femelle.

Le dimorphisme sexuel est marqué chez les koalas. Les mâles adultes peuvent être jusqu'à deux fois plus gros que les femelles adultes et possèdent une courbure du nez plus crochue ainsi qu'une tête d'une forme un peu différente. Les mâles se différencient aussi des femelles par leur scrotum et leurs glandes pectorales odorifères, leur large menton et leurs oreilles plus petites. Le koala mâle, est doté d'un pénis de 1,9 cm de long au gland bifide[24]. Les femelles se caractérisent par leur poche ventrale, un menton plus pointu et une tête plus fine. La poche, comme chez les wombats et contrairement aux kangourous, est munie d'une ouverture dirigée vers le bas et l'arrière. Elle ne contient que deux tétons pour alimenter le bébé. La femelle possède deux vagins latéraux et deux utérus séparés, trait commun à tous les marsupiaux[25].

Répartition et habitat

Répartition

carte d'Australie montrant la distribution du Koala
Répartition du koala en 2008 selon l'UICN. En marron, les zones d'implantation actuelles, en rouge, les zones de réintroduction après extinction locale.

Les koalas étaient à l'origine très répandus en Australie. Chassés pour leur fourrure, ils ont été éradiqués dans de nombreuses régions. Par la suite, ils ont pu être partiellement réintroduits. Des populations plus importantes se trouvent le long de la côte orientale de l'Australie, au Queensland, à partir de Cooktown jusqu'en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud et au Victoria, ainsi que dans certaines régions de l'arrière-pays (Outback), où suffisamment d'arbres sont disponibles pour leur alimentation. À l'arrivée des Européens, les koalas occupaient jusqu'à six îles des côtes est et sud-est. Depuis 1870, ils ont été introduits dans au moins 20 îles. La réserve de l'Île Kangourou, au large d'Adélaïde, en est un exemple, ainsi qu'une île située en Tasmanie, région où il n'y a jamais eu de koalas[21]. La population globale est évaluée en 2009 entre 43 000 et 80 000 individus, comparativement à 100 000 en 2003[26].

Habitat

carte de la végétation australienne
Zones de végétation en Australie. Zones pertinentes pour le koala :
1 : forêt humide,
2 : haute forêt claire,
3 : forêt claire d'eucalyptus,
4 : savane tropicale d'eucalyptus,
5 : forêt claire humide d'eucalyptus,
6 : forêt claire sèche d'eucalyptus.

Les populations de koalas ne peuvent se développer que dans des espaces vitaux qui remplissent des conditions spécifiques. Un espace vital adapté comporte des arbres privilégiés par les koalas (principalement des espèces d'eucalyptus, mais aussi quelques autres) en association particulière sur un sol adapté ainsi que suffisamment de précipitations. Un critère supplémentaire consiste en la présence obligatoire d'autres koalas à proximité. De tels espaces vitaux sont constitués par les forêts claires d'eucalyptus, dans lesquelles les autres espèces d'arbres ne sont représentées que de manière isolée. Selon les régions, on les retrouve dans les forêts humides d'altitude, dans les forêts tropophiles ou dans les fourrés de lianes. Ils préfèrent les arbres les plus grands. La régulation des populations se fait alors par la toxicité des feuilles, la distribution éparse des eucalyptus, le métabolisme lent des koalas et le besoin de pertes limitées en eau par évaporation (ce qui veut dire trouver un arbre adapté pour le repos pendant la journée[21]. La taille des populations de koalas est directement liée à celle des espaces vitaux et au nombre et à la densité d'espèces d'eucalyptus pertinentes pour leur alimentation. Si un espace vital se réduit ou est parcellisé, sa capacité porteuse écologique en est réduite proportionnellement à sa superficie. À cause de la déforestation et des incendies de forêts, de nombreuses anciennes zones de diffusion des koalas ont maintenant franchi le seuil minimal nécessaire à la conservation d'une population stable.

Fréquemment, dans les zones soumises à la déforestation, les koalas vivent dans un environnement de type steppique aux arbres plutôt isolés, qui dans le pire des cas se trouve à proximité d'une route. Dans ce cas, les territoires sont plus grands, seule manière de s'assurer un nombre suffisant d'arbres destinés à l'alimentation. On les retrouve aussi dans les espaces verts plantés d'eucalyptus dans les villes, qui ne sont néanmoins pas des espaces vitaux adaptés. Les animaux sont alors le plus souvent victimes des automobiles, des chiens, des piscines et autres dangers liés à l'homme.

Comportement et écologie

Périodes d'activité

Bien que le koala soit considéré comme étant principalement nocturne, certaines activités ont lieu la journée. Une étude récente a même démontré que les koalas parcouraient presque la même distance le jour que la nuit (53,6 m le jour, 63,3 la nuit). Par contre l'arbre destiné à l'alimentation la nuit est souvent différent de celui utilisé pour le repos la journée[21].

Les koalas sont arboricoles et passent la plupart de leur vie dans la canopée. Pour s'économiser, vu leur régime faiblement énergétique, ils dorment jusqu'à 20 heures par jour et donc plus longuement que les paresseux, qui, en captivité tout du moins, dorment jusqu'à 19 heures par jour. Même quand ils ne dorment pas, ils restent habituellement immobiles. Ils s'activent plus la nuit en quête de nourriture. Ils passent une à quatre heures par jour à manger, ce qui se passe en quatre à six sessions par jour d'une durée de 14 min à deux heures. Le temps restant est utilisé pour se nettoyer, bouger d'arbre en arbre ou consacré à des activités sociales.

Vie arboricole

Koala dans un arbre, se grattant et se nettoyant.

Les koalas passent la majeure partie de leur vie dans les arbres, les eucalyptus. Ces arboricoles sont de bons grimpeurs au corps élancé et musclé. Ils ont un corps court, ramassé, mais des membres relativement longs. Leurs mains, pieds et griffes sont adaptés à la saisie de branches, à l'agrippement aux troncs et au maintien de l'équilibre. En cas de danger, les koalas cherchent instinctivement à se protéger dans les branches d'un arbre. Dans les implantations humaines, ils escaladent les murs, les clôtures, les pylônes d'éclairage et les panneaux de signalisation.

Les koalas sautent habilement d'arbre en arbre et ne descendent au sol que rarement, en général pour aller sur un arbre inatteignable par le saut. Ils n'apprécient que très modérément d'être au sol car ils doivent alors adopter une posture quadripède pour avancer. C'est là qu'ils courent le plus de dangers. Les mâles sont d'un caractère plus aventureux que les femelles lorsqu'il s'agit de grimper sur de nouveaux arbres et peuvent parcourir jusqu'à 10 km pour les atteindre.

Certains koalas restent plus longtemps que d'autres sur le sol. Ce comportement dépend de la taille de leur territoire et de la distance entre les arbres. À proximité d'implantations humaines, ils doivent souvent parcourir de plus longues distances au sol que dans un environnement préservé.

Dans leurs arbres-maisons, confortables et sûres, les koalas montrent tout un éventail de postures de détente, qui dépendent des caractéristiques de la fourche de la branche, des conditions météorologiques et de l'avancement de la journée. Comme le temps change dans le bush australien au cours de la journée, les koalas cherchent régulièrement de nouveaux emplacements dans l'arbre, une fois au soleil, une fois à l'ombre, une fois au vent rafraîchissant, une fois à l'abri du vent ou de la pluie.

Les koalas peuvent rester des heures confortablement assis sur une branche. Ils s'agrippent entre les fourches, pour ne pas tomber de cet endroit sûr pour dormir. Leur fourrure particulièrement épaisse à la partie postérieure constitue un doux matelas face aux branches dures et noueuses. Par temps froid, humide et venteux, ils ont tendance à s'enrouler en boule, afin de diminuer leur surface extérieure et de perdre le moins de chaleur possible. L'eau de pluie s'écoule alors sur le dos du koala comme sur celui d'un canard. Lors des journées chaudes, sèches ou chaudes et humides, ils préfèrent une posture déliée, la longue et claire fourrure de leur poitrine reflétant alors la chaleur, tandis qu'elle flotte au vent et permet ainsi de se rafraîchir.

Le koala ne fait pas de nid.

Territoires

Koala redressé dans son arbre en train de guetter au loin
Koala dans son arbre, Phillip Island.

Chaque koala fonde son propre territoire. Sa taille dépend de plusieurs facteurs tels que la qualité de l'habitat, le sexe, l'âge, le statut social et la capacité porteuse de l'espace vital.

La taille du territoire permet dans une population socialement stable de disposer de suffisamment d'arbres appropriés, qui offrent assez de nourriture et de protection au koala. Hors catastrophes et perturbations de son habitat, il peut rester fidèle à son territoire pendant toute sa vie. Pour manger, chercher refuge ou pour entretenir des contacts sociaux, les koalas changent régulièrement d'arbres dans leur territoire. Ils laissent en passant des marques odorantes qui délimitent leur domaine.

Dans une population stable, les territoires se chevauchent entre voisins. Les mâles préfèrent les territoires qui recoupent un ou plusieurs territoires de femelles. Lorsqu'il y a chevauchement de territoires entre mâles, le contact est généralement évité ; ils peuvent cependant s'agresser, provoquant ainsi des blessures, surtout pendant la période de reproduction. Le territoire d'une femelle recoupe les territoires des deux sexes. Avant le départ des jeunes, ceux-ci considèrent le territoire de leur mère comme le leur. Les territoires des mâles, de 2 à 3 hectares en moyenne, sont en général plus grands que celui des femelles.

Les arbres-frontières d'un territoire de koala sont facilement reconnaissables aux nombreuses griffades et aux excréments accumulés. Ils font l'objet de visites régulières. Certains d'entre eux font office de lieu de rencontre, ce qui joue un rôle essentiel pour la stabilité de la population. Alors que les mâles koalas marquent leur territoire de l'odeur de leur glandes pectorales au niveau des tétons, les femelles utilisent l'odeur de leur urine.

Au sein d'un territoire, tout arbre d'alimentation n'est pas utilisé par autorégulation. Ces arbres inutilisés sont défendus tout autant que les autres, et sont donc inatteignables pour les autres koalas. Du fait de ce comportement, la population est maintenue en équilibre, car une reproduction incontrôlée est évitée, ce qui aurait sinon un impact trop fort sur l'espace vital. C'est cette raison qui oblige les jeunes à quitter leur mère. S'ils restaient, ils deviendraient concurrents de leur mère ou d'autres individus pour la nourriture. Les jeunes koalas doivent s'installer en marge des territoires d'une communauté.

Lorsqu'un koala meurt, son territoire est repris par un congénère, mais les frontières restent presque les mêmes. Les jeunes koalas errent souvent pendant des mois en marge d'une colonie avant de pouvoir fonder un territoire durable. Souvent, ils reprennent un territoire vacant. Dans la nature, particulièrement à l'époque de la reproduction, des combats de territoires se produisent.

Groupes sociaux

Les populations de koalas disposent d'un système complexe de communication et d'organisation, qui permet de préserver la cohésion sociale. Même si en dehors de la saison des amours, ils sont des solitaires, ils s'organisent, quand les populations sont stables, dans une hiérarchie sociale, au sein de laquelle ils fondent des territoires se chevauchant et se conforment à leur rang. Si cet ordonnancement est déstabilisé, c'est tout le groupe qui en souffre.

Vocalisation

koala ouvrant la gueule et criant
Koala poussant un cri.

Généralement silencieux, à l'instar de nombreux animaux nocturnes, les koalas utilisent toute une série d'expressions vocales leur permettant de se faire comprendre sur des distances relativement grandes.

Mugissement de parade

Les mâles, et beaucoup plus rarement les femelles, utilisent un cri de parade très fort qui peut s'entendre à près d'un kilomètre pendant la période de reproduction. Il consiste en une série de fortes inspirations toutes suivies d'une expiration de grognement très sonore. Les mâles commencent à faire résonner ce mugissement environ un mois avant l'œstrus des femelles. Ce cri est plus fréquent la nuit et sert à attirer les compagnes et pour écarter les autres mâles. Il sert aussi à maintenir les distances entre les individus. Les autres mâles de la zone répondent souvent à ce cri[21].

Cris de rencontre

À part le mugissement, il existe quatre autres types de cris utilisés lors de rencontres agressives.

  • cris rauques : courts, durs
  • grognements : plus longs (jusqu'à 2 secondes), atonal jusqu'à modérement tonal
  • cris perçants : très aigus, le son voyage plus loin
  • plaintes : plus longues que les cris, similaires aux plaintes d'un chat, elles sont plutôt utilisées par les femelles et les jeunes en désarroi. Ce sont des cris de stress :
Cri de stress

Quand il est stressé, le koala peut pousser un fort cri qui ressemble un peu à celui d'un nourrisson humain[27]. Les femelles autant que les mâles utilisent le cri de stress. Il est émis quand l'individu est stressé et est souvent accompagné de tremblements. Manipuler des koalas peut leur causer ce stress[28] et le problème de l'agression et du stress résultant de cette manipulation fait partie du débat politique en Australie[29],[30].

Cri territorial

Les mâles émettent un aboiement accompagné d'un grognement profond lorsqu'ils veulent annoncer leur présence ou leur position sociale. Souvent cela résonne comme un lointain grondement ou comme une moto qui démarre ; on évoque aussi un croisement entre le grognement gras d'un ivrogne, le grincement d'une porte sur des gonds rouillés et le grognement d'un cochon mécontent. Les mâles font, avec ce cri de position dominante, l'économie de la dépense d'énergie que représente un combat. Pendant l'époque de la reproduction, on aboie beaucoup, pour donner la possibilité aux autres individus de déterminer exactement la position de l'aboyeur.

Les femelles n'aboient pas autant que les mâles. Mais leurs cris servent tout autant à communiquer l'agressivité ou la bonne disposition sexuelle.

Autres sons

Avec les jeunes, les mères échangent de tendres grincements et claquements, mais aussi de légers sons de grondements qui indiquent l'inconfort et la colère. Quelquefois on entend un léger murmure ou un bourdonnement.

Olfaction et marquage

Chez les mâles à partir de 4 ans, les glandes pectorales servent à marquer les arbres, délimitant ainsi les frontières de leur territoire. Ce marquage est le plus fréquent pendant la période de reproduction. Les femelles comme les mâles marquent occasionnellement à l'urine, sur l'arbre ou à sa base.

Jeux

Le jeu est surtout pratiqué par les jeunes koalas, en solitaire ou avec d'autres. Ils grimpent, sautent ou se poursuivent les uns les autres[21].

Locomotion

Leur mode de vie est principalement arboricole (voir Vie arboricole), mais ils doivent aller à terre, à quatre pattes, pour atteindre des arbres éloignés. Ils peuvent parcourir jusqu'à 10 km pour les atteindre. Leurs mains et leurs pieds ne sont pas adaptés à ce parcours terrestre et ne reposent pas à plat sur le sol à cause des longs doigts et des griffes incurvées. (voir Membres). Le pelvis et le bassin sont statiques, leur démarche est donc caractérisée par de nombreux mouvements latéraux. Les mouvements des membres sont peu coordonnés et secs.

Mére koala marchant sur un sol terreux avec son petit sur le dos qui s'agrippe à son cou
Les koalas marchent à quatre pattes quand ils sont au sol, ici avec le jeune sur le dos.

Quand ils sont au sol, ils avancent tout d'abord le membre supérieur droit, puis le membre inférieur gauche, ensuite le membre supérieur gauche et pour finir le membre inférieur droit. Lorsqu'ils courent, ils posent en même temps les membres supérieurs, puis les membres inférieurs.

Quand ils sont dans l'eau, ils sont d'excellents nageurs.

Quand les koalas veulent grimper à un arbre, ils sautent à partir du sol et plantent leurs griffes dans l'écorce. Ils s'agrippent de leurs deux bras et poussent vigoureusement avec leurs deux pattes pour aller vers le haut. Les koalas grimpent aux troncs et en descendent en ayant toujours la tête vers le haut. Après être grimpés dans l'arbre, la montée se fait généralement plus lentement en utilisant un bras, puis la patte opposée. Les griffes et les doigts opposables leur permettent de saisir les troncs et les branches facilement. La descente est normalement plus lente, seule une patte est déplacée à la fois.

Les mouvements sont généralement lents car ils participent à la stratégie de métabolisme lent développé par le koala pour s'approprier les eucalyptus. En l'occurrence, ils n'ont qu'un tiers de la masse musculaire de leurs cousins wombats plus rapides[21].

Régime alimentaire

Koala accroché d'une main à une branche verticale, saisissant de l'autre main une feuille à l'extrémité d'une branche horizontale, tout cela en mâchant des feuilles d'eucalyptus
Les koalas s'alimentent presque exclusivement de feuilles et d'écorce d'eucalyptus.

Les koalas se nourrissent presque exclusivement de feuilles et d'écorces ainsi que de fruits d'espèces bien précises d'eucalyptus. Ils sont parmi les seuls animaux avec les possums à queue en anneau (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) et les grands planeurs (Petauroides volans) à pouvoir manger de l'eucalyptus.

Choix des essences

Il est probable que cette adaptation évolutive ait eu lieu pour profiter d'une niche écologique non utilisée, car l'eucalyptus a développé une stratégie de défense extensive en se munissant de tanins, d'huiles et de lignine en abondance. Les feuilles d'eucalytus sont pauvres en protéines, riches en substances indigestes et contiennent des composés phénoliques et terpéniques toxiques pour la plupart des espèces. Des recherches menées sur les koalas par des gardiens de 13 parcs naturels de Nouvelle-Galles du Sud ont démontré que le feuillage d'eucalyptus préféré était celui avec le taux le plus faible de tanins condensés[31]. En général, de tels arbres poussent dans les zones fertiles, en particulier près des rivières.

Dans toute l'Australie, les koalas n'utilisent qu'environ 120 des plus de 800 espèces d'eucalyptus connues, tout en ayant localement des préférences marquées pour 5 à 10 espèces. Au sein d'une zone délimitée, en règle générale, les koalas n'utilisent pas plus de deux à trois espèces d'eucalyptus pour leur alimentation primaire. Ils utilisent aussi des espèces voisines de l'eucalyptus comme Corymbia, Angophora et Lophostemon, ainsi que de nombreuses autres espèces très différentes des eucalyptus (Acacia, Bombax, Leptospermum, Melaleuca, Pinus et Tristania, ), comme alimentation secondaire (quelques centièmes seulement de leur alimentation globale) ou pour d'autres utilisations telles que se détendre, dormir, etc. Mais ils préfèrent fondamentalement des variétés particulières d'eucalyptus, ces préférences variant d'une région à l'autre : dans le sud le gommier blanc, le gommier bleu, et le gommier des marais (Swamp gum (en)) sont favorisés ; le gommier gris, le gommier rouge des forêts et le tallowood sont importants dans le nord, tandis que le gommier rouge omniprésent dans les marais et cours d'eau isolés et saisonniers qui serpentent sur la plaine aride de l'intérieur permet au koala de vivre dans des zones étonnamment arides. Beaucoup de facteurs déterminent le choix parmi les 800 espèces d'eucalyptus, le plus important étant la concentration d'un groupe de toxines phénoliques appelé composés de phloroglucinol formylé.

Les variations saisonnières de consommation de différentes feuilles d'arbres pourraient d'ailleurs s'expliquer par des taux plus ou moins élevés de leurs composants. La concentration en eau joue aussi un rôle important et dans une moindre mesure, la taille des arbres, permettant d'y rester plus longtemps pour s'alimenter, ainsi que des niveaux d'azote élevés préférés par les koalas. Les meilleurs arbres à koalas poussent sur les terrains fertiles, des zones convoitées par l'agriculture. Pour combler le déficit en substances minérales dans le corps, les koalas ingèrent occasionnellement de la terre.

Prise de nourriture

Les koalas passent environ trois à cinq heures par jour à manger activement. La prise de nourriture peut se faire à n'importe quel moment, mais se passe généralement la nuit entre 17h et minuit. Les koalas se nourrissent par intermittence par sessions de 20 minutes environ. Un koala adulte nécessite par jour environ 200 à 400 grammes de feuilles en moyenne, les plus gros spécimens pouvant en ingurgiter jusqu'à 1,1 kg. Quand elles allaitent, les femelles augmentent leur consommation de 20 à 25 %. Au moment de se nourrir, les koalas sont contraints d'être extrêmement sélectifs, car l'eucalyptus contient des substances toxiques, que les koalas peuvent tolérer dans une certaine mesure, mais à forte concentration, elles leur sont tout aussi toxiques.

Ils étendent tout d'abord leurs bras et cueillent avec grande précaution une feuille bien choisie, de préférence les feuilles les plus vieilles, où les toxines ne sont plus aussi concentrées. Ils la reniflent avec insistance, avant d'en croquer un morceau. Les feuilles sont alors broyées et mâchées consciencieusement à l'aide des dents, du diastème, de la langue et des abajoues, qui permettent de stocker de grandes quantités de feuilles, jusqu'à former une bouillie puis avalées. (Voir denture ci-dessus) Les koalas boivent extrêmement rarement. Ils couvrent leurs besoins en eau principalement par les feuilles d'eucalyptus, riches en eau. La rosée et les gouttes de pluie sont de moindre importance. Pendant la sécheresse, ils vont néanmoins malgré les dangers jusqu'aux points d'eau. À ce sujet, l'on attribue souvent le mot « koala » à une langue aborigène dans laquelle il signifierait « qui ne boit pas », « sans eau » ou « sans boire », mais l'origine du nom est en fait encore inconnue et à l'étude. (Voir aussi les sections « Étymologie et dénominations » et « Aborigènes ».) Les koalas mangent occasionnellement les pousses tendres, les fleurs et l'écorce des eucalyptus.

Les dents du koala sont bien adaptées à son alimentation en eucalyptus. Les animaux cueillent les feuilles avec les incisives inférieures et supérieures. Le diastème, l'espace entre les incisives et les molaires, permet de déplacer la masse de feuilles avec la langue sans se mordre. Les molaires sont formées de telle façon qu'elles coupent et déchirent les feuilles en plus de les écraser. C'est ainsi que les dents extirpent l'humidité des feuilles et en détruisent la paroi cellulaire, ce qui facilite la digestion. Les sujets les plus âgés peuvent souffrir de malnutrition à cause de l'usure des dents. Ils doivent consommer jusqu'à 40 % plus de feuilles et mastiquer pendant beaucoup plus longtemps que les jeunes aux dents aiguisées. La mort par famine est un phénomène récurrent[21].

Koala en train de dormir roulé en boule, les fesses engoncées dans la fourche d'un eucalyptus
Les koalas ont un métabolisme lent et dorment presque toute la journée.

Digestion

Les koalas sont un bon exemple d'un mammifère capable de vaincre les défenses d'une plante. Les feuilles d'eucalyptus sont riches en fibres indigestes, riches en toxines et pauvres en nutriments. Certaines toxines sont filtrées et éliminées par le foie, grâce au niveau élevé de cytochrome P450 qu'ils y produisent[32],[33]. L'estomac possède une glande cardiogastrique, qui augmente la production d'acide et d'enzymes. Seuls les wombats possèdent aussi cette glande chez les marsupiaux[21]. L'estomac est petit par rapport aux intestins. Enfin, les koalas ont développé un mode de digestion symbiotique grâce à la présence dans leur tube digestif d'un microbiote intestinal spécifique[34] (bactéries Streptococcus gallolyticus (en), Lonepinella koalarum) capables de dégrader et détoxifier les complexes tanins-protéines[35].

On spécule que c'est la production de cytochrome P450 qui entrave l'efficacité de l'antibiotique chloramphénicol dans le koala, qu'on y utilise pour traiter les Chlamydia, et en même temps, que donner du chloramphénicol y désactive cette cytochrome[32] (voir aussi maladies et pathologies).

Les grosses particules de nourriture passent par le côlon et sont évacuées rapidement. Au cours d'un processus de digestion relativement long, permis par un métabolisme lent, les petites particules subissent une fermentation microbienne dans le cæcum, qui avec près de 2,5 m, est le plus long de tous les mammifères par rapport à la taille du corps. Les bactéries présentes aident ainsi à détruire les parois cellulaires. Tous les nutriments utilisables, glucides, lipides et protides ainsi que l'eau nécessaires au koala sont extraits pendant la digestion. Comme cet apport énergétique est très faible, un métabolisme très lent, de deux fois inférieur à la plupart des mammifères (wombats et paresseux mis à part), permet de garder l'eucalyptus pendant une assez longue période dans le système digestif, pendant laquelle le maximum d'énergie en est tiré. Ce métabolisme lent permet parallèlement une utilisation moindre d'énergie, plus faible que chez les autres herbivores[36].

Le koala joue d'ailleurs le même rôle écologique que le paresseux. Les koalas défèquent environ 150 fois par jour. Ils produisent des fèces sèches en forme de boulettes, l'eau étant conservée par l'animal car il ne boit que rarement dans la nature.

Reproduction et développement

Parade, accouplement et fécondation

Pendant la saison des amours, qui dure pendant l'été austral entre décembre et mars, les koalas sont plus actifs que d'habitude. Pendant cette période, les koalas mâles lancent de forts aboiements enroués. Ces cris servent à marquer le territoire, mais aussi à informer les femelles prêtes à se reproduire. Chez les koalas, ce sont principalement les femelles qui déterminent le moment de l'accouplement. La plupart du temps, la femelle koala s'occupe encore du jeune de l'année précédente. L'éducation d'un nouveau bébé koala ne peut cependant avoir lieu que lorsque le jeune précédent est sevré.

Cela dure habituellement environ 12 mois. Il se peut donc que la période de reproduction, selon la région, s'étende d'octobre à avril. Les jeunes presque adultes sont souvent chassés du territoire de leur mère à cette période pour qu'ils fondent leur propre territoire.
De multiples territoires mâles chevauchent de multiples territoires femelles.

Ces territoires sont plus ou moins flexibles, ce qui engendre des compétitions entre mâles pour occuper l'espace. Les mâles deviennent très agressifs pendant la période de reproduction et se blessent souvent mutuellement de leurs griffes acérées. Le koala étant polygame, les mâles dominants s'accouplent pendant la saison avec toutes les femelles à proximité (en général, ils se constituent un harem de 2 à 5 femelles), ce qui s'accompagne souvent de griffures et de morsures. L'accouplement dure de 30 secondes à 2 minutes. L'accouplement se fait parfois très violemment.

Quelquefois les mâles ne sont pas toujours en mesure de détecter l'œstrus d'une femelle et s'accoupleront n'importe quand pendant la saison. Si la femelle n'est pas pleinement consentante, elle résistera en essayant de s'enfuir et en lançant des cris de défense. Le mâle peut alors abandonner l'arbre de la femelle, ou essayer de s'accoupler en s'agrippant à sa nuque avec ses dents. Il n'est cependant pas établi si seuls les mâles partent à la recherche des femelles ou inversement. Il est possible que cela dépende du statut de l'individu dans la hiérarchie sociale.

Il arrive ainsi qu'une femelle en chaleur se mette en quête d'un mâle dominant. Celui-ci doit conserver sa position vis-à-vis des autres mâles et garder un œil sur leurs femelles. Le mâle dominant chasse en général les mâles subordonnés qui essaient aussi de s'accoupler avec les femelles à proximité[21]. S'ils réussissent, le mâle dominant s'accouple aussi et noie de sa semence le sperme de son rival afin d'augmenter ses chances de reproduction. L'accouplement se passe sur l'arbre (eucalyptus le plus souvent).

Reproduction

Les koalas deviennent matures vers deux ou trois ans. Les accouplements fructueux ont lieu néanmoins la plupart du temps un à deux ans plus tard. Habituellement, les femelles se reproduisent pour la première fois plus tôt, car les mâles dominants écartent les jeunes de toutes pratiques. Une femelle en bonne santé peut donner naissance à un jeune tous les ans pendant 12 ans. L'intervalle entre les naissances étant d'un à deux ans généralement. Les femelles ont une ovulation réflexe contrairement à beaucoup de marsupiaux. L'accouplement a lieu au printemps austral, entre octobre et novembre. Les femelles sont polyoestriennes, c'est-à-dire qu'elles auront plusieurs cycles d'œstrus pendant la période de reproduction. Chaque cycle oestrien dure en moyenne 30 jours[37].

Le cycle reproductif des koalas est similaire à ceux des mammifères placentaires. Leur taux de natalité est bas. Ils s'occupent pendant longtemps de leurs jeunes dépendants. De longs intervalles peuvent subvenir entre les naissances. De plus, les femelles investissent considérablement d'efforts pour la croissance du bébé, qu'il soit mâle ou femelle[21].

Gestation

Fœtus de koala, de couleur marron, juste avant la naissance
Fœtus de koala juste avant la naissance, conservé à l'hôpital pour koalas de Port Macquarie.
Koala avec un jeune dans la poche.

La gestation dure environ 35 jours.

Cycle de vie

Naissance

À la naissance, le nouveau-né rampe seul du cloaque vers la poche, à moins que la mère ne s'en saisisse et le mette dans la poche. Il pèse alors moins d'un gramme et mesure de 1,5 à 1,8 cm de long (la taille d'un haricot), est aveugle, nu et sous-développé. Il est fort comparable à un embryon. En revanche, les griffes et les avant-membres sont développés ce qui l'aide à ramper dans la poche sans l'aide de sa mère. Les sens du toucher et de l'odorat sont déjà développés[21]. Dans la poche, un sphincter puissant empêche le bébé complètement enveloppé de tomber. D'ordinaire, un seul bébé nait en été et poursuit sa maturation et son allaitement pendant six à sept mois dans la poche. (Les jumeaux sont très rares, les premiers vrais jumeaux nés en captivité, nommés « Euca » et « Lyptus », sont ceux de l'Université du Queensland en 1999[38],[39]) Une particularité des phascolarctidés, partagée avec les vombatidés, est d'alimenter l'embryon pendant la première partie de sa vie par un placenta choroallantoïdien. Dans toute l'Australie, les naissances de koalas ont lieu tous les mois de l'année.

Au Queensland, 60 % des naissances se passent entre décembre et mars, tous sexes confondus. En Australie méridionale, la moitié des mâles naissent en novembre et la moitié des femelles ne sont pas nées avant décembre. Il y a plus de naissance de mâles que de femelles dans certaines régions du sud de l'Australie, sans que l'on puisse avancer une hypothèse[21].

À treize semaines, le nourrisson pèse 50 g[37].

Petite enfance (

Après environ 22 semaines, il ouvre les yeux et commence à regarder hors de la poche. Il est alors appelé un « joey » en Australie, surnom générique donné à tous les bébés marsupiaux. Entre 22 et 30 semaines, il reçoit une nourriture supplémentaire, appelée « bouillie » que sa mère produit en sus du lait. La « bouillie » est une forme spécifique d'excrément, consistant en une matière molle de feuilles partiellement digérées[37], qui facilite le passage du jeune du lait aux feuilles, en lui faisant acquérir les bactéries nécessaires à la digestion des feuilles d'eucalyptus[40], une étape décisive. Elle devient peu à peu l'alimentation principale du jeune, qui, avec une taille croissante, quitte de plus en plus la poche et qui s'allonge sur le ventre de la mère pour manger.

C'est à ce moment qu'il apprend à saisir les feuilles de ses mains et à les renifler précautionneusement avant de les manger. Cependant, le jeune tète encore le lait de sa mère jusqu'à l'âge d'un an. Comme le jeune est plus grand, les tétons de la mère s'allongent tellement qu'ils pendent de l'ouverture de la poche.

Les femelles adoptent quelquefois des bébés orphelins[21].

Stade juvénile / Adolescence

Avec le début de l'alimentation feuillée, vers 7 ou 8 mois, les jeunes grandissent bien plus vite et leur corpulence devient trapue. Désormais le jeune est transporté sur le dos de sa mère, tout en cherchant encore refuge dans la poche de sa mère. Devenu plus grand, il fait ses premières escapades à proximité de la mère.

Jeune faisant la moitié de la taille de sa mère, s'agrippant à elle dans son dos. Les deux sont dans une fourche d'eucalyptus
Koala avec un jeune sur le dos.

Après environ 12 mois, le jeune est suffisamment indépendant pour que la mère puisse de nouveau entrer en gestation. Si elle a un autre rejeton, la mère ne laisse plus téter le jeune de l'année précédente, ni aller sur son dos. Elle le tolère encore à proximité jusqu'à ce que le cadet fasse ses premières escapades. Normalement, les jeunes d'environ 18 mois sont expulsés par la mère. Néanmoins, si la mère n'attend pas de grossesse, le jeune peut encore jouir de la protection maternelle jusqu'à encore trois ans. Après son expulsion, il part fonder son propre territoire. À noter que les koalas sont dépendants de leur mère pendant une longue période comparativement aux autres marsupiaux.

Séparation et expansion

Les jeunes koalas sont contraints quelque temps après le sevrage de quitter le territoire de leur mère, ce qui arrive habituellement à l'âge de 18 mois. Comme toutes les femelles ne se reproduisent pas tous les ans, cela peut aussi survenir après deux ou trois ans. Les koalas en errance cherchent un habitat soit inoccupé soit à proximité d'autres koalas. Les femelles ont tendance à s'installer à proximité, tandis que les mâles partent souvent plus loin[21].

Les koalas en mal de territoire sont quelquefois obligés de parcourir de grandes distances pour trouver un endroit adapté. Ces déplacements permettent un échange génétique entre les groupes reproducteurs et permet ainsi d'assurer la diversité génétique des populations.

La séparation et l'expansion sont de nos jours empêchées dans de nombreuses zones peuplées de koalas par l'intervention humaine. Les espaces vitaux disponibles sont souvent réduits ou parcellisés ; les jeunes koalas ne trouvent alors aucun territoire approprié. Soit ils en perdent la vie, soit ils doivent errer sans arrêt. Cela peut cependant entraîner une sur-utilisation des capacités alimentaires, une disparition des arbres ou un recul de la population.

Stade adulte

La maturité sexuelle des femelles arrive lorsqu'elles ont 2 ou 3 ans. Elles pèsent alors environ 6 kg. Les mâles sont murs à 2 ans, mais leurs chances d'accouplement sont basses jusqu'à l'âge de 4 ou 5 ans. Leur glande pectorale se développe entre un an et demi et 3 ans[21].

Longévité

De 13 à 18 ans[41], les informations disponibles sur son espérance de vie dans la nature sont peu fiables, on estime que les femelles ont en moyenne une espérance de vie de 15 ans, tandis que les mâles atteignent en moyenne les 10 ans, car ils se blessent plus pendant les combats, se déplacent normalement plus loin et habitent dans des habitats médiocres. Les koalas sauvages vivent généralement moins longtemps qu'en captivité (mâles, 18 ans[42], femelles jusqu'à 19 ans). L'espérance de vie des koalas vivant dans les banlieues ou près d'une autoroute est particulièrement courte. Elle se situe en ce cas à deux ou trois ans pour un mâle.

Mortalité

Leurs ennemis naturels sont les dingos, une grande chouette d'1,40 m d'envergure appelée ninoxe puissante (Ninox strenua), les aigles d'Australie (Aquila audax), les varans, les pythons et l'homme. De plus, les sécheresses et surtout les feux de forêts peuvent leur être dangereux[21]. Les implantations humaines engendrent des sources supplémentaires de dangers, telles que les automobiles, les chiens errants, un risque d'incendie plus grand (on peut penser aux incendies de 2019 en Australie), les insecticides, les maladies (dues entre autres au stress) et les piscines.

Maladies et pathologies

La fréquence d'apparition des maladies est un indicateur de bonne nutrition et de stress des populations[43]. Dans un espace vital viable, l'incidence de koalas malades est faible et ne pose pas de problème de survie à la communauté. La diversité génétique localement insuffisante peut cependant augmenter la fréquence de certaines maladies. Dans ce cas, la communauté devient très vulnérable aux maladies[43].

Alors que dans la nature, leurs prédateurs sont presque inexistants, les koalas ont un mauvais système immunitaire et sont souvent malades: cystite, périostite crânienne, conjonctivite, sinusite, maladies urogénitales, maladies respiratoires et intestinales, ulcères, cancer de la peau, déshydratation et déperdition musculaire. Leur maladie la plus courante, la sinusite peut évoluer en pneumonie, surtout pendant la saison froide. Les épizooties de sinusite ont durement touché les populations de koalas entre 1887 et 1889 et entre 1900 et 1903. Les koalas sont particulièrement sensibles au stress lié à leur espace vital et au stress corporel. Le koala peut alors se mettre à remuer les oreilles et un hoquet peut même se faire entendre. À cause de la grande activité et du stress de la période de reproduction, ils deviennent particulièrement sujets aux maladies. Les koalas très malades peuvent être détectés avec une fourrure mouillée après une averse, car ils n'ont plus assez d'énergie pour l'entretenir régulièrement, l'effet de perlé disparaît alors. Souvent, ils ont aussi des tiques en quantité inhabituelle. De nouvelles tiques, provenant du Japon et d'Indonésie, ont d'ailleurs été introduites accidentellement par l'homme, ainsi que de nouvelles maladies transmissibles aux koalas. Chez les vieux koalas, cela peut être aussi le résultat de l'usure des dents, car ils ne peuvent plus mâcher les feuilles et doivent par conséquent mourir de faim.

Symptômes présentés par un koala malade[44] :

  • yeux rouges ou larmoyants ;
  • bave coulant de la gueule ;
  • fourrure à l'aspect mouillé ou collé ;
  • ralentissement de l'activité ;
  • maintien sur le même arbre pendant plusieurs jours ;
  • station assise au sol ou dans les branches basses de l'arbre sans fuite si quelque chose approche ;
  • quatre membres non utilisés dans leur totalité quand il grimpe aux arbres ;
  • gonflement autour des oreilles ;
  • perte de poids brusque.

Chlamydiose

Très souvent apparaissent des infections de Chlamydia. Elles se transmettent sexuellement et se répandent facilement. Celles-ci peuvent rendre les femelles stériles, ce qui pourrait avoir de graves conséquences sur la survie de l'espèce. Des populations du Victoria ont été contaminées par des transferts de l'île Phillip. On estime aussi que 70 à 90 % des populations sauvages du Queensland et du Victoria sont atteintes. Malgré cette incidence très élevée, seulement 5 % des populations présentent des symptômes de la maladie. Il existe deux syndromes principaux associés à la chlamydiose :

  • l'inflammation de la vessie ou cystite, qui peut entraîner une fertilité réduite, des pertes urinaires et infection des voies urinaires (causée par Chlamydophila pecorum) ;
  • infections oculaires qui peuvent entraîner une baisse de la vision et un risque accru de prédation par les chiens[21].

Pour certaines communautés isolées, particulièrement sur l'île Raymond (en), l'île du Serpent et dans le Parc national du Mont Eccles (en), les populations, bien que positives aux Chlamydia, ont tellement prospéré qu'elles posent un problème environnemental en termes de surconsommation des ressources[43].

On spécule que c'est la production de cytochrome P450, qui se passe dans le foie pour que le koala puisse digérer les toxines de la feuille d'eucalyptus, qui entrave l'efficacité de l'antibiotique chloramphénicol dans le koala, qu'on y utilise pour traiter les Chlamydia[32].

Rétrovirus

Le génome du koala contient un rétrovirus (KoRV) qui est assez similaire au virus responsable de la leucémie du gibbon. Le koala peut être infecté soit par transmission génétique, soit par exposition à des espèces mammifères infectées. Il existe de fait une très forte incidence de leucémie et de lymphome chez les koalas. On estime que 3 à 5 % des populations sauvages sont touchés. Chez les koalas en captivité, 60 % des individus le sont. Comme les koalas sont aussi touchés par la chlamydiose, qui est communément associée à dépression immunitaire dans beaucoup d'autres espèces, les scientifiques pensent qu'un lien existe entre le rétrovirus et la leucémie, le lymphome et la chlamydiose du koala. Un lien similaire existe dans le virus de la leucémie du chat. Le rétrovirus du koala (KoRV) pourrait avoir été transmis aux koalas par les rats. Le rétrovirus n'est certainement entré dans le génome des koalas que pendant les cent dernières années.

Même si les populations du nord sont le plus durement touchées, toutes les populations ne sont pas encore touchées. Les populations du sud sont les moins affectées. Mais la progression du rétrovirus continue[21]. Il n'existe aucun moyen de prévention, ni de guérison[43].

Parasites

  • Mite de la fourrure du koala

Comme la plupart des mammifères, le koala possède sa mite spécifique, Koalachirus perkinsi (Domrow), qui vit en ectoparasitisme sur la surface de son corps, mais aussi dans les conduits des glandes exogènes et le système digestif. Elles se nourrissent majoritairement de graisses et substances huileuses[45],[46]. On la suspecte de jouer un rôle dans la transmission de la chlamydiose[21]

Étymologie et dénominations

Le mot koala vient du darug, une langue aborigène éteinte de la région de Sydney, gula ou gulawany. Bien que la voyelle /u/ ait été transcrite à l'origine en écriture latine comme « oo », conformément aux règles de transcription anglaises (dans des orthographes telles que coola ou koolah), ce qui aurait donné coula en français, elle s'est ensuite modifiée en « oa » vraisemblablement à cause d'une erreur[47]. On indique quelquefois à tort que le mot signifierait « ne boit pas »[48], d'autres fois « amer »[49] D'autres noms aborigènes pour l'animal sont : kallwein, kuhlewong, kolo, kola, kuhla, kaola, karbor, burabie et goribun.

Le mot n'apparaît dans le Dictionnaire de l'Académie française qu'au XXe siècle dans la 9e édition (1992-…)[50].

Bien que le koala ne soit pas un ours, les colons anglophones de la fin du XVIIIe siècle, l'ont tout d'abord appelé koala bear à cause de sa grande ressemblance morphologique avec les ours. Ce nom de koala bear, bien que taxinomiquement incorrect, est toujours utilisé dans certains pays hors d'Australie[51], ce qui n'est pas recommandé à cause de l'inexactitude du terme[52],[53],[54],[55],[56]. Il existe d'autres noms anglais descriptifs tout aussi incorrects basés sur bear comme monkey bear (ours-singe), native bear (ours indigène) et tree bear (ours arboricole)[57]. Il fut un temps où l'on trouvait aussi en français ours d'Australie[10].

dessin de Cuvier de 1817 tentant de représenter un koala. La posture est celle d'un lynx
Le koala par Cuvier en 1817.

Cette comparaison erronée avec les ours lui a valu en 1816 le nom scientifique du genre, forgé par le zoologue et anatomiste Henri-Marie Ducrotay de Blainville, Phascolarctos (Φασκολάρκτος), terme dérivé du grec ϕάσκωλος (phaskolos) « poche, outre » et ἄρκτος (arktos) « ours ». Tandis qu'en 1817 le zoologue Goldfuss lui donne sur simple base de la gravure de Georges Cuvier[58] son nom d'espèce, cinereus, signifiant en latin « cendré »[59], tout en nommant son genre Lipurus. Les deux dénominations du genre sont en concurrence jusqu'en 1840, date à laquelle Phascolarctos cinereus est adopté définitivement.

Le koala a aussi été comparé au paresseux, ce qui lui a valu son nom de « paresseux australien », tout aussi impropre qu'« ours ». À l'époque, le paresseux était considéré comme un animal extrêmement stupide et le koala fut dédaigné par les zoologues britanniques jusqu'à ce que Blainville s'y intéresse lors d'un voyage à Londres.

À l'heure actuelle, en français, il est simplement appelé « koala »[60],[61], puisque c'est la dernière espèce vivante du genre Phascolarctos.

Systématique

Phylogénie

Les koalas appartiennent à l'ordre des mammifères marsupiaux des diprotodontés, c'est-à-dire qu'ils ont deux incisives inférieures pointant vers l'avant. Ils sont du sous-ordre des vombatiformes qui comprend notamment les wombats (voir aussi systématique des diprotodontés). Les origines des koalas ne sont pas clairement établies, même s'il est presque certain qu'ils descendent d'animaux terrestres semblables aux wombats. Ils ont commencé à diverger il y a 42 millions d'années, à la fin de l'Éocène. La poche des koalas orientée vers l'arrière et le bas est d'ailleurs un héritage des wombats creuseurs de terriers. Alors que ceux-ci sont restés au sol, les koalas ont adopté un mode de vie arboricole, à l'instar des dendrolagues qui ont divergé de leurs ancêtres terrestres pour résider dans les arbres[21].

Histoire évolutive

Les koalas sont les uniques représentants restant de la famille des phascolarctidés.

Les premiers fossiles connus de la famille des koalas ont été découverts en Australie septentrionale et ont été datés de l'Oligocène, de 20 à 25 Ma c'est-à-dire plus précisément durant le chattien[62]. Ils sont cependant rares et on ne trouve souvent que des dents et des os isolés[63].

Une explication de la rareté inhabituelle de ces fossiles serait que les premiers koalas étaient eux-mêmes rares. Il est vraisemblable qu'ils se soient spécialisés dans la consommation des feuilles des ancêtres des eucalyptus actuels, qui n'étaient que faiblement représentés dans l'ancienne forêt humide australienne. Les fossiles du koala actuel (Phascolarctos cinereus) remontent au maximum à 1,81 MA, c'est-à-dire au Pléistocène[64]. La glaciation de Würm et la dérive progressive du continent vers l'équateur entrainent un assèchement de la région. L'eucalyptus a pu ainsi s'étendre jusqu'à dominer de plus en plus les régions de forêts claires d'Australie. Les koalas se sont adaptés à ces nouvelles conditions de sècheresse. On suppose que les eucalyptus et les koalas se sont développés conjointement pendant des milliers d'années et que les koalas de l'époque des Aborigènes étaient plus nombreux et plus largement répartis que leurs ancêtres. Des fossiles montrent que les koalas étaient présents en Australie-Occidentale au Quaternaire.

Au Miocène et au Paléocène, on trouvait de nombreuses espèces de koalas ou animaux similaires dans toute l'Australie. Les 18 représentants des quatre autres genres (Perikoala, Madakoala, Koobor, Litokoala) étaient vraisemblablement aussi des mangeurs de feuillage, qui ne se différenciaient guère du koala d'aujourd'hui. Au Pliocène, Phascolarctos stirtoni, ou Koala géant, était deux fois plus gros que le koala actuel[21]. Il y a plus de 50 000 ans, il existait un koala géant du genre Koalemus qui habitait les régions méridionales d'Australie (Queensland e.a.[Quoi ?]).

Sous-espèces

Koala avec des longs poils surtout sur les oreilles, enserrant un eucalyptus
Un koala méridional sur l'Île Kangourou, non indigène sur cette île.

Les études du génome mitochondrial[65] montrent qu'il n'y a pas assez de différenciation pour soutenir l'existence de sous-espèces[66]. Traditionnellement, trois sous-espèces de koalas sont différenciées d'un point de vue morphologique. Ce sont cependant des choix arbitraires à partir d'une cline et ils ne sont pas généralement acceptés. La distinction suit d'ailleurs les frontières des États. En fait, le passage d'une forme à une autre est continu et il existe des différences substantielles entre individus d'une même région telles que la couleur du pelage ou autres. Selon la règle de Bergmann, les individus du sud, au climat plus frais, sont aussi plus grands.

La sous-espèce de la région du fleuve Nepean en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, le koala de New South Wales (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus)[61] est de taille moyenne. Ce koala possède une fourrure relativement épaisse, qui semble être un mélange de gris en raison des pointes gris cendré. Son poids habituel varie de 15 kg pour les mâles à 8,5 kg pour les femelles.

La sous-espèce septentrionale, le koala de Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus)[61], a été décrite en 1923 sur la base d'un exemplaire du Queensland. Elle est nettement plus petite (environ 6,5 kg pour le mâle et 5 kg pour la femelle) et possède une fourrure argentée, presque gris sale, beaucoup plus courte et moins épaisse.

La sous-espèce méridionale, le koala de Victoria ou koala victorien (Phascolarctos cinereus victor)[61],[67], est par contre nettement plus grande. Elle est caractérisée par une fourrure plus longue et plus épaisse, d'un gris plus foncé, plus chatoyant, presque cannelle, aux accents chocolat sur le dos et les avant-bras. Elle a une face ventrale claire plus proéminente et des touffes d'oreilles d'un blanc laineux[68].

Le koala et les hommes

Les relations entre les hommes et les koalas ont subi de grandes variations au fil du temps. Les peuples premiers n'y attachaient ni plus ni moins d'importance qu'aux autres animaux de leur environnement. Les premiers colons en Australie le considéraient comme une curiosité et commencèrent à le chasser pour sa fourrure. De nos jours, il est reconnu internationalement comme le symbole de l'Australie et fait l'objet de mesures de protection renforcées.

Les Aborigènes et le Temps du rêve

Les Aborigènes chassaient les koalas pour leur viande et leur fourrure, mais sans le préférer à d'autres animaux. La culture aborigène implique des pratiques de chasse durables, ce qui n'a jamais mis en danger les populations de koalas. De nombreuses légendes du Temps du rêve sont transmises oralement sur le koala, qui expliquent ses particularités corporelles. Il fut souvent utilisé comme symbole de totem. Celui qui le prenait comme totem ne devait plus le tuer. Le koala est considéré comme faisant partie de la création du Temps du rêve.

Koobor le Koala

 src=
Phascolarctos cinereus (Koala) au ZooParc de Beauval à Saint-Aignan-sur-Cher, France.

Il était une fois au Temps du rêve, un orphelin nommé Koobor constamment maltraité et négligé par son clan. La région était très sèche et chaque soir, tout le monde buvait avant lui et il ne lui restait jamais assez d'eau pour assouvir sa soif. Il dut alors apprendre à vivre en mangeant les feuilles pleines d'eau du gommier, mais ce n'était jamais suffisant. Un matin, quand le clan partit chercher de la nourriture, ils oublièrent de cacher les seaux d'eaux et pour la première fois dans sa vie, Koobor eût assez d'eau à boire. Il s'en remplit la panse qui était prête à éclater. Une fois, sa soif assouvie, il se rendit compte que son clan serait fort fâché quand il rentrerait. il décida alors de rassembler tous les seaux d'eau et les suspendit à une branche basse pour les cacher. Il grimpa ensuite dans les branches et entonna un chant merveilleux qui fit tellement pousser l'arbre qu'il en devint le plus haut de la forêt.

Le soir, quand les gens du clan de Koobor regagnèrent le village, ils étaient fourbus et assoiffés et devinrent bientôt fort en colère quand ils virent leurs seaux d'eau pendus au plus grand arbre où était Koobor. Ils lui demandèrent de rendre les seaux volés, mais celui-ci refusa et leur dit : "À votre tour d'avoir soif !". Cela les mit dans une colère noire. Plusieurs hommes grimpèrent à l'arbre, mais Koobor les faisait tomber en leur lançant les seaux. Deux sorciers plus fûtés arrivèrent tout de même jusqu'en haut et battirent Koobor à plate couture et lancèrent son petit corps brisé qui s'écrasa par terre.

Alors que tous regardaient, ils virent le corps brisé se métamorphoser en koala et grimper à l'arbre tout proche. Il s'assit alors au plus haut des branches et commença à mâcher des feuilles de gommier. Koobor leur dit alors :" Vous pouvez me tuer pour me manger, mais ma peau ne peut être ni dépecée, ni mes os brisés avant que je ne sois cuit. Si quelqu'un ose désobéir, mon esprit assèchera tous les lacs et toutes les rivières, si bien que tout le monde en mourra, et il en sera ainsi de tous les koalas !".

Voilà pourquoi les koalas n'ont pas besoin d'eau pour rester en vie et pourquoi les aborigènes respectent toujours l'ordre de Koobor lorsqu'ils font cuire un koala, car ils ont peur qu'ils ne reviennent et ne leur prenne toute leur eau, les laissant assoiffés pour toujours[69].

Curiosité scientifique des premiers Européens

Dessin d'une mère koala sur une branche d'eucalyptus avec son enfant sur le dos
Représentation de 1863 du koala par Gould.

Le koala était resté inaperçu lors de l'expédition de James Cook en 1770. La première mention de son existence figure dans le rapport de John Price, qui, sous les ordres du gouverneur de Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, entreprend une exploration des Montagnes bleues et décrit « un animal appelé cullawine qui ressemble à un paresseux »[70]. En 1802, l'explorateur Francis Barrallier envoie des pattes conservées dans de l'alcool au gouverneur. En 1803, des Aborigènes en apportent des exemplaires vivants au Lieutenant-gouverneur de la colonie à Port Jackson[49] et quelques mois plus tard, le Sydney Gazette en fait une description détaillée[70]. L'animal reçoit son nom scientifique seulement en 1816 (Voir "Étymologie et dénominations" ci-dessus). En 1855, un demi-siècle après sa localisation en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, le naturaliste Wilhelm von Blandowski le trouve en Australie-Méridionale et en 1923, O. Thomas le localise dans le sud-est du Queensland. Les populations d'Australie-Méridionale ont été complètement anéanties par les Européens au début du XXe siècle.

Intérêt économique des fourrures

Peau de Koala étalée
Peau de Koala provenant de la collection de l'ancienne École supérieure de la fourrure de Francfort.

Si les premiers Européens considéraient les koalas comme une curiosité du continent australien, la situation commence à changer à partir de 1788. Les Européens prennent rapidement connaissance de la facilité avec laquelle les Aborigènes attrapent les koalas, qui font naturellement confiance à l'homme. Des centaines de milliers de koalas sont tués pour fournir la demande de fourrure de koala, un article recherché sur le marché mondial (Europe et États-Unis principalement), mais aussi en Australie, où l'on en confectionnait des couvertures de « voiture » très en vogue (15 koalas pour une couverture)[10]. Les fourrures de koalas avaient en effet la réputation d'être douces et résistantes.

 src=
Un camion chargé d'une cargaison de 3 600 fourrures de koalas, chassés durant la dernière saison de trappe au Queensland, en 1927.

Entre 1907 et 1927, six saisons de chasse au koala ont été décrétées par le gouvernement australien. Des prélèvements d'envergure ont eu lieu au Queensland en 1915, 1917 et surtout en 1919, quand le gouvernement décide l'ouverture d'une saison de chasse de six mois pour les koalas et les dendrolagues, pendant laquelle un million de koalas sont tués[71]. Cette exécution de masse entraîne cependant des protestations publiques et la même année, une interdiction de leur chasse. Néanmoins, le koala continue d'être chassé en toute illégalité. En 1924, ils disparaissent d'Australie-Méridionale, sont décimés en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, leur population tombe à 500 au Victoria. Cette même année, 2 millions de fourrures sont exportées de ces États. Le commerce de la fourrure se déplace ensuite vers le Queensland.

En août 1927, le gouvernement du Queensland en mal d'électeurs, alors que la sécheresse de 1926–28 engendrait une vague de pauvreté, rouvre officiellement la chasse aux koalas. 600 000 à 800 000 koalas sont massacrés en un mois de chasse[72], ce qui provoque un soulèvement colossal de l'opinion publique. Cela a certainement été le premier problème environnemental à grande échelle qui ait rassemblé les Australiens[73]. Cette volonté désormais affichée de protéger le koala ouvre la voie à la mise en place de mesures de protection à la fin des années 1930. Mais à cette époque, jusqu'à 80 % de leurs espaces vitaux antérieurs sont déjà détruits. En 1937, le koala est déclaré espèce protégée dans toute l'Australie.

Intérêt économique du tourisme

L'importance commerciale des koalas est tout aussi importante de nos jours, même si elle adopte une autre forme. Les koalas sont devenus des ambassadeurs du tourisme australien. Ils sont un atout touristique tellement fort, surtout pour l'énorme marché japonais, que des tentatives par certains États fédérés d'interdiction de prendre les koalas dans les bras pour cause de stress engendré aux animaux, ont rencontré l'opposition (vaine) des autorités touristiques.

Quand les populations sont en bonne santé, les koalas sauvages sont facilement observables, mais la plupart des touristes voient les koalas dans des zoos et des réserves, où il est permis de caresser, à défaut de prendre dans les bras[37].

En 2014, le koala représentait 3,2 milliards de dollars de revenus touristiques[74].

Perception actuelle

deux jeunes femmes souriant en caressant un koala dans une réserve
L'opinion publique australienne et internationale est très favorable au koala.

Alors que le koala au début de la colonisation de l'Australie n'était considéré que comme un porteur de fourrure, il est devenu au début du XXe siècle, à l'époque des nationalismes, le symbole reconnu de ce pays. En quelques années, des personnages koalas sont apparus tels que Blinky Bill et Bunyip Bluegum (en). Ils étaient pourvus de caractéristiques humaines et n'avaient que peu de respect pour les principes moraux bien tranchés. Le koala était aussi décrit comme d'un caractère libéré et amusant. Des personnages comme Blinky Bill devaient pointer du doigt les faiblesses et les contradictions de chaque individu. Le koala fait depuis office de personnification du caractère australien. De nombreux dessins et caricatures de koalas ont servi à représenter des traits de caractère répandus tels que la gloire nationale, l'hymne à la maternité, l'humilité et la fierté. De nos jours, le koala est un animal qui a toujours un grand impact sur l'opinion publique ; c'est un symbole des efforts de protection de la flore et de la faune australiennes. Grâce à son aspect mignon, il jouit d'une forte popularité sur tous les continents. Ses oreilles laineuses et son gros nez, mais aussi son caractère paisible et sa ressemblance à un ours en peluche renforce cette bonne disposition à son égard.

Le koala dans la culture

Littérature

  • Le Koala tueur et autres histoires du bush, livre de Kenneth Cook, 2009.

Le koala est abondamment présent dans la littérature jeunesse ou enfantine :

  • Les aventures d'Archibald le koala, collection de livres par Paul Cox
  • Bébé Koala, collection à partir de 1 an. Auteur Nadia Berkane, illustrateur Alexis Nesme
  • Le koala apparaît plusieurs fois dans la série Sandy et Hoppy (bandes dessinées de Willy Lambil) : l’épisode de 1959 « Teddy sur l’eucalyptus » (qui met l’accent sur la nourriture du koala et son milieu naturel) ; l’épisode de 1966 « Koalas en péril » (évoquant les trafics de peaux).
  • Le koala est un des héros de la bande dessinée Toto l'ornithorynque (Eric Omond et Yoann).

Graphisme

L'aspect attendrissant du koala en fait une figure recherchée par le marketing qui utilise son image, plus ou moins caricaturée, pour vendre toutes sortes d'articles, de la peluche au paquet de biscuits, en passant par diverses mascottes, des jouets ou des objets quotidiens, généralement destinés aux enfants.

Statut de conservation actuel

Menaces actuelles pour la survie de l'espèce

Panneau de signalisation australien en forme de losange, de couleur jaune, sur lequel figurent un koala et un kangourou avec la mention en anglais We live here too. Please drive carefully(Nous vivons aussi ici, roulez prudemment)
« Nous vivons aussi ici. Roulez prudemment, s'il vous plait ».
  • Destruction, dégradation et fragmentation de l'habitat :
    • Urbanisation galopante[75] et spéculation immobilière
    • Défrichements agricoles
    • Exploitation forestière, destruction des futaies
    • Infrastructures électriques, ferroviaires, autoroutières
  • Surpopulation : souvent dans les îles où les koalas ont été introduits
  • Accidents de la route[75] : décès principalement pendant la période de reproduction alors que les mâles se déplacent beaucoup plus fréquemment.
  • Prédateurs : chiens[75], dingos, chats harets, renards, chouettes et aigles ; les jeunes sont les plus vulnérables
  • Maladies[75] : chlamydiose, pouvant causer l'infertilité ou la mort de certaines populations
  • Changement climatique : déjà perceptible au Queensland occidental et en Nouvelle-Galles du Sud[76]
    • Modifications de la structure et de la chimie des arbres alimentant les koalas
    • Modification des territoires des espèces de l'habitat - tant pour la nourriture que pour les arbres hôtes
    • Sécheresses plus intenses et plus fréquentes
    • Feux de forêts plus intenses et plus fréquents
    • Modification des températures, des précipitations et du taux d'humidité moyen. Le koala est sensible aux canicules[75].
    • Contractions de la distribution du koala

Aujourd'hui, la perte d'habitat et l'impact de l'urbanisation (comme les attaques des chiens ou les accidents de la route) sont les menaces les plus graves pour la survie du koala. Ces dernières années, certaines colonies ont été durement touchées par les maladies, plus particulièrement, chlamydia[77]. L'Australian Koala Foundation est la principale organisation consacrée à la conservation du koala et de son habitat, et qui fait l'inventaire de 400 000 km2 d'espaces vitaux pour les koalas et qui soumet des preuves tangibles du sérieux déclin de l'espèce dans toute sa zone naturelle de répartition[78]. Un problème supplémentaire est posé par le fait que 80 % des koalas vivent sur des terrains privés. Cela est particulièrement vrai sur la côte orientale australienne, où la spéculation immobilière fait rage. L'eucalyptus est aussi utilisé pour fabriquer du mobilier de jardin. 60 % des forêts subsistant en Australie sont composées d'eucalyptus, mais seulement 18 % de ces forêts ne sont pas bouleversées par l'abattage des arbres[65]. L'espace vital se réduit aussi par la déforestation, les mesures d'assèchement des sols et la construction de clôtures.

La population de koalas de l'île Kangourou, dont les koalas ont pour particularité d’être « exempts d’infection » et à ce titre, constituaient une sorte « d’assurance » pour l’avenir de l’espèce, a été très affectée par les feux de brousse de 2019-2020, lors desquels seulement 9000 des 46 000 koalas de l'île Kangourou auraient survécu[79],[80]. Cette population consistait un élément d'autant plus crucial pour la préservation de l'espèce, qu’une grande partie de la population de koalas sur l’île-continent même a été décimée. 80% de leur habitat des koalas sur l'île a été détruit[80].

De plus, l'augmentation de CO2 dans l'atmosphère entraînerait un déclin des apports nutritifs des feuilles d'eucalyptus en diminuant leur taux de protéines et en augmentant leur taux de tanins[81],[82].

Statut des populations

On estime le nombre de koalas existants avant la colonisation européenne à environ 10 millions d'individus[21]. Au début du XXe siècle, l'exploitation commerciale du koala s'est traduite par des millions de fourrures vendues à l'exportation et à la quasi-extinction de l'espèce. Il ne semble pas y avoir de preuves « que la chasse précoce ait eu un impact à long terme sur la population globale », estime-t-on en 2008[83]. En 2001, le koala est repris dans la liste du rapport sur l'état de l'environnement de la Communauté australienne (Commonwealth of Australia) comme étant l'une des huit espèces nuisibles d'Australie[83]. À l'heure actuelle, le statut est déterminé par chaque État fédéré : Queensland, Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, Victoria, Australie-Méridionale. L'estimation de la taille des populations ne fait pas l'unanimité. Des estimations précédentes faisaient état de 100 000 koalas et plus, mais ce chiffre semble fortement exagéré pour l'Australia Koala Foundation. En effet, d'autres estimations concluent à un déclin de 50 à 90 % de la population globale de koalas. Le chiffre réel devrait se situer entre 43 000 et 80 000 individus[21].

L'Australian Koala Foundation estime pour sa part qu'il reste environ 100 000 koalas dans la nature[91]. Elle avait déjà averti pour 2008 que si aucune mesure de protection efficace n'était prise, les koalas seraient dans une situation critique et dès lors menacés d'extinction.
D'après un rapport de l'UICN de décembre 2009 pour la Conférence de Copenhague de 2009 sur le climat, le koala serait l'un des animaux les plus menacés par le réchauffement global[92]. En 2013, une étude de l'université de Sydney précise cette menace : les koalas ont besoin d'autres arbres que les eucalyptus pour survivre à des températures plus élevées, des canicules et des sécheresses[93].

Contrairement à la situation sur la plus grande partie du continent, où les populations déclinent[94], les koalas, comme beaucoup d'autres espèces, peuvent entraîner une explosion démographique dans des petites îles ou des régions isolées où ils ont été introduits[95].

Sur l'île Kangourou en Australie-Méridionale, les koalas introduits il y a quelque 90 ans ont prospéré en l'absence de prédateurs et de concurrence. Combiné à une impossibilité de migrer vers de nouvelles zones, cela a entraîné une surpopulation insupportable qui menace l'écosystème unique de l'île. Plus particulièrement, les gommiers blancs, endémiques à l'île ont été pillés par le koala plus rapidement qu'ils ne pouvaient se régénérer, mettant par là-même en péril les oiseaux locaux et les invertébrés qui dépendent de ces arbres. Au moins une population isolée de gommiers aurait été éradiquée.

Alors qu'on avait suggéré la chasse pour en réduire le nombre et que le gouvernement australien envisageait sérieusement une telle éventualité en 1996, une opposition farouche aussi bien nationale qu'internationale s'est exprimée et l'espèce est restée protégée. La popularité du koala rend certainement toute chasse politiquement improbable, vu les conséquences touristiques et l'impact électoral négatifs. En lieu et place, des programmes de stérilisation et de transfert ont eu un succès limité dans la réduction des effectifs jusqu'à présent et restent coûteux. Une alternative proposée à la méthode complexe de stérilisation, où l'animal doit d'abord être capturé, serait d'injecter des implants hormonaux à distance à l'aide de fléchettes.

Génétique

La réduction des variations génétiques sont un problème potentiel dans la gestion des populations de koalas[96]. Avec les épisodes historiques d'effondrement des populations, les transferts et la fragmentation des territoires, c'est surtout dans les États du sud de l'Australie que le problème se pose, plus particulièrement dans le sud-ouest du Queensland où la fragmentation est très importante. Pour l'instant, cette faible variation n'a pas eu de répercussions prouvées scientifiquement sur les populations[97].

Protection

Historique

En 1890, l'exploitation commerciale est interdite dans le Victoria. À la suite de l'extinction de l'espèce en Australie-Méridionale en 1920, le koala est introduit sur l'île Kangourou et quelques autres localités sur le continent, pour créer des populations de réserves.

En 1927, le Queensland met fin aux permis de chasse.

Protection in-situ

Depuis 2012, le Koala est listé au titre du "Environmental Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999". Les populations protégées sont celles du Queensland, de la Nouvelle Galle du sud et du territoire de la capitale. (Les mesures de protections sont mises en place par les états concernés)

Des conseils municipaux de zones à l'urbanisation galopante ont pris des mesures pour préserver l'espace vital des koalas, entre autres au Victoria: ville de Ballarat[98],[99], comté de la chaîne Macedon[100] et Glenelg Hopkins Catchment Management Authority[99] et au Queensland :Région de la baie Moreton, Redland City.

Au Queensland

L'état doit légalement tenir compte des habitats du Koala lors de la planification des projets d'infrastructures. La perte d'habitat, occasionnée par les projets d'infrastructure, doit être compensée, ceci soit par une compensation financière soit directement en replantant des arbres pour restaurer l'habitat des koalas (une combinaison des deux est possible). L'état achète des terrains et signe des contrats de gestion avec les propriétaires fonciers dans les zones prioritaires pour leur conservation[101].

En Nouvelle-Galles du Sud

La stratégie de cet état se décline en plusieurs points :

  • transformer 20 000 ha de forêt publique (possédées par l'état) en réserves pour Koala, et transformer en Parcs nationaux 4 000 ha de forêt primaire où l'espèce est présente et acquérir des terres pour la protection de l'espèce ;
  • sécuriser les principaux point de collisions routière avec les koalas ;
  • créer un réseau efficace de centres de soin dans toute la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud et mettre en place un numéro unique d'appel pour signaler les koalas en détresse[102].

Maintien en captivité

Koala endormi sur une fourche dans un enclos complètement grillagé
Koala au zoo de Chiang Mai en Thaïlande.

Les premiers koalas à être maintenus en captivité le sont en 1920, au Koala Park de Sydney pour être exposés au public. Depuis, ils sont de plus en plus montrés dans des enclos d'exposition.

Comme pour la plupart des animaux endémiques de l'Australie, le koala ne peut être détenu légalement comme animal particulier en Australie ou partout ailleurs. Les seules personnes habilitées à garder des koalas sont les professionnels de la protection de la nature et occasionnellement les chercheurs scientifiques. Ils reçoivent à cet effet des permis spéciaux, mais doivent les relâcher dans la nature dès qu'ils vont mieux ou alors, quand il s'agit de juvéniles, dès qu'ils sont assez âgés[103].

Dans les parcs zoologiques, les koalas ne sont que très rarement montrés en dehors d'Australie, ce qui est dû à la difficulté de mettre à la disposition des animaux suffisamment d'eucalyptus adaptés. Il est en effet essentiel de bien comprendre leurs préférences alimentaires. Afin de pourvoir aux besoins des koalas, les zoos doivent mettre en place une plantation d'eucalyptus. Pour chaque koala, le besoin est de 500 à 1000 arbres de cinq ou six espèces différentes. Il faut planter les arbres quatre à six ans avant d'accueillir les koalas[21] En enclos, les koalas ne peuvent pas particulièrement exprimer leur disposition à vagabonder, car ils se retrouvent dans des conditions restreintes et à la densité bien plus haute que dans la nature. Ils montrent encore malgré tout certains traits de comportements similaires à leurs congénères sauvages tels que la territorialité et la hiérarchie des mâles. Les femelles ont une tendance accrue à s'accoupler entre elles en captivité. Les koalas se laissent dans la plupart des cas facilement réintroduire dans la nature.

Le Zoo de San Diego occupe une place particulière, car son programme d'élevage des koalas est le plus fructueux en dehors d'Australie. Il a accueilli des koalas dès 1925, a enregistré sa première naissance en 1960 et en comptabilise plus d'une centaine depuis 1976. Il faut dire que le zoo fait pousser 35 espèces d'eucalyptus et offre à ses koalas au moins quatre espèces différentes par jour. Fort de ce succès, le zoo a lancé un programme de prêt pour l'éducation et la conservation. Des koalas sont prêtés aux zoos du monde entier qui disposent de programmes similaires. En partenariat avec la Fondation australienne pour les koalas (Australian Koala Foundation), le Zoo de San Diego produit l'Atlas de l'habitat du koala (Koala Habitat Atlas).

Le système international d'information sur les espèces tient le registre actualisé de leur détention dans le monde entier.

Europe

Les koalas d'Europe sont tous de la sous-espèce du Queensland : Phascolarctos cinereus adustus et sont tous issus du Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary, au Queensland, Australie par l’intermédiaire d'importations directes ou d'importations d'autres zoos (tel San Diego) dont les animaux originaux sont eux-mêmes issus du Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary.

Il y a onze zoos publics en Europe ayant des koalas, listés ci-dessous.

  • Autriche (un zoo) : zoo de Schönbrunn, à Vienne depuis 2002. Le Zoo de Schönbrunn à une paire seulement de koala (nombres pour 2017).
  • Belgique (trois zoos) : zoo de Planckendael (Planckendael), depuis 1998 avec une interruption en 2016 cessée depuis une nouvelle importation d'une paire en 2016 provenant du zoo de Leipzig (individu mâle) et du Zoo de Beauval (individu femelle). Parc Pairi Daiza à Brugelette depuis 2016, qui a eu jusqu'à 5 koalas[104] provenant d'une importation d'animaux du Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary. Zoo d'Anvers depuis 2015 suivant une importation d'animaux provenant du zoo de Planckendael.
  • Portugal (un zoo) : Zoo de Lisbonne (Jardim Zoológico de Lisboa) depuis 1991 suivant une importation d'animaux provenant du Zoo de San Diego, ce qui fait d'eux les koalas les plus vieux d'Europe.
  • Royaume-Uni (un zoo) : Zoo d'Édimbourg depuis 2005 suivant une importation d'animaux provenant du zoo de San Diego.

L'Allemagne et la Belgique sont les pays d'Europe ayant le plus de zoos qui hébergent des koalas avec trois zoos chacun. L'importation européenne la plus ancienne dont les animaux sont encore vivants est celui du Zoo de Lisbonne en 1991.

L'Europe a eu deux sous-espèces de koalas à travers le temps. Le Koala de Nouvelle-Galles du Sud, qui n'est plus hébergé dans aucun zoo d'Europe, et le nettement plus commun Koala du Queensland encore présent en Europe. La première importation de Koalas datée en Europe se serait passée en l'an 1880 et était dirigé vers le Zoo de Londres où le dernier animal de cette importation mourut en 1882 (seulement deux ans après ce qui montre le manque de connaissance sur la façon de garder des koalas captifs que les zoos avaient à cette époque), ces koalas-là étaient de la sous-espèce du Queensland. Parmi d'autres zoos européens notables ayant eu des koalas mais n'ayant plus cette espèce à présent nous pouvons lister les zoos suivants.

  • Allemagne (un) :

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) : Jardin zoologique de Berlin-Friedrichsfelde (importation de San Diego, individu ayant vécu du 15/04/1994 au 17/09/1994).

  • Espagne (un) :

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) : le Zoo de Barcelone a eu des koalas en 1994 (provenant de San Diego).

  • Hongrie (un) :

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) : le seul zoo ayant eu des koalas en Hongrie était le Zoo de Budapest, de 2015 à 2017.

  • Irlande (un) :

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus adustus) : Le seul zoo ayant eu des koalas en Irlande était le Zoo de Dublin, en 1988 suivant une importation d'animaux provenant du zoo de San Diego

  • Portugal (un) :

- Koala de Nouvelles-Galles du Sud (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus) : le Zoo de Lisbonne possède toujours une paire de Koala du Queensland depuis 1991, néanmoins le zoo fut aussi l'un des deux seuls zoos en Europe à avoir quelques individus de la sous-espèce de Nouvelles-Galles du Sud (date inconnue).

  • Royaume-Uni (un) :

- Koala de Nouvelles-Galles du Sud (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus) : le Zoo de Londres est le seul zoo d'Europe avec Lisbonne à avoir eu deux sous-espèces de koala différentes. En effet, ce zoo fut l'un des deux seuls zoos en Europe à avoir quelques individus de la sous-espèce de Nouvelles-Galles du Sud (date inconnue).

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus) : le Zoo de Londres a possédé deux femelles koalas provenant du Zoo de San Diego de 1989 à 1991.

  • Suède (un) :

- Koala du Queensland (Phascolarctos cinereus cinereus) : l'aquarium de Skanset (Skanset/Akvariet) à Stockholm a possédé deux mâles koalas provenant du Zoo de San Diego de 2005 à 2007.

Amérique du Nord

Afrique

Afrique du Sud : Zoo de Pretoria

Asie

Australie

L'Australie compte de multiples zoos et réserves naturelles où l'on peut admirer des koalas.

Notes et références

(de)/(en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu des articles intitulés en allemand et en anglais .
(mk)/(nl) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu des articles intitulés en macédonien et en néerlandais .
(ru) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en russe intitulé .
  1. a et b (en) « Welcome To Cohunu Koala Park », sur cohunu.com.au.
  2. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary - Discover Tasmania.
  3. « Australie: Les koalas vont disparaître et il est trop tard pour les sauver », sur lavoixdunord.fr, 16 mai 2019 (consulté le 19 mai 2019).
  4. « En Australie, une femme sauve un koala piégé par les flammes », sur AFP, 19 novembre 2019.
  5. (en) « Bigger and better 'Blinky Drinkers' to quench koalas' thirst this summer », sur NSW Environment, Energy and Science (consulté le 15 janvier 2020).
  6. Jackson, pp. 73–74.
  7. (en) « Bigger and better 'Blinky Drinkers' to quench koalas' thirst this summer », sur NSW Environment, Energy and Science (consulté le 15 janvier 2020).
  8. Dixon, R. M. W.; Moore, B.; Ramson, W. S.; Thomas, M. (2006). Australian Aboriginal Words in English: Their Origin and Meaning (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. p. 65. (ISBN 978-0-19-554073-4).
  9. Leitner, G.; Sieloff, I. (1998). "Aboriginal words and concepts in Australian English". World Englishes. 17 (2): 153–69. doi:10.1111/1467-971X.00089.
  10. a b et c Titre : Cambodge et Java : ruines khmères et javanaises, 1893-1894 / texte et dessins par M. Albert Tissandier…Éditeur : G. Masson (Paris) Date d'édition : 1896.
  11. C'est par exemple le cas de Onya-Birri, le seul bébé koala albinos du monde né en captivité, au zoo de San Diego, aux États-Unis.
  12. (en) « Rare white koala gets medical help in Australia », Reuters,‎ 24 septembre 2007 (lire en ligne).
  13. (en) John A. Byers, « Play's the thing », Findarticles.com, 1er juillet 1999 (consulté le 2 juin 2013).
  14. (en) « Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) Fact Sheet 2003 » , Spot.colorado.edu (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  15. T.F. Flannery, The Future Eaters : An ecological History of the Australasian Lands and People, Sydney, Reed New Holland, 1994, p. 86.
  16. « Koala Infographique - animaux, Queensland, Australie », sur www.queensland.com (consulté le 5 mars 2020).
  17. (en) D. Macdonald (dir.) et Roger Martin, The Encyclopedia of Mammals, New York, Facts on File, 1984 (ISBN 0-87196-871-1), p. 872–875.
  18. (en) Maciej Henneberg, Kosette M. Lambert et Chris M. Leigh, « Fingerprint homoplasy: koalas and humans », Natural Science, vol. 1, no 4,‎ 1997 (lire en ligne).
  19. https://www.maxisciences.com/empreinte-digitale/les-empreintes-digitales-des-koalas-similaires-a-celles-de-l-homme_art14405.html.
  20. https://www.gurumed.org/2011/05/06/les-koalas-ont-exactement-les-mmes-empreintes-palmaires-que-les-humains/.
  21. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x et y Fiche signalétique du koala du Zoo de San Diego.
  22. A. K. Lee & F. N. Carrick, Fauna of Australia 1 31. Phascolarctidae.
  23. (en) Australian Koala Foundation, « How koalas live, socialise & communicate ».
  24. (en) [PDF] , H. Alfred, M. B. Young, On the male generative organs of the Koala.(Phascolarctos Cinereus). 1879, Owens College, Manchester. (Plate XVIII).
  25. T. J. Dawson et al., « Morphology and Physiology of Metatheria », Fauna of Australia,‎ 1989, p. 51, 53 (ISBN 978 0 644 06056 1, lire en ligne [PDF]).
  26. (en) « Koalas 'could face extinction' », sur news.bbc.co.uk (consulté le 21 décembre 2010).
  27. « Facts about Koalas », Koalaplayworld.com (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  28. (en) Stephen M. Jackson, Australian mammals : biology and captive management, Melbourne, CSIRO Publishing, 2003, 524 p. (ISBN 978-0-643-06635-9, LCCN , lire en ligne), « Koalas », p. 524.
  29. « Koalas Welfare - 16 November 1995 - ADJ - NSW Parliament », Parliament.nsw.gov.au (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  30. Ian Anderson, « Please don't cuddle the koalas », New Scientist,‎ 2 décembre 1995 (lire en ligne, consulté le 21 octobre 2009).
  31. Nutrients, Antinutrients and Leaf Selection by Captive Koalas (Phascolarctos-Cinereus). ID Hume and C Esson, Australian Journal of Zoology 41(4) 379 - 392, .
  32. a b et c (ga) « Tuigtear anois cén fáth go dtig leis an gcóála duilleoga eocailipe nimhneacha a ithe », Tuairisc.ie,‎ 17 juillet 2018 (lire en ligne, consulté le 21 juillet 2018).
  33. (en) « Koalas are eating their forests into extinction — even feasting on poisonous eucalyptus plants », National Post,‎ 4 juillet 2018 (lire en ligne, consulté le 21 juillet 2018).
  34. La mère, après la naissance de son petit, émet des féces liquides, si bien que le petit, dont le tube digestif est stérile, vient lécher les poils anaux maternels. L'inoculation du microbiote maternel permet ainsi la colonisation dans son tube digestif des bactéries symbiotiques indispensables à la digestion.
  35. (en) Peter Kuhnert, Bożena Korczak, Enevold Falsen, Reto Straub, Anneliese Hoops, Patrick Boerlin, Joachim Frey & Reinier Mutters, « Lonepinella koalarum gen. nov., sp. nov., a New Tannin-Protein Complex Degrading Bacterium », Systematic and Applied Microbiology, vol. 18, no 3,‎ 1995, p. 368-373 (DOI ).
  36. M Smith, « Behaviour of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss), in Captivity VI*. Aggression », Australian Wildlife Research, vol. 7, no 2,‎ 1980, p. 177–190 (DOI , lire en ligne).
  37. a b c et d Novelguide.
  38. (en) Koala Research.
  39. (en) « University of Queensland Koala Study program » (consulté le 8 avril 2013).
  40. (en) Roger Martin et Kathrine Ann Handasyde, The Koala : Natural History, Conservation and Management, UNSW Press, coll. « Australian Natural History Series », 1999, 2e éd., 132 p. (ISBN 0-86840-544-2, lire en ligne), p. 64-65.
  41. The encyclopedia of animals p. 249. Amber.
  42. (en) D. Macdonald (dir.) et Roger Martin, The Encyclopedia of Mammals, New York, Facts on File, 1984 (ISBN 0-87196-871-1), p. 872–875.
  43. a b c et d (en) [PDF] "National Koala Conservation and Management Strategy 2009-2014".
  44. (en) Australian Koala Foundation, « What to do if you find a sick, injured or dead koala ».
  45. (en) Koalachirus perkinsi (Domrow) - the koala fur mite.
  46. koala fur mite.
  47. R.M.W. Dixon, Bruce Moore, W.S. Ramson, Mandy Thomas, Australian Aboriginal Words in English : Their Origin and Meaning, South Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 2006 (ISBN 0-19-554073-5).
  48. R.M.W. Dixon, Bruce Moore, W.S. Ramson, Mandy Thomas, Australian Aboriginal Words in English : Their Origin and Meaning, South Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 2006 (ISBN 0-19-554073-5).
  49. a et b Penny cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, Volumes 13 à 14, C. Knight, 1839.
  50. Koala dans la 9e édition (1992-…) du Dictionnaire de l'Académie française, sur Atilf.
  51. (en) Gerhard Leitner et Inke Sieloff, « Aboriginal words and concepts in Australian English », World Englishes, vol. 17, no 2,‎ 1998, p. 153–169 (DOI ).
  52. www.ferngallery.com, « Australian Koala Foundation », Savethekoala.com (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  53. « Australian Fauna », Australian Fauna (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  54. « Australasian Regional Association of Zoological Parks and Aquaria », Arazpa.org.au (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  55. Australian Koala Foundation, « Frequently asked questions (FAQs) ».
  56. Australian Koala Foundation, « Interesting facts about koalas ».
  57. R.M.W. Dixon, Bruce Moore, W.S. Ramson, Mandy Thomas, Australian Aboriginal Words in English : Their Origin and Meaning, South Melbourne, Oxford University Press, 2006 (ISBN 0-19-554073-5).
  58. Encyclopédie du dix-neuvième siècle : répertoire universel des sciences, des lettres et des arts, avec la biographie de tous les hommes célèbres. T. 14, HEN-LIT ; Date d'édition : 1836-1853.
  59. D.A. Kidd, Collins Latin Gem Dictionary, Londres, Collins, 1973 (ISBN 0-00-458641-7), p. 53.
  60. Nom vernaculaire en français d’après Termium plus, la banque de données terminologiques et linguistiques du gouvernement du Canada.
  61. a b c et d (en) koala dans Murray Wrobel, 2007. Elsevier's dictionary of mammals: in Latin, English, German, French and Italian. Elsevier, 2007. (ISBN 0-444-51877-0), 9780444518774. 857 pages.
  62. (en) Koala: a historical biography 2008. Par Ann Mozley Moyal, Michael Organ. (page 197).
  63. (en) Nimiokoala greystanesi Australian museum.
  64. (TPDB), consulté en 2010.
  65. a b et c Final Determination of Threatened Status for the Koala.
  66. (en) B.A. Houlden, B. H. Costello, D. Sharkey, E.V. Fowler, A. Melzer, W.A.H. Ellis, F.N. Carrick, P.R. Baverstock et M.S. Elphinstone, « Phylogeographic differentiation in the mitochondrial control region in the koala, Phascolarctos cinereus (Goldfuss 1817) », Molecular Ecology,‎ 1999.
  67. (en) Référence NCBI : Phascolarctos cinereus (taxons inclus).
  68. Roger William Martin,Kathrine Ann Handasyde: The koala: natural history, conservation and management. Krieger Publishing Company; Auflage: 2d edition (Juni 1999). (ISBN 1-57524-136-6).
  69. « Koobor the Koala » (consulté le 8 avril 2013) et Koobor the Koala and Water (folklore).
  70. a et b (en) Michael Organ, « The Discovery of the Koala: Hat Hill (Mount Kembla), New South Wales 1803 » (consulté le 10 avril 2009) “There is another animal which the natives call a cullawine, which much resembles the sloths in America.” (Price, 1895).
  71. Raymond Evans, A History of Queensland, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Cambridge University Press, 2007, 328 p. (ISBN 978-0-521-87692-6, lire en ligne), p. 168.
  72. Raymond Evans, A History of Queensland, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Cambridge University Press, 2007, 328 p. (ISBN 978-0-521-87692-6, lire en ligne), p. 168.
  73. Raymond Evans, A History of Queensland, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Cambridge University Press, 2007, 328 p. (ISBN 978-0-521-87692-6, lire en ligne), p. 168.
  74. Maxime Lancien, « En Australie, une saison en enfer », sur Le Monde diplomatique, 1er janvier 2020.
  75. a b c d et e AFP, « Le koala menacé d'extinction à cause du réchauffement climatique », Le Monde,‎ 3 octobre 2013 (lire en ligne).
  76. Natural Resource Management Ministerial Council 2009.
  77. Bonnie Malkin, Koalas 'extinct within 30 years' after chlamydia outbreak, The Telegraph, 10 novembre 2009.
  78. Australian Koala Foundation, « Koalas - Endangered or Not? ».
  79. « Incendies en Australie : il ne reste que 9000 koalas sur les 46 000 de l'île Kangourou », sur actu.fr (consulté le 16 janvier 2020).
  80. a et b Par A. T. avec AFP à 20h24, « Incendies en Australie : des dizaines de koalas soignés dans un hôpital sur l’île Kangourou », sur leparisien.fr, 14 janvier 2020 (consulté le 16 janvier 2020).
  81. (en) Australian Academy of Science, « Koalas Under Threat From Climate Change », sur ScienceDaily, 9 mai 2008 (consulté le 3 juin 2020).
  82. (en) The IUCN red list of threatened species, « Koalas and climate change - hungry for CO2 cuts », sur IUCN, décembre 2009 (consulté le 3 juin 2020).
  83. a et b Gordon et al 2008.
  84. UICN Phascolarctos cinereus.
  85. US Fish and Wildlife Service, « Threatened and Endangered Species System ».
  86. Australian Government, « Environmental assessment of koala's conservation status ».
  87. [PDF] Australian Government, « Environmental Finalised Priority Assessment List for the Assessment Period Commencing 1 October 2008 ».
  88. Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, « EPA/QPWS Koala designation ».
  89. New South Wales Parks and Wildlife Service, « NSWPWS Koala profile ».
  90. Department of Sustainability and the Environment, « Victorian Koala designation ».
  91. Australian Koala Foundation, « Potential Koala Habitat in 2008 ».
  92. « Polarfuchs und Koalabär bedroht » sur www.fr-online.de.
  93. Mathew Crowther, Ecography, 3 octobre 2013.
  94. Australian Koala Foundation, « Koalas - Endangered or Not? ».
  95. « Koalas Overrunning Australia Island "Ark" », News.nationalgeographic.com (consulté le 9 mars 2009).
  96. Sherwin et al. 2000.
  97. QPWS.
  98. (en) VCAT knocks back Mt Helen subdivision sur www.thecourier.com.
  99. a et b (en) [PDF]Implementing the Ballarat Koala Plan of Management through the Ballarat Planning Scheme Amendment C95 sur www.ballarat.vic.gov.au.
  100. (en) HAVE YOUR SAY: Macedon Ranges koala habitat plea sur macedon-ranges-leader.whereilive.com.au.
  101. (en) « Koala legislation and policy », sur environment.des.qld.gov.
  102. (en) « NSW Koala strategy », sur www.environment.nsw.gov.au (consulté en février 2019).
  103. Australian Koala Foundation, « Frequently asked questions (FAQs) ».
  104. https://www.brusselstimes.com/brussels/99472/footage-of-man-smearing-saliva-on-brussels-metro-pole-goes-viral-stib-drunk/.

Annexes

Références taxinomiques

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Koala: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Phascolarctos cinereus

Le koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), appelé aussi Paresseux australien, est une espèce de marsupial arboricole herbivore endémique d'Australie et le seul représentant encore vivant de la famille des Phascolarctidés. On le trouve dans les régions côtières de l'Australie-Méridionale et orientale, d'Adélaïde à la partie sud de la péninsule du cap York. Les populations s'étendent aussi sur des distances considérables dans l'arrière-pays australien (outback), là où l'humidité est suffisante pour le maintien de forêts. Les koalas d'Australie-Méridionale furent exterminés au début du XXe siècle, mais cet État fédéré a depuis été repeuplé grâce à des transferts du Victoria. Cet animal n'était plus présent ni en Tasmanie, ni en Australie-Occidentale, mais il y a été réintroduit,.

Le koala est étroitement lié à l'eucalyptus ou gommier, dont il ne mange que les feuilles de certaines espèces. Les mâles peuvent vivre en moyenne 15 ans, et les femelles 20 ans.

C'est, avec le kangourou, l'un des principaux symboles de l'Australie. Après avoir été chassé massivement pour sa fourrure, il est aujourd'hui principalement menacé par la fragilité et le recul de son biotope. Il reste moins de 80 000 koalas vivant en liberté et ce nombre continue de décliner. Les koalas disparaissent à cause des menaces qui pèsent sur leur habitat et des vagues de chaleur dues au réchauffement climatique. Ils ont ainsi perdu 80 % de leur habitat naturel.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

코알라

provided by wikipedia 한국어 위키백과
 src= 다른 뜻에 대해서는 코알라 (동음이의) 문서를 참고하십시오.

코알라(영어: Koala, 학명: Phascolarctos cinereus)는 오스트레일리아에 서식하는 초식성 유대류로, 코알라과(Phascolarctidae)에 속하는 유일한 이다.

몸길이 60-80cm, 몸무게 4-15kg이다. 꼬리는 거의 없고, 코가 크다. 앞·뒷발에 모두 5개씩 발가락이 있는데, 앞발 제1·제2발가락은 다른 발가락과 서로 마주보며 나뭇가지를 잡는 데 적합하다. 암컷의 배에는 육아낭이 있는데, 뒤쪽으로 입구가 있으며 안에 2개의 젖꼭지가 있다. 털은 양털처럼 빽빽이 나 있으며 윗면은 암회색, 아랫면은 회백색이고 특히 귀의 털이 길다. 맹장은 몸길이의 약 3배로 포유류 중에서 가장 길어 2.4m나 된다.

생활

주로 밤에 활동하며, 유칼립투스의 삼림지에만 서식하며 이 나무의 잎들이 그들의 식단의 대부분을 차지한다. 이 유칼립투스 식단은 영양과 칼로리 함량이 제한되어 있기 때문에, 코알라는 주로 앉아서 하루에 20시간까지 잠을 잔다. 보금자리는 만들지 않고, 낮에는 나뭇가지 위에 안전하게 걸터앉아서 낮잠을 잔다. 대부분 단독으로 생활하고 성질은 순하고 동작도 느리다. 수명은 15-20년 정도이다. 임신 기간은 약 35일이고, 보통 한 배에 한 마리의 새끼를 낳는다. 새끼는 몸길이 1.7-1.9cm, 몸무게 1g 이하이고, 털이 나지 않은 미숙한 상태로 태어난다. 그 뒤 육아낭 안에서 몇 달 동안 자란 뒤, 약 6달 동안 어미에게 업혀 지낸다. 새끼가 젖을 뗄 무렵에는 어미의 항문에 입을 대고 반쯤 소화된 유칼립투스나무 잎을 먹는다. 모피 때문에 남획되어 수가 감소하였으므로, 현재는 오스트레일리아·미국·일본 등지의 동물원에서 양육·보호되고 있다. 오스트레일리아 남동부에 분포한다.

이름의 유래

코알라는 오스트레일리아 원주민의 언어인 다루크어로 "물을 먹지 않는다"라는 의미를 가진 굴라(gula)에서 비롯된 이름이다. 유럽에서 건너간 초기 이주민들은 코알라를 토종곰, 코알라곰 등으로 불렀으나 생물학적으로 코알라는 곰과는 아무런 연관이 없다. 그러나 초기 이주민의 선입견은 코알라의 학명에도 영향을 끼쳤다. 코알라의 학명 Phascolarctos는 주머니달린(그리스어: phaskolos) 곰(그리스어: arctos)이란 뜻이다.

사진

계통 분류

다음은 캥거루목의 계통 분류이다.[1]

캥거루목 웜뱃아목

코알라과

  웜뱃상과  

† Diprotodontidae

   

웜뱃과

        캥거루아목

사향쥐캥거루과

     

쥐캥거루과

   

캥거루과

      쿠스쿠스아목 쿠스쿠스상과  

쿠스쿠스과

   

꼬마주머니쥐과

    주머니하늘다람쥐상과  

반지꼬리주머니쥐과

     

주머니하늘다람쥐과

     

꿀주머니쥐과

   

깃털꼬리주머니쥐과

             

대중 문화

캐릭터

기타

천적은 딩고, 여우, 대형맹금류다.

각주

  1. Meredith, Robert W.; Westerman, Michael; Springer, Mark S. (2009년 2월 26일). “A phylogeny of Diprotodontia (Marsupialia) based on sequences for five nuclear genes” (PDF). 《Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution》 51: 554–571. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2009.02.009. PMID 19249373. 2015년 5월 5일에 확인함.
license
ko
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/