dcsimg

Brief Summary

provided by EOL authors

Cicadidae is one of two families of cicadas (order Hemiptera) which includes an estimated 2500 described species in three subfamilies and many others yet to be described, found in temperate to tropical climates on every continent in the world except Antarctica.The other cicada family is the primitive Australian Tettigarctidae (hairy cicadas), which contains two extant species.

Most closely related to leaf, tree, and plant hoppers, cicadas are large singing insects, often colloquially called locusts.This is incorrect, as locusts are species of swarming grasshoppers, but because the periodical cicadas -see below- emerge in such enormous numbers they were interpreted as locusts by early American settlers, an error which has continued to the present).Males have structures called tymbals on their abdomens with which they produce species-specific "songs"; females do not sing, but can make clicking noises with their wings.

Cicadas spend most of their lives in larval form (called nymphs).Depending on the species the nymphs live up to 2.5 meters (8.2 feet) below ground, feeding on plant sap from roots, which they pierce with their long proboscis.In the nymphs' final developmental stage, they dig their way to the surface with powerful digging legs, pull themselves up to a plant stem, and molt into an adult with prominent eyes and clear wings.They leave behind a very recognizable larval casing, with the slit on the dorsal side from whence the adult emerged clearly visible. After molting, the adults mate and females lay hundreds of eggs in slits they cut into tree bark.When the eggs hatch, the nymphs drop to the ground and burrow.

Cidadas are quite diverse in looks and behaviors.Most adults are between 2 to 5 cm (0.79–2.0in) in length, although Asian species in the genera Pomponia, Megapomponia, and Tagua measure 4.7-7 cm (1.8-2.8 inches) in total length, with the largest species (the empress cicada) reaching a 20 cm (8 inch) wingspan.

Most cicada species live for 2-8 years as larvae with individuals erupting from the ground every year (annual cicadas).However the seven well-known species of periodical cicadas (Magicicada), found only in North America, precisely synchronize their development so that almost all individuals in the same geographic area emerge as “broods” in the same year, either as 13 or 17 year cycles.These prime-year, large-scale emergences are thought to be adaptations to overwhelm predators (a phenomenon termed “predator satiation”). Periodical cicadas can hatch in enormous numbers of up to 1.5 million individual per acre, over large areas along the eastern seaboard and west to Kansas.

Cicadas are eaten around the world by many cultures and different animals, used in traditional medicines in Asia, and surface in many stories and customs.While a cicada might mistake you for a food source and try to poke you with its proboscis, these insects do not sting or bite and pose no danger to humans.

For more information on periodical cicadas see the EOL Magicicada page and the website of Prof. Chris Simon and colleagues.

(Simon 2013; Ramel 2013; Wikipedia 2013)

license
cc-by-3.0
copyright
Dana Campbell
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Identification guide to New Zealand cicadas (Insecta: Hemiptera: Cicadidae)

provided by EOL authors
This identification guide to New Zealand cicadas provides a revised and expanded version of a previous guide by Larivière et al. (2006-2010) published in a journal (The New Zealand Hemiptera) that was discontinued in August 2012 when its hosting website was permanently archived.

Identification tools to the 5 genera and 42 native (and mostly endemic) species of New Zealand cicadas are provided here or hyperlinks are given to access resources available elsewhere.
license
cc-publicdomain
original
visit source
partner site
EOL authors

Cicadidae

provided by wikipedia EN

 src=
Tibicen linnei

Cicadidae, the true cicadas,[1] is the largest family of cicadas, with more than 3,200 species worldwide. The oldest known definitive fossils are from the Paleocene, a nymph from the Cretaceous Burmese amber has been attributed to the family, but could also belong to the Tettigarctidae.[2]

Description and Life Cycle

Description

Cicadas are large insects characterized by their membranous wings, triangular-formation of three ocelli on the top of their heads, and their short, bristle-like antennae.[3]

Life Cycle

Cicadas are generally separated into two categories based on their adult emergence pattern. Annual cicadas remain underground as nymphs for two or more years and the population is not locally synchronized in its development, so that some adults mature each year or in most years. Periodical cicadas also have multiple-year life cycles but emerge in synchrony or near synchony in any one location and are absent as adults in the intervening years. The most well-known periodical cicadas, genus Magicicada, emerge as adults every 13 or 17 years.[4]

Ecology

Communication

Cicadas are known for the loud airborne sounds that males of most species make to attract mates. One member of this family, Brevisana brevis, the "shrill thorntree cicada", is the loudest insect in the world, able to produce a song that exceeds 100 decibels.[5] Male cicadas can produce four types of acoustic signals: songs, calls, low-amplitude songs, and disturbance sounds.[6] Unlike members of the order Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets, and katydids), who use stridulation to produce sounds, members of Cicadidae produce sounds using a pair of tymbals, which are modified membranes located on the abdomen. In order to produce sound, each tymbal is pulled inwards by a connected muscle, and the deformation of the stiff membrane produces a 'click.'[7]

Reproductive Behavior

Newly emerged cicadas climb up trees and molt into their adult stage, now equipped with wings. Males call to attract females, producing the distinct noisy songs cicadas are known for. Females respond to males with a 'click' made by flicking their wings. Once a male has found a female partner, his call changes to indicate that they are a mating pair.[8]

Classification

Cicadidae is one of two families within the superfamily Cicadoidea. This superfamily is in the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, containing cicadas, hoppers, and relatives, within the order Hemiptera, the true bugs. There are five subfamilies within Cicadidae: Cicadettinae, Cicadinae, Tettigomyiinae, Tibicininae,[9] and Derotettiginae.[10]

Subfamily Cicadettinae Buckton, 1890

Subfamily Cicadinae Latreille, 1802

Subfamily Tettigomyiinae Distant, 1905

Subfamily Tibicininae Distant, 1905

Subfamily Derotettiginae Moulds, 2019 [14]

Notes

  1. ^ Synonomised with Tacuini Distant, 1904 by Marshall et al. (2018 p. 38).[9] Tacuini has date priority.
  2. ^ Sinosenini Boulard, 1975, is now recognized as a subjective junior synonym of subtribe Dundubiina Distant, 1905.[11]
  3. ^ Orapini Boulard, 1985, is now recognized as a subjective junior synonym of Platypleurini Schmidt, 1918.[12]
  4. ^ Synonomised with Cryptotympanini Handlirsch, 1925 by Marshall et al. (2018 p. 38).[9] Tacuini has date priority.
  5. ^ Lacetasini Moulds and Marshall, 2018, is now recognized as a subjective junior synonym of Iruanini Boulard, 1983.[13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Pons, P. True cicadas (Cicadidae) as prey for the birds of the Western Palearctic: a review. Avian Res 11, 14 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40657-020-00200-1
  2. ^ MOULDS, M. S. (2018-06-22). "Cicada fossils (Cicadoidea: Tettigarctidae and Cicadidae) with a review of the named fossilised Cicadidae". Zootaxa. 4438 (3): 443–470. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4438.3.2. ISSN 1175-5334. PMID 30313130.
  3. ^ "Family Cicadidae".
  4. ^ "Periodical Cicadas".
  5. ^ "Loudest | Science Literacy and Outreach | Nebraska".
  6. ^ Cocroft, R. B., & Pogue, M. (1996). Social Behavior and Communication in the Neotropical Cicada Fidicina mannifera (Fabricius) (Homoptera: Cicadidae). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society, 69(4), 85–97. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25085708
  7. ^ Young D, Bennet-Clark H. The role of the tymbal in cicada sound production. J Exp Biol. 1995;198(Pt 4):1001-20. PMID 9318802.
  8. ^ "Amazing Cicada Life Cycle."Youtube, uploaded by BBC Studios, 24 Oct. 2008, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjLiWy2nT7U
  9. ^ a b c Marshall, David C.; Moulds, Max; Hill, Kathy B. R.; Price, Benjamin W.; Wade, Elizabeth J.; Owen, Christopher L.; Goemans, Geert; Marathe, Kiran; Sarkar, Vivek; Cooley, John R.; Sanborn, Allen F.; Kunte, Krushnamegh; Villet, Martin H.; Simon, Chris (28 May 2018). "A molecular phylogeny of the cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae) with a review of tribe and subfamily classification". Zootaxa. 4424 (1): 1–64. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4424.1.1. PMID 30313477. S2CID 52976455.
  10. ^ Chris Simon, Eric R L Gordon, M S Moulds, Jeffrey A Cole, Diler Haji, Alan R Lemmon, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Michelle Kortyna, Katherine Nazario, Elizabeth J Wade, Russell C Meister, Geert Goemans, Stephen M Chiswell, Pablo Pessacq, Claudio Veloso, John P McCutcheon, Piotr Łukasik, Off-target capture data, endosymbiont genes and morphology reveal a relict lineage that is sister to all other singing cicadas, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Volume 128, Issue 4, December 2019, Pages 865–886, https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blz120
  11. ^ Hill, Kathy B. R.; Marshall, David C.; Marathe, Kiran; Moulds, Maxwell S.; Lee, Young June; Pham, Thai-Hong; Mohagan, Alma B.; Sarkar, Vivek; Price, Benjamin W.; Duffels, J. P.; Schouten, Marieke A.; de Boer, Arnold J.; Kunte, Krushnamegh; Simon, Chris (2021). "The molecular systematics and diversification of a taxonomically unstable group of Asian cicada tribes related to Cicadini Latreille, 1802 (Hemiptera : Cicadidae)". Invertebrate Systematics. 35 (5): 570. doi:10.1071/IS20079. S2CID 237857963.
  12. ^ Price, Benjamin W.; Marshall, David C.; Barker, Nigel P.; Simon, Chris; Villet, Martin H. (October 2019). "Out of Africa? A dated molecular phylogeny of the cicada tribe Platypleurini Schmidt (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), with a focus on African genera and the genus Platypleura Amyot & Audinet‐Serville". Systematic Entomology. 44 (4): 842–861. doi:10.1111/syen.12360. S2CID 133591262.
  13. ^ Sanborn, Allen F.; Marshall, David C.; Moulds, Maxwell S.; Puissant, Stéphane; Simon, Chris (2 March 2020). "Redefinition of the cicada tribe Hemidictyini Distant, 1905, status of the tribe Iruanini Boulard, 1993 rev. stat., and the establishment of Hovanini n. tribe and Sapantangini n. tribe (Hemiptera: Cicadidae)". Zootaxa. 4747 (1): 133–155. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.4747.1.5. PMID 32230121. S2CID 214750328.
  14. ^ Simon, Chris; Gordon, Eric R. L.; Moulds, Max S.; Cole, Jerrrey A.; Haji, Diler; Lemmon, Alan R.; Lemmon, Emily Moriarty; Kortyna, Michelle; Nazario, Kathrine; Wade, Elizabeth J.; Meister, Russell C.; Goemans, Geert; Chiswell, Stephen M.; Pessacq, Pablo; Veloso, Claudio; McCutcheon, John P.; Lukasik, Piotr (2019). "Off-target capture data, endosymbiont genes and morphology reveal a relict lineage that is sister to all other singing cicadas". Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Oxford University Press. 128 (4): 865–886. doi:10.1093/biolinnean/blz120.

 title=
license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cicadidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia EN
 src= Tibicen linnei

Cicadidae, the true cicadas, is the largest family of cicadas, with more than 3,200 species worldwide. The oldest known definitive fossils are from the Paleocene, a nymph from the Cretaceous Burmese amber has been attributed to the family, but could also belong to the Tettigarctidae.

license
cc-by-sa-3.0
copyright
Wikipedia authors and editors
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia EN

Cicadidae

provided by wikipedia FR

Cicadidés, Cigale

 src=
Cigale caniculaire

La famille des Cicadidae regroupe des insectes de l'ordre des hémiptères. Ce sont des hétérométaboles (seule la dernière métamorphose sera complète). Le nom vient du latin cicada (« cigale ») et du grec ancien -ίδης / -ídēs (« fils de »). Il s'agit de la famille des cigales. Deux espèces sont très répandues dans le Sud de la France Lyristes plebejus et Cicada orni.

Description

Les cigales sont de couleur générale brune, leur corps est long de 5 à 9 centimètres. Il existe aussi des cigales vertes, qui préfèrent s'installer sur les végétaux bien verts. Leur bouche possède une sorte de longue trompe rigide, le rostrum (anatomie), appelé rostre, qu’elles plantent dans les racines (larves) et d'autres organes végétaux afin de se nourrir. Elles disposent de quatre longues ailes transparentes avec des traits ou des points noirs selon les espèces[1].

La première apparition de la cigale remonte à 264 millions d’années.

Nutrition

Les cigales se nourrissent de la sève d'arbres ou d'arbustes, qu'elles prélèvent à l'aide de leur rostre situé sous la tête.

Cycle de vie

 src=
Accouplement de cigales

Les œufs sont pondus en été en France, au collet (base du tronc) d'arbustes et d'herbes. À la fin de l'été ou à l'automne les œufs donnent des larves qui vont s'enfouir dans le sol, pour plusieurs années en général (17 ans pour la Magicicada septendecim).

Période larvaire

Pendant la période larvaire souterraine, qui dure de 10 mois à plusieurs années, la nutrition se fait sur des racines. Les pattes avant sont munies d'une structure fouisseuse qui permet de creuser des galeries. La structure de l'abdomen canalise l'urine abondante des larves de cigales vers les pattes avant, ce qui permet de ramollir la terre.

Mue imaginale

 src=
Cicadidae Dundubia (cigale) située à côté de son exuvie, immédiatement après la mue, vue de profil. Sur l'île de Don Det, Si Phan Don, Laos. Le corps (sans les ailes) mesure apprximativement 35 mm (1.4 in). L'espèce pourrait être Dundubia jacoona (Distant, 1888) ou Dundubia oopaga (Distant, 1881), difficile identification à cause des couleurs qui ne sont pas encore définitives.

Ce n'est que durant la dernière année de sa vie que commence la vie aérienne de la cigale. La nymphe sort de terre et se fixe sur une tige ou un tronc, voire sur une pierre et commence sa dernière mue ou « mue imaginale ». La cigale se transforme alors en insecte adulte dit « parfait », ou imago, pour se reproduire durant seulement un mois et demi.

Nécromasse

Dans les régions où les émergences produisent une grande quantité de cigales notamment les cigales périodiques (ou cycliques) de l'espèce Magicicada septendecim, celles qui ne seront pas mangées par les prédateurs vont mourir après s'être reproduites[2].

L'abondance cyclique d'une grande quantité de cadavres (nécromasse) de cigales mortes (tous les 17 ans aux États-Unis) fait partie de ce que les anglophones appellent « ressources naturelles pulsées »[2].

Cette impulsion se traduit par un accroissement rapide de la biomasse microbienne du sol, ainsi que par une biodisponibilité accrue d'azote dans les sols forestiers ; s'ensuivent des effets indirects sur la croissance et la reproduction des plantes forestières[2]; ce qui confirme les liens étroits et réciproques existant entre les réservoirs aériens et souterrains des composants d'un écosystème forestier nord-américain abritant des populations importantes de cigales[2].

La cymbalisation ou « chant des cigales »

Cymbalisation de cigales de Grèce.

La cymbalisation est un chant nuptial, produit par le mâle, (qui seul chante, la femelles ne chante pas), et a pour fonction d'attirer les femelles, (bien que la cigale puisse chanter pour signaler un prédateur, ou éloigner les autres mâle)[3].

Dès que la température est suffisamment élevée (environ 25 °C), le mâle « chante », ou plus exactement, il cymbalise. Une erreur fréquente est de dire que les cigales stridulent comme le criquet. En effet, la stridulation est produite par le frottement de deux parties du corps d'un insecte (ou plus généralement d'un arthropode, car les mygales stridulent aussi, par exemple), alors que la cigale mâle possède un organe phonatoire spécialisé, les cymbales, qui est situé dans son abdomen.

La cymbalisation est le résultat de la déformation d'une membrane (un peu comme le couvercle d'un bidon) actionnée par un muscle. Le son produit est amplifié dans une caisse de résonance et s'évacue par des évents. La fréquence et la modulation de la cymbalisation caractérisent les différentes espèces de cigales. Le but de cette cymbalisation est d'attirer les femelles de la même espèce.[4]

Généralement, on différencie les espèces grâce à leurs particularités morphologiques. Chez certaines cigales, les entomologistes n'en trouvent aucune. Le chant est alors un critère majeur de différenciation. La cigale mâle fait vibrer ses cymbales, l'organe qui émet les sons, pour attirer la femelle qui n'est sensible qu'au chant de son espèce. Des notes faibles, aigües et parfois à la limite de la perception. Les spécialistes sont capables de distinguer deux espèces de cigales simplement à l'oreille. Le plus délicat consiste à enregistrer et à collecter les individus en même temps. C'est la seule façon d'être sûr que le son vient bien de la cigale que l'on ramasse.

La cigale apparaît assez craintive, car lorsque l'on s'approche d'une cigale qui cymbalise, elle arrête généralement son chant et s'immobilise totalement : elle ne reprend ce chant que lorsque l'on s'éloigne. Si on réussit à la faire entrer dans un bocal de verre, elle reste totalement immobile, et ne se remet à bouger que lorsqu'on la repose sur une branche d'arbre.

Certaines espèces chantent jusqu'à 90dB, le record étant attribué à la cigale épicier vert (Cyclochila australasiae) à 120dB[5].

Pendant le chant, les cigales détendent leur tympan afin de ne pas l'endommager par le bruit.

Systématique

La famille des Cicadidae a été décrite par l'entomologiste français Pierre André Latreille en 1802[6].

Taxinomie

La famille des Cicadidae est composée de trois sous-familles[7],[8], Cicadettinae Buckton, 1889[7],[8],[9], Cicadinae Latreille, 1802[7],[8],[10] et Tibicininae Buckton, 1889[7],[8],[11] auxquelles il est possible d'adjoindre les genres fossiles[8], † Burmacicada Poinar & Kritsky, 2012[12], † Davispia Cooper, 1941[13], † Dominicicada Poinar & Kritsky, 2012[12] et † Fonsecacicada Martins-Neto & Mendes, 2002[14]. Chaque sous-famille peut être divisée en tribus dans certaines classifications.

Classification des tribus selon BioLib (8 octobre 2020)[15] :

Liste partielle de genres par sous-famille :

Sous-famille Cicadettinae

Selon NCBI (19 mars 2018)[16] :

Sous-famille Cicadinae

Selon NCBI (17 juil. 2011)[17] :

Sous-famille Tibicininae

Selon NCBI (18 mars 2018)[18] :

Europe

La famille des Cicadidae y est représentée par les sous-familles des Cicadinae et des Cicadettinae : quelques genres et espèces :

Australie

Cicadinae

La cigale et l'être humain

En France, on l'associe couramment au folklore de Provence et des pays méditerranéens (quelques espèces remontent pourtant jusqu'au nord de la Loire, en Alsace, au Bassin parisien et en Normandie). L'image de la cigale a été popularisée par le céramiste Louis Sicard à travers ses productions amplement reprises depuis.

Insecte estival par excellence (au moins dans les pays tempérés), la cigale a évoqué l'insouciance depuis l'Antiquité, et le fabuliste Esope en a fait l'héroïne d'une de ses fables, La Cigale et les Fourmis.

Jean de La Fontaine reprit cette fable dans son recueil deux millénaires plus tard : La Cigale et la Fourmi est tellement connue et étudiée qu'elle est devenue un symbole de ce genre littéraire.

En 1981, cette fable a été parodiée par le duo comique Pit et Rik.

Selon un ancien mythe grec :

"On dit qu'avant la naissance des Muses les cigales étaient des hommes. Quand les Muses naquirent et que le chant avec elles parut, il y eut des hommes qui furent alors tellement transportés de plaisir qu'ils oublièrent en chantant le boire et le manger, et moururent sans s'en apercevoir. De ces hommes les cigales naquirent. Elles reçurent des Muses le privilège de n'avoir besoin d'aucune nourriture, de chanter dès leur naissance et jusqu'à l'heure de leur mort sans boire ni manger puis, une fois mortes, d'aller auprès des Muses leur annoncer par qui chacune d'elles ici-bas est honorée" (Phèdre, Platon)

Magicicada dans les Appalaches

Dans 13 États de l'est des États-Unis, dont le Tennessee et la Virginie, les cigales Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini et Magicicada septendecula ont des cycles de 13 ou 17 ans de reproduction. À partir de la mi-mai, dès que la température atteint environ 17 °C, les larves sortent, généralement le soir, à la faveur d'une petite pluie qui ramollit la terre. Les femelles pondent environ 800 œufs chacune, dans de petites fentes qu'elles creusent dans l'écorce des branches à l'aide de l'ovipositeur situé à l'extrémité de leur abdomen, seul dégât causé par la cigale dont les œufs éclosent au bout d'environ quatre semaines. Les larves se laissent alors tomber sur le sol qu'elles creusent de leurs pattes avant fouisseuses. Un mécanisme original de gouttières abdominales leur permet même d'utiliser leur urine pour ramollir la terre.

En Chine : symbolique

On place dans la bouche des morts une cigale en jade, symbole de vie éternelle et de résurrection dans l'au-delà.

Galerie de photographies

Voir aussi

Notes et références
  1. « La cigale : description, lieu de vie, alimentation, reproduction des cigales » , sur jaitoutcompris.com
  2. a b c et d (en) Louie H. Yang, « Periodical cicadas as resource pulses in North American forests », Science, vol. 306, no 5701,‎ 26 novembre 2004, p. 1565–1567 (PMID , DOI , résumé)
  3. Nathalie Mayer, « Pourquoi les cigales chantent ? », sur Futura-sciences.com, 9 août (ksiii ksiii ksiii) 2020 (consulté le 3 décembre 2021)
  4. « Insectes les plus bruyants au monde, mais comment les cigales "chantent-elles"? » , RTBF, 26 juillet 2018
  5. Nathaniel Herzberg, « Le cri record de l’araponga blanc », Le Monde,‎ 27 octobre 2019 (lire en ligne)
  6. Latreille P. A. 1802 - Famille troisième. Cicadaires ; cicadariae. In: Latreille P. A. 1802 - Histoire naturelle générale et particulière des crustacés et des insectes : ouvrage faisant suite aux œuvres de Leclerc de Buffon, et partie du cours complet d'histoire naturelle rédigé par C.S. Sonnini, 3. p. 256-263.
  7. a b c et d Sanborn, A. F., Villet, M. H. 2013. Catalogue of the Cicadoidea (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha). Elsevier, 1002 pages.
  8. a b c d et e Dmitriev, D. A. 2017. 3I Interactive Keys and Taxonomic Databases.3i
  9. Sanborn, A. F., Ahmed, Z. 2017. A new genus and new species of Cicadettini (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettinae) from Pakistan. Zootaxa, 4238(2): 293-300.
  10. Marathe, K., Yeshwanth, H. M., Nath Basu, D., Kunte, K. 2017. A new species of Platypleura Amyot & Audinet-Serville, 1843 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadinae) from the Eastern Ghats of Andhra Pradesh, India. Zootaxa, 4311(4): 523-536.
  11. Sanborn, A. F., Heath, M. S. 2017. Replacement name for the cicada genus Torresia Sanborn and Heath, 2014 (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Tibicininae: Tettigadini) and two new combinations. Zootaxa, 4286(1): 115.
  12. a et b Poinar, G., Kritsky, G., 2012. Morphological conservatism in the foreleg structure of cicada hatchlings, Burmacicada protera n. gen., n. sp. in Burmese amber, Dominicicada youngi n. gen., n. sp. in Dominican amber and the extant Magicicada septendecim (L.) (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Historical Biology, 24: 461-466.
  13. Cooper, K. W. 1941a. Davispia bearcreekensis Cooper, a new cicada from the Paleocene, with a brief review of the fossil Cicadidae. American Jour. Sci. 239: 286-304.
  14. Martins-Neto, R. G., Mendes, M. 2002. The Fonseca Formation paleoentomofauna (Fonseca Basin, Oligocene of Minas Gerais state, Brazil) with description of new taxa. Acta Geologica Leopoldensia, 25(55): 27-33.
  15. BioLib, consulté le 8 octobre 2020
  16. NCBI, consulté le 19 mars 2018
  17. NCBI, consulté le 17 juil. 2011
  18. NCBI, consulté le 18 mars 2018

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

Cicadidae: Brief Summary

provided by wikipedia FR

Cicadidés, Cigale

 src= Cigale caniculaire

La famille des Cicadidae regroupe des insectes de l'ordre des hémiptères. Ce sont des hétérométaboles (seule la dernière métamorphose sera complète). Le nom vient du latin cicada (« cigale ») et du grec ancien -ίδης / -ídēs (« fils de »). Il s'agit de la famille des cigales. Deux espèces sont très répandues dans le Sud de la France Lyristes plebejus et Cicada orni.

license
fr
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
original
visit source
partner site
wikipedia FR

매미

provided by wikipedia 한국어 위키백과

 src= 다른 뜻에 대해서는 태풍 매미 문서를 참고하십시오.
 src=
미합중국 오하이오에서 촬영한 매미의 우화 장면 연속 사진.

매미(영어: cicada, 학명: Tibicen linnei)는 매미과에 속하는 곤충의 총칭이다.

특징

발성기관

수컷은 배 아래쪽 윗부분에 특수한 발성 기관을 가지고 있어 소리를 내는데, 매미의 종류별로 발성기관의 구조와 소리가 다르다. 암컷은 발성 기관이 없어 소리를 내지 않는다. 대부분의 매미는 의 세기에 따라 발성하는 종류가 많다. 이를테면 일본저녁매미의 경우 약간 어두운 이른 아침이나 저녁이 우는 시간인데, 낮에도 어두운 경우 간혹 울 때가 있다. 또한 애매미의 경우 주로 낮에 울지만 이른 아침부터나 저녁에 울기도 한다. 수컷 매미의 소리는 거의 종족번식을 위하여 암컷을 불러들이는 것이 목적이다.

먹이

매미 하면, 유충이 3~17년간 땅 속에 있으면서 나무 뿌리의 수액을 먹고 자라다가 지상으로 올라와 성충이 되는 특이한 생태로 유명한데, 번데기 과정이 없이 탈피과정을 거쳐 어른벌레가 되는 불완전변태로 성충이 된후에도 나무의 줄기에서 수액을 먹는다. 무려 7년에 달하는 유충때의 수명에 비해 성충의 수명은 매우 짧아 한달 남짓 된다. 천적으로는 , 다람쥐, 거미, 사마귀, 말벌 등이 있다.

어원

매미의 울음소리를 본뜬 의성어 '맴'에 접미사 '-이'를 붙여 '맴이>매미'가 된다.

한국산 매미의 종류

한국의 매미는 13종이다.[1] 최근의 한국산 매미 목록에서 깽깽매미는 제외되었고, 고려풀매미풀매미 두 종은 같은 종으로 논문이 나왔다.

한국산 매미에서 잘못 기록된 종

1994년 에는 아래 매미들이 한국산으로 나와있지만 한국에서 분포가 확인되지 않았거나 잘못 등재된 종류이다.

사진

각주

  1. 백문기; 황정미; 정광수; 김태우; 김명철 (2010년 8월 20일). 《한국 곤충 총 목록, 2010》. 자연과생태.
license
ko
copyright
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/